TTM Contributor 4 TTM Contributor 4

Our organization is the first licensed in Syria under the new Media Law. We are a group of professional journalists specializing in TV and media services, following up with daily breaking news all that Syria offers. We are based in Damascus and have branches across Syria. We focus on the human, social, and economical situations in Syria. We also do reports in English, French, Spanish, and Russian. We distribute through FTP and provide satellite services. We also work as fixers with any foreign crew of journalists that is willing to visit Syria to cover what is happening. As fixers we apply and acquire official permissions, meetings, and provide transportation.

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Syrian Army Entering Historical Villa...
By TTM Contributor 4
12 Apr 2014

Syrian Army troops have captured some of the last remaining opposition strongholds north of Damascus, including the ancient Christian hamlet of Maaloula.

The rebels loss of a key supply route into opposition-held districts around Damascus, helps strengthen President Bashar Al-Assad's position in and around the capital ahead of presidential elections during which he intends to run for a third term.

The capture of Sarkha, Maaloula and Jibbeh was the latest in a series of successes by Assad forces against rebels in the Qalamoun region since launching an offensive in November in the strategic area, a wedge of mountainous territory between the capital and the Lebanese border.

Maaloula, a historic Christian enclave set into the rocky hills, has changed hands several times in the war.

Rebels still hold a few towns and other pockets in Qalamoun. Control of the region means control over the flow of weapons and fighters to Ghouta, a sprawling opposition area east of Damascus from which rebels have been firing mortars into the capital. It is also important because of a highway that links Damascus to the Mediterranean port of Latakia and the coast, the heartland of the Alawite sect that Assad and his family belong to.

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Barrel Bombs Displace People of Aleppo
By TTM Contributor 4
07 Feb 2013

In recent weeks, the city of Aleppo saw a large migration from areas controlled by the opposition because of the barrel bombing campaign carried out by government forces.The exodus of people came majorly from the eastern neighborhoods as the concentration of shelling and bombing by government forces focused on those eastern fronts controlled by the opposition, especially those areas near the Al-Nairab military airport and the international airport of Aleppo. Government forces are trying to occupy these neighborhoods, thus isolating the eastern part of the city controlled by the opposition.

While the eastern neighborhood areas beyond the control of the government witnessed almost complete exodus - especially in Marjah, Al-Misar, Al-Gizmati and Al-Shi'ar - in the western neighborhoods, the displacement is much less severe.

شهدت مدينة حلب خلال الأسابيع الأخيرة الماضية حركة نزوح كبيرة من المناطق التي تسيطر عليها المعارضة بسبب حملة القصف بالبراميل المتفجرة من قبل القوات الحكومية . وبينما شهدت الأحياء الشرقية من المناطق الخارجة عن سيطرة النظام نزوحاً شبه كامل، وخاصة في أحياء المرجة والميسر والجزماتي والشعار وطريق الباب، كانت حركة النزوح في الأحياء الغربية من هذه المناطق أقل حدة. يأتي ذلك بعد تركيز النظام ضغطه على الجبهات الشرقية من الأحياء التي تسيطر عليها المعارضة، وخاصة تلك القريبة من مطاري النيرب العسكري وحلب الدولي، حيث يسعى النظام لاقتحام هذه الأحياء وعزل القسم الشرقي من المنطقة الخاضعة لسيطرة المعارضة عن القسم الغربي منها.

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The Fate of Syrian children
Aleppo
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Mar 2014

Syrian children in Aleppo force to work to provide for their families, often having lost a parent, or they are themselves victims of the governmental forces brutal strategies.

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Working Children In Wartime
Aleppo, Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
01 Feb 2014

As the conflict in Syria nears the end of its third year, it has had terrible consequences for the children of the country. While there are more than 1 million children refugees outside of Syria, inside the country there are over 4 million children affected by the conflict, and 10,000 who have died. As education has been disrupted and local economies have crashed, with more than 2 million children who are not in school, children are forced to go to work to help support their families. According to the Child Protection Working Group, many children working are doing so to repay family debts. Many of these children do this to ensure that they and their family can eat and survive. From different areas of Aleppo, children can be seen in many different forms of labor, from selling vegetables, bread and other foods to collecting metal scraps and working in mechanic shops. One child is selling goods after losing her father in a bombing, while another two sell donuts because of the economic collapse outside Syrian government-controlled areas. But what they all have in common is that they are all desperate, children selling goods on the streets in order to provide for their families and themselves, having often lost members of their family, including their parents.

