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Collections created

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Skiing at the Top of Lebanon
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
17 Jan 2015

With 18 lifts and 18 kilometers of slopes, Mzaar Kfardebian is one of the biggest ski resorts in the Middle East. Located between 1600 and 2 800 meters of altitude and only 44 kilometers north from Beirut, the station is also one of Lebanon’s greatest open secrets. It host up to 100 000 visitors each year, including many tourists from Arab countries. “Lebanon is special because the sea is very close to the slopes. In April, you can go skiing in the morning and to the beach in the afternoon”, explains Christian Rizk, Executive Director of the station, proudly. “Mzaar Kfardebian can be compared to a small ski resort in Europe”, he adds. Open since the beginning of the sixties, Mzaar Kfardebian was developed into a modern resort in 1992, after the end of the Lebanese Civil War (1975-1991). It’s owners have since then invested millions of dollars to make it as modern as any ski resort in the Alps, although the resort has kept its Middle Eastern charm, with visitors tanning while enjoying a shisha and playing “dabke” (traditional Lebanese drum) at the bottom of the slopes.

Article available upon request in English and French.

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Christians of Iran
Tehran, Iran
By Andreanewilliams
27 Aug 2011

The Islamic Republic of Iran recognizes freedom of worship for Christians. In the country the community is divided between 50.000 Armenians and 10 thousand Assyrians. Before 1979, year of the Islamic Revolution, Christians were two millions. Today they live in small towns and villages (as Urmia, Ahvaz, Pataver, Salmas) and in specific neighborhoods in large cities (such as Vanak in Tehran and Jolfa in Isfahan). Since decades the diaspora of this communities is going on to Europe and United States, perceived as rich, free and secure places. The life, public and private, of who remains is entirely within the religious community: job, public cerimonies, marriage, education. As in a ghetto.

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Marc Dhaenen
Morocco
By Andreanewilliams
21 Feb 2013

Belgian press card holder until 2010.
Moroccan press card holder 2011 and 2012.
2013 Moroccan press card holder, with qualification and registration as a director and
cameramen.

Graduate high school commercial (equivalent BAC-PRO), the ILMV Brussels -
Belgium.

University Studies: Social Sciences - Psychology, Sociology and Anthropology (3 A
level), University College Nanaimo - Canada. (Free Foreign student)

Certificate of sports coaching and teaching, issued by the Office of National Youth
Assistance in Belgium.

Certificate management skills, issued by the Union of Middle Classes in Belgium.

Professional Experience:
- Freelance Journalist-: Belgian press 1983-1986. - TV RTL-TVI Belgium - Assistant Director - 1986-1989. - Radio NRJ Chamonix - Journalist Presenter - 1990. - Le Dauphine Libere - Correspondent Freelance Chamonix - 1991. - CBS Radio - Whitehorse - Canada - Head of issue - 1991. - The Journal Franco - Edmonton - Canada - Correspondent - 1992. - Radio Canada - Edmonton - Journalist Presenter - 1993-94. - Journal Le Soir - Belgium - Journalist Editor - 1994-96. - Group Ciné-Revue - Belgium - Chief Editor of the magazine Cape Adventure - 1996-98.

  • Radio Bel RTL - Belgium - Responsible for issuing and presenter - 1998-2005.
  • News-Magazine - Belgium - Editor in Chief - 2006-2010.
  • The Journal of Opinion - Morocco - Special Envoy - 2010-2012.
  • THR Magazine (Tourism, Hotel and Catering) - Morocco - Responsible Tourism and Sport - Creator Magazine Web Edition - 2010-2012.
  • Creator of Agadir WebTV-i-Tele.
  • Creator of online magazine and WebTv Osho-Mag
  • Lecturer in Audiovisual and Media Teaching Assistant at the Faculty of Ouarzazate polydisciplinary (OPS). From 2010 to 2011.
  • Supervised Internship audiovisual ISMC Ouarzazate. (2011-2012).
  • Trainer audiovisual approved CANON Morocco. (2011-2012).
  • Audiovisual Teacher at the School of Radio and Television of Agadir. (2012-13).
  • Teacher at the Institute of Audiovisual & Journalism Agadir (2012-13).
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Tibetan Refugees
Tibet
By Andreanewilliams
20 Aug 2012

