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The Waste Collectors of Dandora Dump
Nairobi, Kenya
By Serene Yordi
15 Aug 2013

The Dandora dumpsite, located few kilometres away from the Nairobi city centre and in middle of the Dandora and Korogocho slums, is an old quarry that was supposed to be used temporarily. Forty years later, it still exists. Even though many international organizations have warned about the health threat posed by the dumpsite, the Nairobi City Council has not been able to find a new location to allocate it.

Every day the dumpsite receives around 850 tonnes of garbage (around 310000 annually), which still represents only less than a half of the rubbish generated in the city. An average of 200 trucks unload garbage coming from almost every corner of the city, including industries and hospitals, which means that the waste doesn't have the appropriate treatment before being thrown away.

Many studies have reported the presence of heavy metals both in the dumpsite and in the Nairobi River, which flow along the tip and it is used by the residents of Dandora and Korogocho for cleaning and agricultural purposes. It’s also very common to find needles and surgical razor blades, which represent a danger for the informal waste pickers who scavenge for every valuable item that can be resold afterwards to recycling companies or in the street markets.

There’s no official data, but the estimations show that at least between one and two thousands of people go there every day to search for plastic, glass, electronics, meat bones and scrap metal. Most of them are unemployed people coming from surrounding areas, namely Dandora and Korogocho. Over the years, it has become their only chance to earn some money.

It’s not a lucrative business though, because they usually only get 2Ksh per kilo of glass and 24Ksh per kilo of plastic. In a good day most of them can earn from 200Ksh to 400Ksh. Scrap metal is one of the most coveted items thanks to its high price, but it also poses a huge threat because the easiest way to find it is by burning the heaps of garbage. The process exposes the waste pickers to the toxic fumes emanating from the piles and usually they have no means to buy the necessary equipment to work in a dumpsite.

Police sources say that the place is quite dangerous for strangers and they can’t go down there without the authorisation of the self-appointed leaders of the dumpsite. The Nairobi City Council is responsible of garbage collection in the city, but it has no means to manage the dumpsite with its own resources and therefore it allows the presence of the informal waste pickers, who are quite much cheaper that hiring staff.

The NCC contributes with the heavy machinery needed to stir the garbage and in exchange every truck going inside the dumpsite is charged with a fee of 100Ksh per unloaded tonne (an easy calculation gives the approximate amount of Ksh31m per year, around 270,000 Euros).

There was a plan to relocate the dumpsite in a place near the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport, but the Kenya Airports Authority (KAA) and the National Environmental Management Authority (NEMA) stopped it because of the massive presence of storks that also scavenge for some leftovers. They said that these birds could cause security problems to the air traffic and therefore asked to find a new location, which has not been identified so far.

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Aquaponics in Egypt
Cairo, Egypt
By Serene Yordi
22 Jun 2013

Water in the desert is a scarce and valuable resource. When it must sustain an ever-growing population, it becomes even more valuable. Two young enterprising farmers in Cairo, Egypt recognize this, and have built a small farm with efficiency and sustainability in mind. In the sandy outskirts of Egypt's bustling capital, an aquaponics farm has set up shop. Combining the practices of hydroponics and aquaculture, the farm employs a closed water cycle to both grow fish and plants. In doing so, they use 90% less water than traditional farming techniques used by their Egyptian counterparts. This system aims to mimic the efficiency of the natural environment, where water sources can sustain multiple species of plants and animals in a small area. They have big aspirations for this type of farming, and hope that more farmers will see the benefits of reduced water use and turn to aquaponics. The duo have caught the eye of local restaurants and business magazines alike, and also sell their produce in a budding farmer's market in Cairo's trendy Zamalek district.

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Twin Explosions in Tripoli, Lebanon
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Serene Yordi
25 Aug 2013

Volunteers in Tripoli organized a cleaning effort after the two explosions rocked the city on August 22, 2013.

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Inside the War on Wildlife Crime
Central Africa and East Asia
By Serene Yordi
27 Aug 2012

Wildlife trafficking in Africa has become a major source of finance for armed groups and criminal networks. In countries like Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Sudan and Kenya, poachers move across borders with near impunity.