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Al-Hamidiyya Souk in Damascus
Damascus
By TTM Contributor 4
02 Mar 2014

Title: Al-Hamidiyya Souk in Damascus

Date: 02/03/2014Location: Damascus, Al Hamidiyya Souk

Description:With the Syrian crisis entering its fourth year, Al-Hamidiyya Souk stays a hub for the shoppers. Al-Hamidiyya Souk is a site where Syria’s diversity is concentrated in a single place. Whoever visits Damascus and doesn’t go to the Souk is as if they didn’t visit the city at all, the oldest inhabited city in History. The Souk that was built hundreds of years ago and hold its current shape since the 17th century, during the reign of the Ottoman Sultan Abd Al-Hamid II.On its side passes the street that is 600 meters long and on its sides you can find 200 shops of different types. The Souk itself is divided into several sub-souks like the silk market, the jewelry market, the tailors’ market and others. It is safe to say that the Syrians invented the Mall hundreds of years ago. Al-Hamidiyya souk saw the first protests in March 2011. The Syrian crisis affected the market and the shoppers are gone. Despite the shops being open, due to the armed clashes that regularly occur in Damascus and its suburbs (country side) the shoppers, especially the tourists that represent a big portion of the market’s income, are not coming anymore, neither are the locals who are afraid after the area was shelled a few times, resulting in several deaths and injuries.

The Interviewees:

Abu Abdo owner of “The Orientals” shop says: “We are very much so affected by the crisis, work is very slow, specially for my type of business that greatly relies on western and Arab tourists.”

Shopper 1: “The Syrian crisis affected the markets, some people are scared to go out. Also, there are no tourists and the Syrians are using their savings on food and buying only things that they really need.”

Shopper 2: “When it comes to Souk Al-Hamidiyya, the people are scared, it’s not like before when we used to go down and buy what we wanted. Now we buy only what we really need. May God protect Syria."

Shopper 3: "Al-Hamidiyya Souk was where everyone from all areas and provinces would come and buy whatever they wanted, but now the number of shoppers has gone down drastically because of the situation."

Shopper 4: "Before we came here and found the market full of all types of people, people buying, but now there's almost no one, just a few people."

B-Roll: A collection of shots of the Souk and its shops, as well as the shoppers. Shot of the entrance of the marketplace from the Al-Oumawi Mosque side and the ancient ruins that still stand at the gates of the Souk.

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Damascus Street Scenes (B-roll)
Damascus, Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
21 Sep 2015

Various shots of streets and the old market in the government-controlled part of Damascus, Syria.

Note: Interview with Damascus residents about life in the city (not translated)

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Raqqa Before ISIS
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 4
01 Nov 2009

This is archival video of various locations in Raqqa province taken in 2009 and 2010, before the outbreak of the war in Syria.
Raqqa came under the control of ISIS in early 2013 and is now considered the militant group’s self-proclaimed capital.

Shotlist

Aerial shot of southern entrance of Raqqa city
Traveling of Raqqa city’s southern entrance
Various of Clock Tower Square in Raqqa city
Various of area in western outskirts of Raqqa city on the Euphrates river
Various of archaeological site outside Raqqa city
Various of Jaabar fort on the Euphrates to the west of Raqqa city
Various of Euphrates dam
Various of irrigation canal
Various of wheat fields
Various of the Euphrates, the Old Bridge and archaeological sites
Various of the Abbasid Caliph Haroun al-Rashid palace in Raqqa city
Various of wheat crops
Various of Euphrates
Various of sugar factory in Raqqa
Various of watermelon field
Various of sugar factory
Various of Resafa archaeological site to the south of Raqqa

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Training Women Fighters of the Kurdis...
Qamishle, Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
13 Nov 2014

Qamishle, Syria
November 8, 2014

Kurdish women have had a leading role in defending Kobane against ISIS. More than 1,000 women are actively involved in the fight, according to Heboun Derik, an official in the Women’s Protection Units (YPJ), the women’s branch in the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) militia.

This video shows life inside a training camp in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria. In this camp, young women in their twenties leave the comfort of civilian life behind them to receive basic military training before they head to Kobane, one Syria’s fiercest frontlines.

Shot list:

00:00 – 01:25

Various shots show female fighters during field training.

01:26 – 01:48

Various shots show fighters during shooting practice.

01:49 – 02:17

Various shots show marching fighters, returning from the training field.

02:18 – 02:56
Various shots show fighters during lunch.