Every year, hundreds of Tibetans make their way to the Tibetan Refugee Reception Centre in Kathmandu, Nepal, seeking to escape religious and cultural repression by the Chinese government. Crossing the border to reach Nepal can be a very costly endeavor – with guides being paid between 12 000 CNY (€1400) and 50 000 CNY (€8500) per person – if it is to be secure. But with the help of their family members, many Tibetans are at least able to attempt it. But the challenge is not only found in meeting these expenses – it is also found in reconciling with leaving family members behind and the uncertainty of the future; oftentimes, it is also found in crossing the physical barriers which divide these two nations; yet, for others, the journey simply consists of a single bus or plane ride. Whatever the reality of the journey is for these Tibetans who have fled their homes – be it dramatic or uneventful - they are all tales of refuge. (Where indicated (*), names have been changed to protect the subject’s identity and that of any friends and family still living in Tibet).

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“WITH TIBET IN SIGHT: A TALE OF ONE M...
Pangong Tso Lake, India
By Andreanewilliams
20 Sep 2012

Nearly 14 000 feet above sea level, on the arid shores of Pangong “Tso” (lake), flies a lone Tibetan flag.

On occasion, travellers manage to make the 5-hour journey here from Leh during the short summer season, stopping at monasteries and roadside yurts along the way. And if they travel as far down the lakeside as possible - without stepping into Chinese territory - to the remote village of Spangmik, they will undoubtedly see it whipping about in the wind.

In democratic India, this flag's presence may seem benign - but on the opposite shore of Pangong Tso’s salty waters, lies Tibet; and just a few kilometers south of Spangmik, lies an army checkpost.

In such close proximity to Tibet, 68-year-old Tsering Dondup is literally flying the Tibetan flag in the face of China.

Pangong Lake sits on the Sino-India Line of Actual Control, with more than 60 per cent of its 134km length being under Chinese control.

Dondup, himself, first arrived in India in 1959 after his parents were killed in clashes with Chinese troops at the height Tibet’s occupation in the 1950s. Initially motivated to avenge the death of his parents, Dondup went on to join the Indian Army in Mussoorie, northern India, in 1968.

Fifteen years later, he met and fell in love with a young woman from Spangmik village. In 1989, they married.

He smacks his lips together and lets out a sigh, as he reflects on his relationship with his wife of 23 years. “My wife may be illiterate, but she loves me so deeply.”

Following his marriage, he became focused on creating a home - in plain sight of Tibet - with his new wife on the rocky banks of Pangong Tso.

But as a reminder of his past, Dondup flies a little piece of his history on the flagpole outside of his home, with the hope of one day returning to Tibet.

“I want to see the birds, the sheep, the horses. I want to see them again," he says. "Are they there, or not? I don’t know."

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Eviction
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By Andreanewilliams
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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Skiing at the top of Lebanon (Video)
Mzaar Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
18 Jan 2015

January 18, 2015
Mzaar Kfardebian, Lebanon

With 18 lifts and 18 kilometers of slopes, Mzaar Kfardebian is one of the biggest ski resorts in the Middle East. Located between 1600 and 2 800 meters of altitude and only 44 kilometers north from Beirut, the station is also one of Lebanon’s greatest open secrets. It host up to 100 000 visitors each year, including many tourists from Arab countries. “Lebanon is special because the sea is very close to the slopes. In April, you can go skiing in the morning and to the beach in the afternoon”, explains Christian Rizk, Executive Director of the station, proudly. “Mzaar Kfardebian can be compared to a small ski resort in Europe”, he adds. Open since the beginning of the sixties, Mzaar Kfardebian was developed into a modern resort in 1992, after the end of the Lebanese Civil War (1975-1991). It’s owners have since then invested millions of dollars to make it as modern as any ski resort in the Alps, although the resort has kept its Middle Eastern charm, with visitors tanning while enjoying a shisha and playing “dabke” (traditional Lebanese drum) at the bottom of the slopes.
Article available upon request in English and French.