Governments like Gabon are becoming increasingly alarmed by the threat posed by wildlife trafficking to national security. Rebel groups, drug syndicates and even terrorist networks have seen an opportunity to profit from a low risk, high reward criminal enterprise. To safeguard its remaining elephants, Gabon President Ali Bongo has quadrupled the number of park rangers in the country. Bongo also presided over the burning of $10 million of illegal Ivory seized from poachers, to ensure that none leaked back into the illegal trade.

On the other end of the trade, the final products are nearly unrecognizable. Jewelry and amulets made from ivory are sold in up-scale, air conditioned Thai boutiques whilst other animal parts are used in traditional medicines.

Wildlife crime not only threatens nature’s most iconic species, but exacerbates poverty and corruption, funding an entire spectrum of related international crime. These images trace the story from beginning to end, across continents, offering a sense of the fragility of the human lives that lie in its wake.

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Zahida Kazmi: Pakistan's First Female...
Pakistan
By Serene Yordi
08 Aug 2013

Zahida Kazmi is Pakistan's first and only female taxi driver. In 1992 at the age of 33, Zahida Kazmi lost her husband. In order to support her six children, she decided to become a taxi driver. Her conservative and patriarchal family first disapproved of her career choice, but despite their criticism, she decided to buy herself a taxi. In two decades, Kazmi has driven her taxi from the streets of Islamabad to the most recluse regions of the country. She says her initial fears have disappeared and she has since gained a good reputation as a driver. Now, she has even become the chairperson of Pakistan's yellow cab association.

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Relief Operations in Laguna
Laguna, Philippines
By Serene Yordi
21 Aug 2013

Office of Vice President Jejomar Binay together with the volunteers from Project Michelangelo Foundation distributed packed meals to victims of flooding in Binan and San Pedro, Laguna, Philippines on August 21, 2012.

Because of Typhoon Trami and southwest monsoons, there are a lot of families living in evacuation centers.

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Kazakh Dissident's Family Deportation...
Kazakhastan
By Serene Yordi
16 Aug 2013

Alma Shalabayeva, wife of controversial Kazakh oligarch Mukhtar Ablyazov, and her six-year-old daughter were rapidly deported back to Kazakhstan on May 31 after a night raid on their villa in Rome, Italy, despite the fact that they both had valid visas to stay in the European Union. The government of Kazakhstan accused her of possessing unlawfully obtained passports. Additionally, the unusually fast 72-hour deportation caused a furor of criticism against Italian authorities, as the fact that Shalabayeva could face persecution and even torture upon her return to the country from which she and her husband fled. Ablyazov is a former minister turned dissident in Kazakhstan who started an opposition movement in the country in 2001. He later headed up BTA Bank and continued to fund opposition groups. The bank was nationalized in 2009 and Ablyazov was accused of embezzling billions of dollars. He fled the country, fearing for his life, and obtained political asylum in Britain in 2011. But after he was tipped off by UK police that his life was in danger again, he went into hiding. Some critics say that the treatment of his wife and daughter by Italy were a favor to the oil-rich country of Kazakhstan.

Alma is now in Almaty, after her arrest in Italy and deportation. She does not leave her house and is protected by few relatives and controlled by the Kazakh security services. She defends her husband and longs to leave the country and go back to Europe. Mukthar Ablyazov has been arrested in France, and is waiting the decision of the French authorities. This reportage from the heart of Central Asia makes an in-depth enquiry of the true story of the dissident-banker, seen from the eyes of his wife and of the Kazakh Minister of Foreign Affairs.

To read article, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/21395
To view videos, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/21445 , http://transterramedia.com/media/21446

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Elevated Subway Stations in New York
New York, USA
By Serene Yordi
15 Apr 2013

In New York the subway is often the second thing, after the skyline, visitors encounter and remember. For locals it’s both a blessing, fast and convenient, and a curse, overcrowded and noisy.

Immigration had changed New York during the first part of the 19th century when residents flooded Manhattan island creating a need for more public transport capacity than steamboats circling the island could provide. The first elevated line was constructed in 1867-70 (In 1870 a prototype underground subway was built but not finalized) along Greenwich Street and Ninth Avenue. Later more lines were built on 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 9th Avenue, all managed by Interborough Rapid Transit(IRT), an independent private company.