02:57 - 03:18
Various shots shows fighters dancing dabkeh.

03:19 – 03:49

Interview with 26-year-old trainer Furat, woman, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

03:50 – 04:17
Interview with Gulistan, the head of a 20-fighter unit in the YPJ, woman, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

04:18 – 05:04

Interview with Dijla, a female fighter, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

Interview with Gulistan, the head of a 20-fighter unit in the YPJ, woman, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

“I am 20 years old. I volunteered with the YPJ a year and a half ago. After I received my baccalaureate, I did not want to continue my studies at university. I decided to enlist in the YPJ after extremist groups attacked Kurdish areas.

“I am here to prove to the male-dominated society that women are not weak; they can protect their honor against the attacks carried out by ISIS, which is hiding behind Islam. Most of the girls who joined the YPJ have the same feeling. They have the will to free women from the restrictions that have governed them for so long.

“I am very happy to be at this training camp with the rest of my female comrades, even though we have been deprived of the leisure of civilian life; our military outfits are who we are. The attacks by ISIS against our areas increased our resilience. All of this created in us a stronger will to fight and give up everything for the sake of the homeland.

Interview with Dijla, a female fighter, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

I am 20 years old. I left my studies and joined the YPJ three years ago. At a certain moment, I realized that I had to offer something for my homeland and have a value among the society members. I call upon all girls to join the YPJ.
The attacks against our Kurdish areas were motivated many women to join the YPJ and pick up arms in order to save women’s dignity and honor.

Interview with Beritan, a female fighter, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

I am 21 years old. I obtained my middle school diploma and joined the YPJ when terrorist organizations attacked Sari Kaniyeh [Ras al-Ain] two years ago. It was my national duty to defend our homeland alongside men, and I am happy with this decision.

Interview with 26-year-old trainer Furat, woman, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

“Here, at the YPJ’s Martyr Sheilan training camp, I supervise the training of female fighters who have recently enlisted. In each training cycle, 20 trainees undergo physical and tactical training for two consecutive months. “The training program starts at 7 am with a physical fitness class, followed by an orientation session that covers fighting ethics, loyalty and love for the homeland and combat comrades, and an introduction to women’s rights.

“After that, fighters are taught how to use all kinds of light weapons – Kalashnikov rifles, machine guns, pistols and sniper rifles. We also simulate battles so that fighters would be accustomed to real fighting. Fighters in this training camp have enlisted voluntarily. They are between 20 and 25 years of age, and are very happy because they are convinced with their choice of a new life, which made them independent.

“After the training, there is lunch followed by a recreation time, during which the fighters practice their hobbies. They sing, dance dabkeh, play games or read. We try, as much as possible, to create an atmosphere of intimacy and love among the fighters so that they would not feel bored or tired, and so they do not feel far from their families.

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Kobane: FSA Faction Joins Fight Again...
Kobane
By TTM Contributor 4
05 Oct 2014

October 5-6, 2014
Kobane, Syria

The frontlines in the city of Kobani/Ain al-Arab where several FSA battalions have a arrived from different fronts to fight along side the Kurdish fighters defending the city against IS. This footage was shot on the edges and inside the city of Kobane on the 5th and 6th of October, 2014.

Shot List
1- statement of formation of the joint operations room under the name of Tigris Volcano
2- shot if fighters from the Al kasas Army
3- shots of clashes between Al Kasas army and IS
4- shot of a fighter firing an RPG during the clashes
4- shots of clashes with light and medium weapons
5- shots of fighters from Al Kasas army heading to the clashes area
6- shots of snipers and sniper activity
7- shots of clashes with IS

interviews and transcripts:

00:03-00:27 "In the name of God, the merciful, the almighty, he said: 'be united under God and do not be dispersed. Remember God's graces, for you are only enemies if you are so in your heart, but with God's grace you will be brothers.' The formation of a joint operations room under the name of Tigris Volcano is meant to stand against the injustice of the Baghdadi Mobs (IS)."

01:40-01:52 (Abu Abdallah) Commander of the Al Kasas battalion: "This is the formation of a unified operations room is meant to merge and organize operations. Of course, as he said in the statement, we are going to liberate Menbej, Raqqa and it's outskirts in the direction of Deir Ez Zour, God willing."