TRANSCRIPT:

Christian Rizk: Executive Director of Mzaar Kfardebian (French)

00:33 - 00:51 Mzaar is the biggest ski resort in lebanon and in the Middle East. We can compare it to small ski resorts in Europe. Our security norms are quite high and we try to be look like French ski resorts as much as possible.

00:51 - 1:16 Everything in Lebanon is affected by the [political] situation but so far we were lucky in winter. We were not really affected because the majority of our clientele is Lebanese. We have very few foreigners. Lebanese already know the country and they know if they can come or not. That is why we were not affected.

1:16 - 1:24 We are lucky to have snow and the sea. So in April people come and ski in the morning and go to the beach in the afternoon.

Maher Abu Haidar, Ski instructor (English)

8:57 - 9:11 I used to live in Switzerland, I studied there and I used to ski on a daily basis as well. But the fact that I do not have the beach near me is not the same sensation I do have over here. And plus I have all my friends as you can see.

Wassim Mhanna, Mayor of Kfardebian (English)
9:27 - 9:41 We need the slopes to begin. We need the ski season to begin. The slopes are very important for the people of Lebanon. All the people. When the slopes are gong on, all Lebanon works.

Rami Abou Laba, 25 years old, from Saida. Lives in Oman (English)

10:34 - 10:44 We come here to spend and enjoy our time and play in the snow and make snowmen. We love to ski. Now we are coming trip to enjoy shisha and talking, chatting to each other. To spend time.

10:44 - 11:07 Faraya is the most popular (unknown word) in Lebanon, especially for snowing and skiing. And good place because all Lebanon coming to this place so we can meet everybody here.

Ali Issa (left), Snowboarding instructor, Walid Medawar (right) Founder of Republic of Snowboarding, Mzaar Kfardebian snowboarding school.

12:10 - 12:24 Walid Medawar: What is so cool about snowboarding in Lebanon is that you have lots of sunny days. You can go up, no avalanche risks, nothing dangerous. The slopes are very easy. Maximum blue.

12:24 - 12:25 Ali Issa: We have a couple of blacks.

Walid Medawar: Yeah, couple of blacks...

12:26 - 12:43 Ali Issa: One of the best things about snowboarding in Lebanon is that you have a closed knitted community. Everyone knows each other. You are going to be riding on the slopes, you are going to have tens of people screaming your name, calling you: I want to ride with you! You never ride alone. You ride in groups of twenties. We are a pack of wolves on the slopes.

12:44 - 12:45 Walid Medawar: Privacy is bye bye you know.

12:46 - 13:13 Ali Issa: We live here during the whole winter and we do not feel any of the negativity that the city has. We do not feel any tensions among people. We do not have any of that. I mean, the most we get is the skiers having some bad times with the snowboarders. The snowboarders having some bad time with the skiers but you do not get any fights over here. Everyone is happy. You cannot not smile.

13:14 - 13:24 Walid Medawar: The idea is, in Beirut really, it is like a different country. You are up here, you are isolated from all the news, all the traffic, all that stuff.

13:24 - 13:28 Ali Issa: From all the politicians! I don't see no politicians here, thank god!

13:38 - 13:44 Walid Medawar: So up here you are in the mountains, doing your things. It is not that far away from the city. 30 minutes and you will be here. Different planet. It is a different country.

13:44 - 14: 02 Walid Medawar: Up here it is a different planet seriously. You do not feel the tensions in Beirut, you do not feel the political life you know. You are here you are safe. Skiing here is amazing. Good quality snow. Please come join us!

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Skiing in Lebanon 19
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
17 Jan 2015

Lebanese women are known for their sense of style... even on the slopes.

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Skiing in Lebanon 18
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
17 Jan 2015

A group of people is smoking shisha at the bottom of the slopes.