Outside New York (Brooklyn, Long island, Queens and parts of Bronx were not part of New York until 1898) the main train developments were connected to Coney Island, a major seaside resort for New Yorkers. In order to draw more visitors, the different resorts initiated funding of train-lines to Coney island with the first service starting in 1864, first as a horse-drawn line but from 1867 a steam railroad. Due to the commercial driven reasons for building the railways there were numerous lines owned by different companies with different rail sizes and specifications. This was changed in 1896, when the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Corporation (BRT), a holding company, came into existence, and by 1900 had taken over all lines in Brooklyn and Queens.

The first underground line was opened on October 27, 1904, going up and down 9th avenue (from City Hall to Bronx) on Manhattan. It was the start of a rapid expansion. The majority of the present-day subway system was either built or improved during the following 30 years. The city outsourced the expansion to BRT and the IRT but later, after the political claims that IRT and BRT were reaping profits at taxpayer expense, started a new system called IND (first called Independent City-Owned Subway but later changed to IND to follow the three-letter initialisms of the other systems) with first line starting operating on September 10, 1932.. All IND lines, except a short elevated one, were underground subways in Brooklyn, Bronx and Manhattan. In 1920 the last elevated subway-station was build in Brooklyn.

In 1940, the two private lines (BMT and IRT) were bought by the city. Most elevated lines were closed, especially on Manhattan, only leaving some in the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens.

Today there are 468 stations, the highest number in the world, with 337 km of tracks across 4 of 5 boroughs (there is a line on Staten Island but not included under the New York Subway system) of New York. In 2012, the subway delivered over 1.65 billion rides,making it the seventh busiest rapid transit rail system in the world. Contrary to its name,but indicative of its history, the New York City Subway system is not entirely underground but has 40% at or above ground.

Elevated substations and lines offer sweeping views of the shore and the skyline and the roads and houses beneath them. New Yorkers and some tourist know how to take a scenic mini-vacation every day: on the elevated subway lines in Queens, Brooklyn and Bronx.

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The Human Cost of India's School-Lunc...
Bihar, India
By Serene Yordi
19 Jul 2013

On the morning of July 17, school lunch was served at a primary school in Bihar's Dharmasti Gandaman village. However, the food served that day was laced with agricultural insecticides. In the following days, 23 children died. Many others were hospitalized from the poisoning.

The mid day meal program was introduced in 1925 for the underprivileged children in Madras ( now Chennai) and by 1998, the program was introduced all over India. More than 100 million children are covered in the India’s mid-day meal program and is by the far the largest mid-day meal programs in the world. Now, this tragic event has shined a light on issues with food safety and hygiene in food preparation in the country.

The photojournalist captured the human cost of this tragedy, mothers and fathers, and a devastated village. Ramananda Rai, a 35-year-old father who lost his five-year-old daughter Kajol, had enrolled all three of his children in the same school. The other two survived, as they didn’t go to school that day to assist him working in the fields. Now he does not want to send them back. Many of the inhabitants say they will never be the same.

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Daily Life In Rabaa Camp in Egypt
Cairo, Egypt
By Serene Yordi
09 Aug 2013

Before Egypt's security forces cleared the largest Muslim Brotherhood sit-in in Rabaa al-Adawiya in Cairo on August 14, pro-Mohammed Morsi supporters had been camped out there for six weeks in support of the ousted president. Tens of thousands had come together to organize the camp for daily living, down to sanitation and the creation of kitchens, a media center, hospital, pharmacies and even a lost and found office.

Daily life was characterized by intense community moments discussing the news, attending speeches by political figures, eating and praying. Protesters have been living for more than 40 days in the tens that have been erected in order to create the huge protest, that housed the people who asked for the reinstatement of Morsi and to restore democracy after what they call a coup against the votes of the Egyptian people.

Passing the walls that protect the camp on the side of the Sadat Memorial on Nasr Road there was graffiti, and the area right before the camp pinpointed with small circles of stones where people put flowers, marking where protesters died on July 28th clashes. Muslim men and women in traditional clothes made up most of the people, but there was also a significant presence of young Egyptians in casual clothes and children everywhere.

Now, after security shut down the two sit-ins in Cairo, little remains of the burnt-out Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque which sat at the center of the camp. In the wake of the violence that ensued, more than 500 people were killed and 3,700 injured in the capital and throughout the country, according to Egypt's Health Ministry.