01:52-02:40 (Abu Abdallah) Commander of the Al Kasas battalion: "Of course the city of Ain al-Arab is a Syrian city and it's people are Syrian. We are fighting on Syrian soil and protecting the Syrian people. We are like those fighting in Qalamoun and Deraa and Ghouta, Idlib and Aleppo. God forbid, if we are forced to do a certain thing [retreat], we will go to another place and deploy our forces in more than one place and we will fight them everywhere. We will fight them to the last breath.
We have not received any support from the the government, or the Coalition, or the FSA, or their joint staff, or anyone at all. Be it through men, or gear or ammunition, we have not received anything at all, as if we are not part of the FSA

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Airstrikes Target Syrian Oil Fields
Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
07 Oct 2014

al-Malakiyah, Syria
October 3, 2014

The International Coalition's aircrafts targeted a number of primary oil refineries, known as "The Burners" in the governorate of Al Hasakah, Deir Ez Zour and Raqqa. However, they did not hit any of the refineries in the areas under Kurdish control in Al Hasakah.

The basic refineries, known as “Burners” became widespread two years ago to combat the difficulties of getting the Fuel to Al Hasakah from Baniyas and Aleppo.
The workers in these refineries depend on primitive methods to extract fuel (oil and gas) through huge metal containers of different capacities, ranging from 8 to 40 barrels of crude oil.

After the oil wells in Al Suwaidyeh and Rmaylan in the city of Al Malikiyah northeastern Syria stopped pumping to the refineries in Baniyas and Aleppo, the PYD, who control these wells, decided to sell crude oil to the Burners owners for 4000 SYP (20 USD) a barrel.
After extracting the fuel, the Burner owners sell them to the dealers, who in turn sell it to the remaining regions of Al Hasakah, as well as other Syrian governorates and even to Iraq.
The workers get paid a daily salary of 2000 SYP (almost 10 USD) for 10 working hours a day, sometimes more.

Shot Lists:
General view of The Burners
Shots of black smoke
Several shots of the workers

(01:12) Abu Ahmad, worker in the refinery: We wake up to work at 4 am and we keep working until 4 pm, it is very hard but we have to work, we have no other option, we are forced to do this job to make a living (01:30)

(01:31) Ahmad, worker: We did not find any other job, we work for 9-10 hours and sometimes until midnight, thank God we are working (01:42)

(01:43) Sameer: I am a university student, and I do not have enough money to continue my studies, so I dropped out of the university and came here to work in the burner. I know this type of work causes many diseases, and it is very dangerous. We are forced to do what is bad to avoid what is worse (01:58)

(01:59) Ali, worker: We have been working in the burners for over two years, we have no other option but to work in this burner and there are no job opportunities (02:11)

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Fighter Jet Spotted Over Deir Ez Zour...
al-Mayadeen
By TTM Contributor 4
25 Sep 2014

September 26, 2014
Al-Mayadeen, Deir Ez Zour Province, Syria

Footage shows what local residents believe to be a US-led coalition fighter jet in the sky over the town of al-Mayadeen, near Deir Ez Zour in eastern Syria. Footage also shows smoke rising on the horizon from what local residents believe to be an airstrike
in the same area. Local residents have also reported seeing up to twelve reconnaissance flights overhead today.

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Renewed FSA Offensive Against IS near...
Aleppo Province
By TTM Contributor 4
22 Sep 2014

September 19-20, 2014
FSA front lines, in Northern Aleppo Province

In the lead up to possible American strikes in Syria, the Free Syrian Army has launched a renewed offensive against ISIS in northern Aleppo province. The FSA frontier extends for 70 KM from the town of Shaeer, in the south, to the Syrian-Turkish border in the north. Managed by Nahrawan al-Sham operation room, the FSA is using many light to heavy weaponry distributed along the frontier. ISIS is taking advantage of the gathering of FSA fighters to attack them with car bombs. This has forced the FSA to increase road blocks and searching points. The two sides continue to attack each other, as they have been for the past two months.

Sound Bites:
Sound Bite 1: (Man, Arabic)
Abu al-Abbas, Heavy weaponry brigade leader in the Nahrawan al-Sham operation room:
“We are now attacking ISIS locations from a 2400m distance with a locally made 90mm mortar. Thank God, we have a strong spirit and we are very motivated in the operation room”.

Sound Bite 2: (Man, Arabic)
Abu Maher, Field leader in Nahrawan operation room:
“We are now stationed in one of the attacking frontiers against ISIS. We are a part of the fighting groups located on the frontier, we are on the first line with ISIS. We are all one and we are all cooperating and working under the orders of the operation room. Throughout the night, many conflicts happen and, in the upcoming few days, there will be movement”.