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Skiing in Lebanon 17
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
17 Jan 2015

Two skiers take a selfie at the top of the slopes.

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Skiing in Lebanon 20
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
16 Jan 2015

A view on the slopes from the top of the mountain.

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Skiing in Lebanon 22
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
17 Jan 2015

A group of people smoking shisha and drinking vodka at the bottom of the slopes.

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Skiing in Lebanon 21
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
17 Jan 2015

Lebanese enjoy smoking shisha at the bottom of the slopes.

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Skiing in Lebanon 23
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
17 Jan 2015

A view of Mzaar Kfardebian Ski Resort from the chair lift.

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Skiing in Lebanon 11
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
10 Jan 2015

People resting and tanning in the bar area, while electronic music is playing in the background.

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Skiing in Lebanon 21
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
11 Jan 2015

A family is playing in the snow, at the bottom of the slopes.

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Skiing in Lebanon 16
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
11 Jan 2015

A bar has been installed at the bottom of the slopes. Lebanese are known for their "joie de vivre" and their taste for partying, even on the slopes!

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Skiing in Lebanon 14
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
11 Jan 2015

Two men are sledging at the bottom of the slopes, among the skiers.

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Skiing in Lebanon 15
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
10 Jan 2015

A couple is having its picture taken by a friend, on the slopes, among the skiers.

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Skiing in Lebanon 05
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
11 Jan 2015

During weekends, the station can host more than 8000 visitors, making it the most popular ski resort in the country.

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Skiing in Lebanon 12
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
12 Jan 2015

During weekends, the station can host more than 8000 visitors, making it the most popular ski resort in the country.

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Skiing in Lebanon 10
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
12 Jan 2015

A woman wearing the hijab in the chair lift.

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Skiing in Lebanon 14
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
11 Jan 2015

Two visitors simple enjoy the view from the chair lift.

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Skiing in Lebanon 06
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
12 Jan 2015

A view of Mzaar Kfardebian ski resort and its village. The popular ski resort is located at 1800m of altitude, at the heart of Mount Lebanon, just 44 kilometers north of Beirut. "What is special about Lebanon is that in April, you can ski in the morning and go to the sea in the afternoon", says Christian Rizk, Executive Director of the station.

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Skiing in Lebanon 07
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
11 Jan 2015

Skiers at Mzaar Kfardebian. The resort is one of the biggest in the Middle East.

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Skiing in Lebanon 02
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
11 Jan 2015

Each year, up to 100 000 visitors come to Mzaar Kfardebian ski resort.

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Skiing in Lebanon 03
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
12 Jan 2015

Snowboarders are about to go down the slopes.

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Skiing in Lebanon 01
Kfardebian
By Andreanewilliams
12 Jan 2015

Skiers are about to go down the slopes in Mzaar Ski Resort

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Lebanese Christians Take up Arms Agai...
Bekaa
By Andreanewilliams
13 Nov 2014

Ras Baalbek, Lebanon
November 13, 2014

Christians living in the villages of Qaa and Ras Baalbek, near the Syrian border in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley, have begun arming themselves against extremist groups from Syria. Volunteers are organizing village militias to protect their communities from Nusra Front and Islamic State militants whose plan is to extend their caliphate to the Mediterranean coast. Abu George and Michel, two militiamen from Qaa say that they received threats from Nusra Front after the Islamist group attacked and destroyed the Christian town of Maaloula, in Syria, in September 2013. Threats have multiplied after clashes erupted in the town of Arsal in August between the Lebanese Army and Islamist fighters who crossed the border from Syria. More than 20 Lebanese soldiers and policemen were captured in this incident, some of whom were executed.

  1. Various of hills
  2. Wide of church
  3. Wide of street
  4. Various of church
  5. Wide of Lebanese Army vehicle driving on dirt road
  6. Medium of Michel (Christian militiaman) driving
  7. Close-up of hands on steering wheel
  8. Travelling of hills
  9. Pan left of wooden crosses and Michel (Christian militiaman)

  10. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Michel, militiaman from Ras Baalbek town
    The municipality of Ras Baalbek has four men working as guards in the local police station. We stand guard at night and day, and when we encounter anything, we directly report it to the army, which takes action. There are six platoons from the [Lebanese Army] Airborne Regiment; there are soldiers from the Border Guard Regiment; and soldiers from the 8th Infantry Brigade are positioned on the border up there.