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Bengali Fishermen
Chittagong, Bangladesh
By Serene Yordi
15 Aug 2013

Karnaphuli (Karnafuli), the largest and most important river in Chittagong and the Chittagong Hill Tracts, is a 667 metres (2,188 ft)-wide river in the south-eastern part of Bangladesh. Originating from the Lushai hills in Mizoram, India, it flows 270 km (170 mi) southwest through Chittagong Hill Tracts and Chittagong into the Bay of Bengal. A large hydroelectric power plant using Karnaphuli river was built in the Kaptai region during the 1960s. The mouth of the river hosts Chittagong's sea port, the main port of Bangladesh.

To view article, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/21279

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Italians of Bedford
Bedford, United Kingdom
By Serene Yordi
12 Jan 2011

This is the story of many men and women who chased the dream of a new life from Italy to Bedford.

During the 1950s in Italy, particularly the poorer regions of the south, did not have easy times. World War II raised the unemployment throughout the country, causing a tragic economic crisis.The Italian government, alarmed by such situation, tried to solve the problem. Many Italians from the south decided that the best thing to do was to migrate where they could find what they could not achieve at home — a job and a house.

The aim of this story is to portray such people who took part at the huge migration to England, in the city of Bedford. The city is known for its industrial area, precisely for its brick factories that are said have reconstructed London after the heavy WWII bombings. Many people avoided these jobs in the brick factories, as it was extremely hard and tiring, causing an urgent need for labor. In order to solve this crisis, the British government, within the accord of the Italian government, sent representatives of Bedford’s brick companies ti Italy to recruit about 800 young and robust men from the south regions of Sicily and Campania, giving them a four-year contract.

Bedford’s Italian community is now fully integrated with British culture, and with its three generations, is the largest concentration of Italians in Britian, one-fifth of the population.

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Daily Life After the Spring in Yemen
Sanaa, Yemen
By Serene Yordi
01 Aug 2013

A picture of daily life in Yemen after early 2011 when the Yemeni youth took the streets and forced the ouster of Yemen’s autocratic President, Ali Abdullah Saleh. Yemen, one of the poorest countries in the Arab World, is now experiencing a transition rife with political corruption, unemployment, a real proliferation of AQAP (Al Qaida in the Arab Peninsula) and a depletion of natural resources. But though Yemen continues to feel the consequences post-revolution, people carry on their day to day work, traditional and holiday celebrations, as well as protests in the streets. The photographer documented this everyday existence over the course of a year in Yemen.

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Displaced Fight Land-Grabbing in Bang...
Noakhali, Bangladesh
By Serene Yordi
06 Jun 2013

Land is an increasingly rare resource in Bangladesh. Over sixty percent of the country’s population of 150 million depend on agriculture to make its living, yet the majority of Bangladesh’s cultivable land belongs to 10 percent of the people.
Each year hundreds are displaced by climate change and make their way to Noakhali District in pursuit of government promised khasland. Yet in a system rife with corruption, very little of this land ever materializes. Left landless, the poor farmers of Noakhali are forced to band together and fend for themselves.

To view article, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/21242

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Syrian Refugees in Iraq
Domeez, Iraq
By Serene Yordi
27 Jul 2013

Due to the conflict in Syria, hundreds of thousands of refugees fled to neighboring countries. Many of them reached Northern Iraq and found refuge in the camp Domeez near the city of Dohuk. Now almost 60.000 refugees live there. The Kurdish Government, the UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) as well as several other international organizations provide drinking water, food and medical care. There are also three schools. But since refugees are constantly arriving at the camp, the situation is getting worse.

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The Ancient Arabian Island of Socotra
Socotra, Yemen
By Serene Yordi
01 Nov 2012

Photos by Juan Herrero

Socotra, an island 250 miles off the coast of Yemen, is one of a kind. This ancient land mass is home to more than a thousand plant and animal species found nowhere else on Earth, numbers rivaled only by the Galapagos Islands and Hawaii.

Dragon blood trees, rare birds and fish live among the equally ancient inhabitants of Socotra. The people are considered to be a mixture of African, Greek, Portuguese and Arab, and speak an archaic, unwritten language, which was spoken in pre-Islamic Arabia for many centuries. 

Though the Socotran lifestyle has been very traditional, sustainable and virtually self-sufficient, the island has become more traveler-friendly, promoting eco-tourism that preserves the unusual environment. 