Sound Bite 3: (Man, Arabic)
Abu al-Laith, a sector leader in the operation room:
“We are stationed and prepared to fight ISIS, we are working under one operation room and any move ISIS makes we will be ready to attack with mortars and heavy weaponry. The distance between us and them is 700 meters”.

Shot List:
Various shots of the fighters preparing the mortar to attack ISIS locations.
A shot of a locally made 90mm mortar firing towards ISIS locations.
Various shots of the fighters on the frontier where they fight ISIS.
Various shots of the FSA fighters aiming at ISIS with heavy weaponry.

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Aleppo Children Brave Shelling and St...
Aleppo
By TTM Contributor 4
16 Sep 2014

September 7, 2014
Aleppo, Syria

Despite fears of renewed shelling, children in rebel-held northern Aleppo begin a new school year in a makeshift school, housed in a building under construction. The 2014/15 school year in Aleppo is off to a modest start after the abrupt cancellation of the last school year due to constant shelling. Parents continue to fear for the lives of their children because regime forces might once again resume their shelling of the area. The schools themselves are already understaffed as teachers have fled to safer areas. The current teachers are mostly volunteer university students who are struggling against unstable security conditions and a lack of equipment and resources.

Shot list:

1- Interior shot, daytime. Family eats.
2- Interior shot, daytime. Children study.
3- Exterior shot, daytime. Children get ready to go to school.
4- Exterior shots, daytime. Destroyed school building.
5- exterior shot. Daytime. Young students gathered in the schoolyard.
6- interior shot. Daytime. Students inside the classrooms.
7- interior shot. Daytime. Cutaways of the class.

Transcription:

Nour, student (female, Arabic):
"We fear going to school because lots of my friends died in school".

Ahmed, student (male, Arabic):
"The school here was bombed, and we are afraid to come to school because there are lots of air strikes. A few days ago they bombed that school over there, that is why we are afraid, because of the planes and the shelling".

Mahmoud, student (male, Arabic):
“We do not have schools here. They are merely unfinished houses that we are using. We are refugees from other areas and there are very few teachers and very few books.”

Ezzedine Bakhso, teacher (male, Arabic)
"As for exercise books and curriculum, we are summarizing and cutting out some material that we deem inappropriate for this stage and the educational goal that we are aiming for. As for books and copybooks, there are volunteers who provide some material according to our needs. This is coordinated through the educational bureau. Regarding the volunteers, there used to be a large number of them and now they are almost non-existent.”

Mohammad Riad Hamsho, teacher (male, Arabic)
“We have taken refuge on an underground floor with no utilities, such as running water or electrical power. It is uninhabitable and we have had to gather all students here. Some parents are apprehensive and do not want to send their children here because it might come under fire at any moment. We are understaffed and we lack resources and are completely dependent on young volunteers who sometimes lack the needed life experience.”

Mohammad Nour, volunteer (male, Arabic)
“We had to do this work because there were no qualified teachers available and since we had already lost our universities and studies we felt we wanted to fill the void so that the young generation would catch up on their education.”

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Damascus: 800-Year-Old Bathhouse Endu...
Damascus
By TTM Contributor 4
08 Sep 2014

September 9, 2014
Damascus, Syria

Buried deep the historic al-Hamidiya Market in Damascus, one of the oldest traditional bathhouses in the city continues its business as usual, despite the ongoing war in Syria. Established in 1169, the Nour al-Din al-Shaheed bathhouse is one of the best examples of unadulterated Damascene history. It's cavernous bathing rooms and reception area have changed little over the years and guests can still enjoy an opportunity to experience a custom that has endured centuries of siege, occupation, and war.

Translation:

(04:51) "I am Majed Abdul Rahman, I work in Nour al-Din al-Shahid public bath. This bath consists of 4 sections: the outside, inside, steam room and the massage and exfoliating room. We have grooms [men about to get married] coming here almost daily. When they come here they use the exfoliating and the massage room, then they shower and after that, they go to the outside section and change the towels, drink some tea and [smoke] nargileh [water pipe], rest, get dressed, pay, then leave. There are lots of public baths, but this bath is special as it is old and cultural, provides a nice experience, and is very communal, they [guests] are allowed to bring food with them." (05:53)