  11. Medium of cross

  12. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Michel, militiaman from Ras Baalbek town
    Soldiers from the 8th Infantry Brigade position sometimes go on patrols. These mountains are empty; there is nothing there. There is fear that an infiltration might occur. It is very cloudy and we cannot see anything, and someone might cross over from there.
    We only fear that someone might sneak during the night, or even during the winter when fog covers the town. This why we stay awake all night long guarding the town. Of course we collaborate with the Lebanese Army

  13. Wide of church

  14. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Michel, militiaman from Ras Baalbek town
    Soon, when winter comes, the weather becomes very snowy and cold. Some of them [fighters] will have to escape the cold and eventually come to our village; this is why we have to have stand guard during the night with help of the Lebanese Army.

  15. Medium of church bell

  16. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Michel, militiaman from Ras Baalbek town
    If any [fighter] comes from the hilltops, the Lebanese Army will warn us. It will not be easy [for fighters to infiltrate] since they need at least two hours to get to the town. We would then have to move our children, women and elderly, and to defend our homes, honor and homes.

  17. Wide of church

  18. Wide of hills

  19. Wide of grocery store

  20. Traveling of old man walking

  21. Wide of grocery store

  22. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Elias Mansour
    As Christians, we are not afraid. We will never leave our land and homes, we are very proud as Christians. Jesus Christ is always with us.

  23. Medium of church mural

  24. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Elias Mansour
    Every night, we have around 400 young men who assist the army and are always ready.

  25. Medium of Abu George driving

  26. Close up of rifle inside the car

  27. Medium of Abu George carrying rifle next to 4x4 vehicle

  28. Traveling of militiaman walking and holding rifle and binoculars

  29. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu George, 40 years old, and militiaman from Qaa, retired Lebanese soldier
    There have been several infiltration attempts, which have been dealt with.
    Not long ago -- about 15 days ago -- an infiltration attempt took place and it was dealt with. These attempts are taking place in small numbers. They [fighters] have probably come to see whether there is someone who is vigilant or not, and they saw what they should see.

  30. Tilt down of rifle held by Abu George

  31. Wide of militiaman aiming sniper rifle

  32. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu George, 40 years old, and militiaman from Qaa, retired Lebanese soldier
    Of course, they will not spare us. These people, despite the fact that they speak in the name of religion, are faithless and do not have no mercy on anyone; they do not have mercy on whoever they reach. We saw what happened to others and we do not want have to live the same experience. After what happened in Maaloula [a Syrian Christian town taken by Nusra Front], they threatened to do the same to us. They said they will do the same in one of the Christian towns of Northern Beqaa – our village is located in this area. This is a direct threat to neighboring villages and to us.

  33. Wide of militiaman aiming sniper rifle

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The First Arab Female MMA Fighter
Beirut
By Andreanewilliams
15 Aug 2014

August, 2014
Beirut, Lebanon

This past July, Rachel Abou Abdallah, from Lebanon, became the first female Arab MMA fighter to compete in the IMMF World MMA Championships in Las Vegas. She brought home the silver medal and her success has encouraged her to continue trailblazing. Mixed Martial Arts is a controversial sport for its violence, but it is also a male dominated sport and Rachel is participating in a male dominated sport in a largely patriarchal society. Despite the challenges she faces, she still finds time to continues to study architecture.

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Lebanese Landmine Survivors Football ...
Sidon
By Andreanewilliams
15 Sep 2014

A football team for victims of landmines, called The Lebanese Landmine Survivors Team, was launched in 2001 by the The Lebanese Welfare Association for the Handicapped (LWAH), to bring survivors together once a week to play football and help cope with their injuries.