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Burn Clinic Struggles for Survival in...
Samalout, Egypt
By Serene Yordi
23 Mar 2013

The political upheaval of Egypt has not stopped Sister Reyes, 68, and her small team from spending their days treating up to 90 burn victims per day in the rural area of Samalout. In the summer, the numbers reach up to 250. Though Reyes, the driving force behind the clinic’s success, yearns to now return home after 47 years of work, she fears that the cash-strapped clinic will close if she leaves.

With a staff of 12, none of them doctors, and a budget of only $340 a month, the employees have little to work with. Many patients pay little for medical care and those who cannot afford it get it for free. A majority of people in the impoverished governate live in tiny homes, sleeping and cooking in the same overcrowded rooms. Accidents are common. As it is an area with a high number of agricultural workers, many victims also suffer chemical burns. Reyes and her team cannot get many of the drugs in Egypt and rely on people who leave the country to bring it back to replenish their ever-strained stocks. The nun hopes all their efforts will be enough as she can’t bear the thought of it failing if she leaves. “This is my life,” she says.

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Escape to Egypt
Cairo, Egypt
By Serene Yordi
14 Jun 2013

Oromo refugees that have fled Ethiopia for the safety of Egypt in order to escape persecution by their current government are now facing danger once again. Over the past months, there has been an emergence of xenophobic attacks against Ethiopians on the streets of Cairo, motivated by Ethiopia's goal to build the “Grand Renaissance Dam.” The Ethiopian government is planning to dam the Blue Nile for hydroelectric power, a move Egypt worries will negatively affect their water supply.

"They said if you take our water, we will take your blood," said Abdi Harboury, an Oromo refugee, who was evicted by his landlord after the dam controversy began. Though the refugees came together to protest in front of UNHCR’s office in Cairo, the agency can do little to help keep them safe. The population fears continued attacks and discrimination if the water issue is not resolved.

To view article, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/21012

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Tunisia Rallies and Unrest
Tunisia, Africa
By Serene Yordi
31 Jul 2013

SInce the beginning of Occupy Bardo on 26th July thousands of people joined the sit in and the protesters to ask the resignation of Ennahda party and the fall of the National Constituent Assembly.

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Africa Fashion Week in London
London, United Kingdom
By Serene Yordi
01 Aug 2013

The vibrant colors of the one of the diverse continents in the world were splashed across runways in London from August 1 - 3, at the third annual African Fashion Week London. Over 50 of African and African-inspired best and boldest designers from all over the world showcased their innovative new styles. African Fashion Week premiered in 2011 and is considered the "biggest African event of its kind in Africa." Africa's burgeoning fashion industry is quickly gaining a prominence as a global fashion hub and an untapped market. August 2013.

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Peace Tour with Mohammad Assaf
West Bank, Palestine
By Serene Yordi
04 Aug 2013

"Arab Idol" winner Mohammad Assaf visits the Nativity church with the FC Barcelona football team during their Peace Tour. He also performed in front of 20,000 Palestinians, who came from across the West Bank to see FC Barcelona team train in Dura stadium.

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Italy Under Eviction
Milan, Italy
By Serene Yordi
26 Jul 2013

This is the story about the families of migrants and Italians facing the crisis with unemployment, high costs of life, and the precarious situation of losing the basic right to housing.

Technically, it’s called “guilty arrearage” and ends in eviction because of the poverty of the inhabitants. In 2013 in Italy 250.000 families risk this to happen to them, that’s an average of 140 evictions a day, almost 6 each hour. In the following years this phenomenon could even be more widespread due to the abolition of public support (“Fondo sostegno affitto nazionale”), which has been helping more than 350.000 families pay their rents. Even as the pressure on housing in the social emergency rise some 5.000 public houses remain empty, waiting to be surveyed and brought up to standard to be inhabited, and that’s just in the city of Milan.

I’ve built a close relation with several families and followed their stories from the notification of eviction to the day itself and being pushed out. Often the police and legal officers prevent me doing my work so I turn my focus to the other aspects of these stories, particulars that can reveal the dramatic experiences going on in these families lives. After the eviction, in fact, some families were rehoused temporarily, others went to cheeap hotels with the support of the municipality, but many others had no other choice than to sleep on the street while they await decisions being made on access to public social housing (which they have right to).