(05:54) "First of all, my work is between Lebanon and Syria, I come to Syria every week, and I cannot come here without passing by the bathroom and bathing here in Souk al-Hamidiya. Every time I come here I have to roam around Damascus, and I cross all this distance from Lebanon to Syria so I can enjoy this bath. Honestly, we do not have baths like that in Lebanon, you can only find it here in Souk al-Hamidiya. The visit to the bathroom is very comforting and relaxing, you forget bout all your troubles at work in Lebanon and you forget about it here in Souk al-Hamidiya. You feel like you went back in time, to the era of your ancestors, and this is something we lack in Lebanon." (06:38)

(06:39) "I come to this public bath with my friends regularly, we are a group of students, we come here to see each other, enjoy our time, the atmosphere here is nice, and it is very relaxing." (06:55)

(06:56) "We are a group of friends, we come here every once and a while, we really like it here and we enjoy our time. I advise every man to come here so he can experience the old culture through this public bath that has been around for over 1,000 years." (07:10)

Shotlist:
Various shots of Souk al-Hamidiya

Various shots of the entrance of the bathhouse

Various shots of the bathhouse (exterior section)

Various shots of the bathhouse (interior section)

various shots of the steam room while its empty

Various shots of the steam room

Various shots of the exfoliating room

Various shots of people inside the exfoliating room

Various shots of the massage room

A shot of a person leaving the interior section

Various shots show the services provided in the bathhouse, such as tea and shisha

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Aleppo Children Brave Shelling and St...
Aleppo
By TTM Contributor 4
09 Sep 2014

September 7, 2014
Aleppo, Syria
Location: Unfinished building that has been turned into a makeshift school.

Children in rebel held northern Aleppo begin a new school year in a makeshift school housed in a building under construction, despite fears of renewed shelling. The 2014/2015 school year in rebel held Aleppo is off to a modest start after the abrupt stop of the last school year due to constant shelling. Parents continue to fear for the lives of their children because regime forces might once again resume shelling of the area. The schools themselves are already understaffed as teachers have fled to safer areas. The current teachers are mostly volunteer university students who are struggling against unstable security conditions and a lack of equipment and resources.

Interviewee one: Mahmoud, student.

“We do not have schools here. They are merely unfinished houses that we are using. We are refugees from other areas and there are very few teachers and very few books.”

Interviewee 2: Ezzedine Bakhso, teacher

As for copybooks and curriculum, we are summarizing and cutting out some material that we deem inappropriate for this stage and the educational goal that we are aiming for. As for books and copybooks, there are volunteers who provide some material according to our needs. This is coordinated through the educational bureau. Regarding the volunteers, there used to be a large number of them and now they are almost non-existent.”

Interviewee 3: Mohammad Riad Hamsho

“We have taken refuge in an underground floor with no utilities, like running water or electrical power. It is uninhabitable and we have had to gather all students here. Some parents are apprehensive and do not want to send their children here because it might come under fire at any moment. We are understaffed and we lack resources and are completely dependent on young volunteers who sometimes lack the needed life experience.”

Interviewee 4: Mohammad Nour, Volunteer.

“We had to do this work because there were no qualified teachers available and since we had already lost our universities and studies we felt we wanted to fill the void so that the young generation would catch up on their education.”

Shotlist:

1- Exterior shots, daytime. Destroyed school building.
2- exterior shot. Daytime. Young students gathered in the schoolyard.
3- interior shot. Daytime. Students inside the classrooms.
4- interior shot. Daytime. Cutaways of the class.

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Health Care Crisis in Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
22 Jun 2014

June 17, 2014
Damascus, Syria

Syria's health care system is facing a crisis as hospitals have come under attack and medical supplies have not been replenished because of international sanctions. This video visits a hospital in Damascus and interviews healthcare authorities on the growing crisis.

Interview 1: Dr. Saed Alnayef – Minister of Health in Syria
"The source of this bad situation is not limited to actions of terrorists who directly targeted medical institutions and services, but also includes their targeting and destruction of other service sectors such as water and electricity. This has affected both the medical and the environmental situation in the country. There is the economic siege which has affected the importing of medicine and medical equipment. This poses a great challenge for us. We were able to make use of all our potential resources in terms of medicine, equipment, and medical staff. This way we were able to make up for the shortages, and provide decent medical care for Syrian citizens. However, this targeted destruction [by armed groups] affected 67 hospitals, while more than 38 hospitals completely went out of business. Also, 400 cars were destroyed and more than 20 medicine factories."