Today the group is still developing and the players play with their prosthetic limbs on. They even play against teams from other associations who do not suffer handicaps. The team is comprised of 15 players and aims to gather as many young people as possible who suffer war injuries and help them develop psychologically and socially. The team is the only one of its kind in Lebanon and the Arab World. Even on a world level, there aren’t any teams that play while wearing prosthetic limbs.

Today Lebanon is relatively peaceful, but a 15-year civil war and conflicts with neighboring countries, such as Israel and Syria, have left unexploded land mines and cluster munitions across swathes of the tiny country. Between 1975-2012 these unexploded devices killed 903 people and injured a further 2,780. The Mines Advisory Group (MAG), a British NGO that works to clear unexploded ordinances in Lebanon, says that the number of accidents has recently increased.
The Lebanese Mine Action Centre (LMAC) aims to clear all cluster munitions by 2016 and almost all land mines by 2020. However, it is likely that these deadlines will not be met. When the land mines were laid, mostly during Lebanon’s civil war, no record of the locations was kept. It is impossible to know how many of the 4m cluster bombs that Israel fired on Lebanon during the 2006 war, failed to explode and still remain a danger.

Translation

(Man, Arabic): Dr. Bachir Abdul Hak, coach of the Lebanese survivor team:

(02:10) We had the idea of establishing this team in the Lebanese welfare association for the handicapped in the 1998, but we did not execute it until the year of 2000. We believe that all young men who suffer from a certain handicap need the physical and the athletic exercise to help them build their bodies, improve their physical and psychological health, and get out of their isolation. that is how the idea started, to provide a service that would help them socially and psychologically. (02:52)

(03:32) The team became like a family to me, we have been together for 14 years,all the children you see in the filed were born with us. i care a lot about this team and I give it all my time, and effort because it deserves the attention from us to be able to succeed. (05:52)

(Man, English) Ali Srour, player, 31 year old civil servant, from Aita al-Chaab, South of Lebanon. he lost his leg in a hunting trip near his village in 2001:

(04:04) (04:34)

(04:55) (05:25)

(05:34) (05:56)

(06:00) (06:26)

(06:31) (06:53)

(Woman, English) Habiba Aoun, Coordinator of Land-mine research center (Balamand University)

(07:21) (09:15)

(09:24) (09:43)

(09:53) (10:49)

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At least One killed as Clashes Erupt ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Andreanewilliams
02 Aug 2012

STORYLINE:
At least one was killed and several people were injured on Thursday, August 2, at Nile City Towers in Cairo after clashes erupted between security men and alleged thugs.
The so-called thugs attacked the Fairmont Hotel at the Nile City Towers with Molotov cocktails. One of them was shot dead by a police officer according to Egyptian state-run newspapers.
Some other reports say the number of people killed in the clashes was two.
Several burnt, damaged and overturned vehicles could be seen outside the hotel.
Eyewitnesses said the clashes erupted when a man entered Fairmont Hotel and demanded money, threatening people with a knife until the police officer confronted him and shot him dead.
Egypt’s Ministry of Interior stated that the man who was killed has a criminal record and was detained for security reasons.
He and his fellows were thugs who received monthly money from the hotel for protection and when the hotel management refused the thugs started rioting, according to the Ministry’s report.
The police arrested 15 men charged of being involved in the clashes and the prosecution is currently interrogating eight of them.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: August 2, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: August 2, 2012
Length: 0:02:06
Video Size: 103 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

Zoom in, smoke coming out of Fairmont Hotel at Nile City Towers in Cairo
Zoom in, a damaged car in smoke and crowds of people around it
Medium shot, two damaged cars outside the hotel
Pan right, external shot of the hotel with aftermath of stones on the ground
Medium shot, a firefighter extinguishing two burning cars
Medium shot, an overturned damaged and burnt car surrounded by a crowd
Long external shot of Fairmont Hotel
Zoom out, a number of shirtless men, some holding sticks, outside the hotel – they are the ones accused of being thugs
Various shots of the damaged cars and the crowds of people and security men outside the hotel
Tilt up, the large tower of Fairmont Hotel