Many stories are focused on women who had only a part time jobs or no job at all, like Letizia, Maria, Cadija, Edy, Pina, Genny and Pina Cortese who we see in my photographs, all struggling to pay their rent, many have lost that battle already.
Cadija is from Morocco, she’s been living in Italy for 8 years. She’s unemployed and has a 17 years-old son. Cadija has already received three eviction notifications. Cadija has not received news of her husband, a Syrian national who went back to his homeland before the war started. She lost her job and now she hopes to received public social housing before eviction day.
Letizia experienced eviction in January. She has a 15 years-old daughter and her part time income does not allow her to pay the full rent. After the eviction she received a small flat to live, thanks to a local community association, but this solution is temporary and she hopes to receive full public social housing soon.
Maria has lost her job recently and was evicted from her home two months ago. Now she’s hosted in an emergency shelter run by a local organization. Edy was evicted last December and has a new born baby girl only a few months old. The society for whom she was working did not pay her salary for many months and in few months time her contract will change from full time to part time so her salary will decrease. Now she is staying at a friend’s apartment.
Pina is living at the first floor of a building without an elevator, she is severly disabled and has received her eviction notice.
Genny is living in the same building. She has no regular job and she has a chiold with special physical needs who can not live with her because of the lack of facilities in the house. She is expecting eviction soon.
Pina Cortese is 28 years old and she works in a shop in the city centre. A local committee of inhabitants protested and halted her eviction for the moment.

There are also stories of people who leave the country they have chosenre-migration to return to their place of birth, because of the lost of job and housing. This is the case for Peppe, a 53 year-old man living in the North of Italy for many years and now returning to Naples because of the loss of his job, the difficulty to find a new one, and the eviction that happened last January.
A similar story is that of a family from Egypt who have been living in Italy for the past 8 years. When Mohamed lost his job and his wife lost her permit to stay because she lost her job too, they decided to return to Egypt, just few days before they were evicted.

The families with many members are the most vulnerable, families of up to 6 often live in a 40 square metre apartment with little or no means to apply to public housing to relocate. The Mauhay family, Arnold, Mardy and their children Adrian, Alessa and Angel, were living in a house in the north of Milan. The building was very badly maintained, the stairs had no lights and the dangerous electric wiring affected their house. After their eviction they are living in a hotel with the support of the municipality.
Valeria and Mario were the guardians of a villa belongiong to a rich family in Milan. After they lost their jobs they found themselves, at the age of 60 unemployed like their two 30-year-old sons. After the eviction they are seeking support from a local organization.
Kumara and Mary are, as many others, victims of the illegal rent black marke). As they are undocumented migrants it is impossible for them to register without permits for a housing contract. When they tried to ask to the house owner to give them a proper lease he increase the rent. They were unable to pay and soon after received an eviction notification. Now Kumara is living in his car, and Mary is hosted in a protection housing with their son, Nathaka.
Flavio, Rosaria and Nancy are a young family. Flavio has no regular job and Rosaria is a teacher with an unstable contract. Two months ago a committee of local residents protested their evicition and won a temporary stay for the family.
The Al Badaui family is composed of Ayman and Abir, Maram, Mariam, Mohamed and the little Samer. Abir does not speak Italian and takes care of the house and family while Ayman works as a cleaner at the airport. When his working hours were reduced he became unable to pay his rent so they received an eviction notification. The committee of residents in their block organized a sit-in and their eviction has been postponed. The family has some chance to receive a public social house, but, as Ayman told me, the solidarity his family has received from the local residents has given them the most support, restoring their strength and their sense of humanity.

For a more selective photo essay, click here: http://www.transterramedia.com/collections/1324

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Brazil, The Largest Catholic Country ...
Aparecida, Brazil
By Serene Yordi
26 Jul 2013

Many faithful pilgrims spent the night outside the Shrine of Aparecida waiting for a place close to the Pope Francisco. According to them, this is a test of faith and perseverance.

The number of people aged 16 and over who declare themselves Catholics in Brazil dropped from 64% in 2007 to 57%, the lowest number ever recorded in the history of the country.

Latin America is at a crossroads and at the same time, the promise of a future for the church, they say. The "monopoly" religion of Catholicism is being eroded by evangelical religions - especially Pentecostals - and secularism, rejection or indifference to religion.

At the time that the mass did not speak Portuguese, Brazilian and catholic were almost synonymous. In the first census, in 1872, that it was the official religion of the country was followed by 99.7% of the population.