Interview 2: Dr. Abd al-Karim – Emergency Room Doctor.
"The public's perception of the hospital in Damascus is that its one of the largest hospitals in Damascus. Recently, the hospital suffered a lot due to the constant increase in volume of people visiting the hospital for consults, which sometimes exceeds 500 to 1000 patients. The patients come not only from Damascus and its suburbs, but also from other Syrian cities due to lack of medical care there. We suffered in this hospital and we are still suffering from the scarcity of some medical products that we used to import from other countries. This is due to the economic siege on the Syrian government. Other than that, there is malfunctioning equipment that we struggled to fix because they were imported from other countries who have boycotted Syria. So to provide the required medical care at the hospital, we had to find other local ways to fix the equipment or use other equipment and find alternatives."

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Supporters of Bashar al-Assad Rally i...
Damascus
By TTM Contributor 4
04 Jun 2014

June 04, 2014
Damascus, Syria

Car convoys of supporters of Syrian president Bashar al-Assad rally on the Mezzeh Highway in central Damascus.

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Residents and Religious Leaders Vote ...
Sweida
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

June 3, 2014
Sweida, Syria

Residents and religious leaders in the government controlled city of Sweida vote and celebrate at a polling station during the Syrian presidential election. Included are interviews with two election workers in two different polling stations, and with the Sheikh al-Akl, the spiritual leader of Druze sect in Syria.

Adnan Janoud, Head of the First Polling Station in Sweida province:
"At 6:30 in the early morning we started. We had the presence of the judiciary committee who opened the boxes and make sure there were no papers inside. They then sealed them again with the committee, the agents, and the journalists as witnesses. The vote then started after we set the right atmosphere for the voters to feel free to enter the secret room [voting booth]. Throughout the huge turn out, we were able to organize the voting process comfortably and smoothly. Large numbers of people showed up to vote and we had to remember that they came here during the difficult times Syria is suffering from. Voters came here, not only to vote for a president, but to vote for [their opinion on] the situation and for the resistance in this area, and [their will] to stand in the face of all the forces cooperating against Syria, be they foreign or Arab. We faced no obstacles during the voting process”.

Najat al-Shaar, Head of Second Polling Station in Sweida:
"We consider this a national celebration, a complete national celebration. We will definitely win with such a resilient people, resilient army, and resilient leader. I would like to thank these people for their excitement and love for their country and their love for the Syrian army”.

Interviewer: Are you facing any difficulties?

Najat al-Shaar:
“There are no difficulties, only the joy and excitement that you can see. There is no difficulty, we will win with help of God, thank you”.

Voter 1:
“Today is a democratic celebration, it is a celebration for Syrians. It is our victory and pride, our national duty, and it is about facing everyone. I came here to vote for the President, Dr. Bashar al-Assad, our candidate, and our pride and protector”.

Voter 2:
“Today represents the love between Syrians and we would like to salute our leader Dr. Bashar al-Assad. Today is a national celebration that indicates Syrians love for each other and their unity”.

Voter 3:
“Today is the day of victory, and it is the day of the presidential election. It is the day Syria enters the modern stage with the leadership of Bashar al-Assad. Today we will be together along with Bashar al-Assad--Bashar the protector, Bashar the victor--and along with the Syrian Arab army to conquer the invaders and kick out the terrorists”.

Interviewer: Your Eminence, what does this day mean to you?

Sheikh al-Akl, Spiritual Leader of the Druze Sect in Syria:
“It is a national celebration to prove to the world that Syria is able to manage itself and take care of its own business. Syrians are the ones to decide the fate of Syria and the process of voting for the President is evidence to our victory. This victory comes in time with the victory of the Syrian Arab Army on the ground. We proved to everyone that our choice is a peaceful solution and national dialogue. It is a message to be sent that the crisis in Syria cannot be solved without the approval of Syrians or with violence and destruction”.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A line of voters wait under a poster of the Syrian presidential candidates at a polling station.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A crowd of women voters at the Municipality building in Idlib.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
02 Jun 2014

People gather to vote at Mustafa Khalouf high school in Tartus.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

His Eminence Sheikh al-Akl, spiritual leader of the Druze sect, casts his vote in the Syrian presidential election in the southern city of Sweida.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

Presidential candidate Maher Hajjar casts his vote at a polling station in Damascus.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

Presidential candidate Maher Hajjar drops his voting slip into the ballot box, at a polling station in Damascus.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

People gather to vote at the Baniyas Post Office in Tartus.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