Throughout most of the history of Brazil, the churches were the greatest symbol of wealth. Brazilian cities grew around Catholic churches. Nowadays, the outside world is very different.

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Embedded with M23 Rebels in the DRC
Democratic Republic of Congo
By Serene Yordi
15 Jun 2013

In light of the ultimatum issued by the United Nations to the rebels forces in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to leave Goma or face "the use of force," this is an inside look documented by embedded journalists of the North Kivu conflict from the perspective of M23. Included are interviews with Bertrand Bisimwa, M23 political leader, who rejects the government's prior call for peace, as well as Colonel Innocent Kaina, 2nd in Command and Head of Operations. There is raw footage from Rutshuru with M23 rebels available as well.

When the rebels took control of Goma in November 2012, the government asked them to withdraw and promised a negotiation. However, their form of negotiation resulted in an intervention brigade, authorized by the UN Security Council, which Bisimwa states was used as a form of an attack on the rebel group. He denies that the government sincerely wanted to make peace with the M23 rebels, and says if the government decides to attack in the future, the rebels have no choice but to defend themselves.

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Bitter Oranges - African Migrant Work...
Rosarno, Italy
By Serene Yordi
29 Jul 2013

Most African migrants and refugees who enter Europe through Lampedusa end up working on the fruit and vegetable plantations in southern Italy. Every year around Christmas thousands of migrant workers pick oranges for a hunger wage in the village of Rosarno, Calabria.

For the rest of the year not much work is available in Rosarno, but some people earned so little that they can not afford the journey to another region to find work for the rest of the year. They stay all year around, barely having enough to eat during the long hot summer months where very little work is available.

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Flash Floods in China
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By Serene Yordi
19 Jul 2013

Recent torrential rains and flash flooding in Kunming have caused over 84 million Yuan ($13.6 million) in damage to the city, with one person missing, according to initial reports from the Yunnan Provincial Department of Civil Affairs. The flood affected over 77,000 Kunming residents, while testing the city’s drainage system and its infrastructure. The north and east of the city appeared to be two of the worst impacted areas which faced major traffic standstills after the flooding. This year, the Yunnan province has experienced historically high rainfall levels, causing dozens of fatalities and millions of dollars in damage.

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Fashion in Nigeria
Lagos, Nigeria
By Serene Yordi
21 Oct 2012

Nigeria’s growing talent in the fashion industry was on display during Lagos MTN Fashion and Design Week in October. For the first time Nigeria saw high-end European buyers such as Selfridges $Co, MyTheresa.com attend. British designer Matthew Williamson rounded up the show with a recent collection and many talented Nigerian designers showcased their work.

Nigeria is a developing country with less than most of the population living on $1 a day. Most of the countries economy is based in oil exports, however Nigeria country is beginning to tap into and value its creative potential. This comes at a time when a middle class is rapidly growing and more Nigerians have disposable income. Nigeria is becoming noticed internationally as buyers around the world are increasingly attending these fashion shows and taking on board some of the talented Nigerian designers.

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Being a gay journalist in Hong Kong
Hong Kong, China
By Serene Yordi
10 Jan 2013

Things are changing in Hong Kong since the city has become a part of China. Josh is a Hong Kong gay journalist who is afraid of what might happen in the future, for now he is a victim of censorship that affects his profession and his privacy. His desire is to scape from Hong Kong.

To view video, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/20731
To view article, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/20225

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Castaway
Galicia, Spain
By Serene Yordi
18 Jul 2012

Goose barnacle fishermen, “percebeiros,” risk a rocky death daily in their quest to catch percebes, Spain’s most expensive shellfish on Galicia’s northwestern coast, Costa da Morte. This dangerous profession is a time-honored one, having been passed within fishing families for hundreds of years.

Not all were willing to chance their lives on the “Coast of Death” though, and turned to jobs like construction to make a living. But after Spain spiraled into an economic crisis, and unemployment skyrocketed, these jobs disappeared and many were forced back to the dangerous life of a percebeiro.

Most of these photos were taken in village of Aguino in Spain. This small community has around 80 to 100 “legal” goose barnacle fishermen, though an increase in the price for a permit has also forced some to hunt for the prized crustaceans illegally at night. The perilous perceberio life on the Atlantic Ocean, scaling rocks and facing tsunami-like waves, is filled with memories of lost comrades at sea. They rely on good luck, the Virgin of the Sea and the mercy of the dangerous waters to make it through each day.

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For Clan and Country
Hargeisa, Somalia
By Serene Yordi
18 Jul 2013

Somaliland is the breakaway Somali state seeking independence after decades of bloody civil war and terror. Its capital city Hargeisa is booming, and expats are returning to start businesses after years in exodus.

But Somaliland is still deeply riven across clan lines, that often spill into violence which threaten its image as the peaceful antithesis of terror-torn Mogadishu, from whom the state clamours for independence.

Football may be the answer. And this year's year's 'Regional', aka 'Clan', Cup Final, which pitted two tribal groups from Hargeisa against each other amid a chaotic atmosphere in the capital's 15,000-plus capacity stadium, wasn't just a chance to play out tribal rivalries in peace. It was a statement that Somaliland can police itself and promote sport without help from Somalia, the UN or any other outsiders.

"Somaliland is desperate for recognition," says Jamal Alon, a British-Somalilander who helped organise this year's final. "It's days like this that show it can be recognised through football, and sport in general.

"This is Mo Farah's birthplace so there's tons of sporting talent here. Come to Hargeisa, see the city and bring your scouts!"

Media created

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METL GROUP - TANZANIA 6
Dar es Salaam
By Serene Yordi
12 Mar 2014

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - 12MAR14 - Mo sugar, in the shelf of TSN Supermarket in the Upanga neighbourhood of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on March 12, 2014. Mohammed Enterprises Tanzania Limited (MeTL) operates in a range of sectors including agriculture, real estate, energy and distribution. On it's website, MeTL Group claims to contribute over three percent of Tanzania's GDP. Photo by Daniel Hayduk

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METL GROUP - TANZANIA 5
Dar es Salaam
By Serene Yordi
12 Mar 2014

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - 12MAR14 - Mo sugar, in the shelf of TSN Supermarket in the Upanga neighbourhood of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on March 12, 2014. Mohammed Enterprises Tanzania Limited (MeTL) operates in a range of sectors including agriculture, real estate, energy and distribution. On it's website, MeTL Group claims to contribute over three percent of Tanzania's GDP. Photo by Daniel Hayduk

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METL GROUP - TANZANIA 1
Dar es Salaam
By Serene Yordi
12 Mar 2014

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - 12MAR14 - A man delivers Masafi water, which is owned by the MeTL Group, to an apartment building in the Upanga neighbourhood of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on March 12, 2014. Mohammed Enterprises Tanzania Limited (MeTL) operates in a range of sectors including agriculture, real estate, energy and distribution. On it's website, MeTL Group claims to contribute over three percent of Tanzania's GDP. Photo by Daniel Hayduk

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METL GROUP - TANZANIA 4
Dar es Salaam
By Serene Yordi
12 Mar 2014

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - 12MAR14 - A shopkeeper sells a Pride soft drink, which is owned by MeTL Group, in the Upanga neighbourhood of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on March12, 2014. Mohammed Enterprises Tanzania Limited (MeTL) operates in a range of sectors including agriculture, real estate, energy and distribution. On it's website, MeTL Group claims to contribute over three percent of Tanzania's GDP. Photo by Daniel Hayduk

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METL GROUP - TANZANIA 2
Dar es Salaam
By Serene Yordi
12 Mar 2014

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - 12MAR14 - A Pride soft drink, which is owned by MeTL Group, in a shop in the Upanga neighbourhood of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on March12, 2014. Mohammed Enterprises Tanzania Limited (MeTL) operates in a range of sectors including agriculture, real estate, energy and distribution. On it's website, MeTL Group claims to contribute over three percent of Tanzania's GDP. Photo by Daniel Hayduk

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METL GROUP - TANZANIA 3
Dar es Salaam
By Serene Yordi
12 Mar 2014

Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - 12MAR14 - A Masafi water, which is owned by the MeTL Group, delivery truck drives through the Upanga neighbourhood of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on March 12, 2014. Mohammed Enterprises Tanzania Limited (MeTL) operates in a range of sectors including agriculture, real estate, energy and distribution. On it's website, MeTL Group claims to contribute over three percent of Tanzania's GDP. Photo by Daniel Hayduk