An enormous, pro-government, crowd gathers on al-Mshabke street in Tartus

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad casts his vote, surrounded by crowds of supporters, Damascus.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his wife, Asmaa al-Assad, prepare their voting slips at a polling station in Damascus.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

People gather to vote at the Baniyas Post Office, Tartus.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A long line of voters cheer, in the village of Jdeidet Yaboos, near Qudsaya.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A crowd of people in the village of Jdeidet Yaboos, near Qudssaya, wave the Syrian flag and posters of Bashar al-Assad.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A group of elders from the Druze, a religious sect largely loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, vote at a school in Sweida.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
02 Jun 2014

A group of pro-Assad voters congregate near a police station in Idlib, wearing matching caps and t-shirts.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A man drops his voting slip into the ballot box, at the Municipality building in Sweida.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A woman, holding her Syrian ID card, waits for her turn to vote at the Directorate of Health in Tartus.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A crowd of people wait to vote at the Directorate of Health, in government-held Idlib.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A huge crowd waits to vote at the Directorate of Agriculture in Hama.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A group of women cast their votes at a polling station in the al-Andalus school, Homs.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
Syria, Hama
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A woman casts her vote at a polling station in the Directory of Education, Hama.

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Bashar al-Assad Casts His Ballot in t...
Damascus
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

June 3, 2014
Damascus, Syria

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad casts his ballot in the Syrian presidential election at a polling station in al-Malki Neighborhood of Damascus.

Video Source: Syrian State Television
No Sound

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Syrian Election Officials Count Votes...
Damascus
By TTM Contributor 4
04 Jun 2014

June 4, 2014
Damascus, Syria

Election officials in the government-held Mezze neighborhood of Damascus count votes from yesterday's Syrian presidential election at a polling station in the Real Estate Bank. Video includes interviews with election officials.

Abdul Latif Ahmad, Head of Polling Station:
“The election started at 7 in the morning and the turn out was huge. The whole process went easily and smoothly and lasted until 7 in the evening and then it was extended until 12 midnight. At 12 midnight we closed the boxes and sealed them with a plastic seal. Then we opened the boxes and counted the envelopes. We placed the counted envelopes into cases, each case contains 100 envelopes. After that we opened each case and counted the number of votes each candidate got according to the voting ballots. It was very easy going”.

Ezzeddin Ismail, Supervisor of the Counting Process:
“The voting process started at 7 in the morning. The turn out was really big, so we required a five hour extension until 12 midnight. Thank God the first election in 60 years went very smoothly. The Syrian population expressed their ambitions and hopes about the president they want to lead them into the future and everything went well. Now that the voting is finished, we have started the counting process”.

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Government-Held Homs Votes in Syrian ...
Homs
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

June 3, 2014
Homs, Syria

Residents in the Government-Held city of Homs cast their ballots in the Syrian presidential election at a polling station in al-Baath University.

Speakers:

Fatima Hussein, head of polling station:
"Since the early morning, ever since we got to the polling station ready to vote, large numbers of people came to the polling station. This is a huge rebuttal to all the enemies of Syria who are fighting us. This huge turnout came to vote for the new president of Syria who will lead us to the safety and security and help us rebuild Syria".

Mohamad al-Nasri, "Syria Lovers Youths" Spokesperson:
"We came here today to join this national celebration. We are convinced that we are going to vote for President Bashar al-Assad to renew his presidency because he is our leader here in Syria. We are also, as young adults, working here in the polling station to organize the election and ease the voting process. We are very happy on this day because we truly consider it a national celebration".

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Syria Election: Residents in Governme...
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

June 3, 2014
al-Matar Neighborhood, Deraa, Syria

Video shows Syrians in the government held Deraa neighborhood of al-Matar casting their ballots at a polling station in the al-Oumawiyin Elementary School.

Speakers:

Ramez Zarzour, Head of Polling Station:
“Whoever wants to vote can take the voting ballot and enter the secret room, or he can do the procedure here in front of people. He chooses his candidate and votes for him. Many people came today. Even though we are suffering from difficult situations many people still came in”.

Ramia Ibrahim, Resident:
“Today I voted with my free will, and by that we would be applying the concept of democracy they [the international community] were referring to, but of course in our own way, not theirs...not the way of blood and destruction. Today we started building Syria and we will keep going. I voted for the person who will build Syria and we will be behind him”.

Ahmad al-Fares, Resident:
“We came here today to ensure our belonging to this country, to Syria. [We came] to ensure our loyalty to this country, and to say 'yes' to the presidential election”.