peloponnessian Jonathan Alpeyrie

Born in Paris in 1979, Jonathan Alpeyrie moved to the United States in 1993. He graduated from the Lycée Français de New York in 1998, and went on to study medieval history at the University of Chicago, from which he graduated in 2003. Alpeyrie started his career shooting for local Chicago newspapers during his undergraduate years. He shot his first photo essay in 2001 while traveling the South Caucasus. After graduating, he went to the Congo to work on various essays, which were noticed and picked up by Getty Images, and signed a contributor contract in early 2004. In 2009, Jonathan became a photographer for Polaris images Alpeyrie has worked as a freelancer for various publications and websites, such as the Sunday Times, Le Figaro magazine, ELLE, American Photo, Glamour, Aftenposten, Le Monde, BBC, and today he is a photographer for Polaris Images, with whom he signed in February 2010. Jonathan Alpeyrie's career spans over a decade, and has brought him to over 25 countries, covered 12 conflict zones assignments, in the Middle East and North Africa, the South Caucasus, and Central Asia. A future photography book about WWII. Veterans with Verve Editions are in the works. Alpeyrie has been published in magazines such as: Paris Match, Aftenposten, Times (Europe), Newsweek, Wine Spectator, Boston Globe, Glamour, BBC, VSD, Le Monde, Newsweek, Popular Photography, Vanity Fair, La Stampa, CNN, and Bild Zeit…

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Inside a Polyamorous Community in NYC
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Mar 2016

Michel Madie, a 57 year old native of Algeria who grew up in Corsica, and well known realtor in New York city, has lived in the City since the mid 80's. After being introduced to the Polyamory communities in New York, Michel has become one of the front-man of this expanding trend, by hosting open sexuality parties inside his property while participating at other parties. Polyamory which derives from the Greek word "poly" which means many, and the Latin word "amor", which means love, is a practice of, and desire for intimate relationship involving more than two people with the knowledge and consent of everyone involved. Trust and openess is crucial if one desires to integrate and remain within these Poly communities. The city of New York, has many of the Poly groups and sub groups which are formed according to personal preferences. 

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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The Last Jews of Cuba
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15,000 Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their business and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Havana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Israel.

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Estilismo: Cuba's Up and Coming Fashi...
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
12 Jan 2015

When one thinks about Cuba, and what it represents to foreigners who visit the country, people usually think: Communism, Castro, embargo, Guantanamo, and cigars. Over the past few years, and with Fidel slowly passing the reign of power to his younger brother Raoul, Cuba has gradually opened its doors to the rest of the world allowing its people to venture a bit into this globalized world. Cuban youth was quick to recognized the various opportunities offered to them in the form cultural and professional expression. The fashion industry, for instance, is not a trend which has prospered within Cuba during its Communist years, but with the slow democratization of its institutions and habits, Cuba is seeing a burgeoning fashion industry spearheaded by a handful of smart, and talented young men and women whiling to take artistic risks and turn their art into something purely born out of Cuba’s rich history. These young artists creation take from Cuban’s old history while adding a touch of modernity best represented by Cuba’s upcoming future as well as its place in this world.

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Tamy Rodriguez, a Cuban Prima Ballerina
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
06 Sep 2015

Tamy Rodriguez is one of the most important and prolific dancers in Cuba. The 28 year old has made dancing her priority in life since she was a little girl. Already, as a child, she always danced at any music tuning. Her parents, quick to recognize their daughter’s love for dance and her ability to move with grace, signed her up to her first classes. Talented and focused the young girl was later was picked up by the famous Lizt Alfonso Dance School based in Cuba’s old Habana. Lizt is probably the most famous Cuban choreographer of her time and took Tamy in and trained her to become the number one dancer in her famous school. The particularity of Lizt’s Dance School is the fusion of all dance types found in Cuba mixed with African roots as well as the rigorous ballet tradition from Western Europe. This fusion gave birth to a very unique and powerful new type of moves, which is now internationally recognized, allowing its top dancers to travel the world each year to perform in major venues a few weeks at a time. Tamy, through her talent and leadership, leads the others from her group to become both uniquely cohesive and united. During my time with her, I was able to photograph her training at the school surrounded by the other members of her group. Each day practicing the numerous dance types, going from one room to another, each with its own challenges and technical difficulties.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community Near the ...
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Apr 2015

Only a few thousand Jews have remained in the port city of Mariupol. A mere 12 kilometers east of the city, fighting rages between pro-Russian separatists and volunteer battalions struggling to keep the town of Shirokino. The Chabad Lubavitch organization tries to keep track of its members still within the city while providing aim to the numerous Jewish families in need. Volunteers gather each day at the local Chabad center in central Mariupol helping to pack foodstuffs in plastic bags for local Jewish families who have decided to remain in the port city.

Natasha Ralko's windows were blown out while she was sitting in the living room of her apartment with her daughter and 8-month-old infant. Her kitchen is now heavily damaged. Ralko believes the death toll in eastern Ukraine is much higher than reported. Mariupol’s Jewish community is spread out, and some members, like Natalia Lavushko and her husband, Grigory, live on the city’s outskirts—areas that would be early targets in the event of a new offensive. The Lavushkos have stopped renovating their modest house because Ukraine’s currency devaluation has eaten into their meager income.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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WWII: Women of the Red Army 70 Years ...
Moscow
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 May 2015

This collection features portraits of women veterans of WWII who volunteered and were conscripted to serve in the Soviet Red Army. As Moscow filled up on May 9, 2015 to celebrate 70 years since Victory in what the Soviets called, and some Russians today call the Great Patriotic War, TTM contributor Jonathan Alpeyrie was able to meet and interview nine of these women, most of them grandmothers today, donning their military decorations for the festivities.

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Born in 1925, 90 year-old Nina has two children, five grand children, and 5 great grand children. Drafted into the Red Army in 1943 on the 4th Ukrainian front. At 16 years-old Nina was incorporated into a battalion following the army’s move Westward towards Prague, where she took part in the battle to retake the capital of Czechoslovakia in early 1945. During her time on the front she was in charge of various traffic regulation duties. 

“I took care of traffic regulations on the road leading to the front lines where vehicles and troops were passing," she recalls. She remembers also being afraid of the intense fighting going on around her at the time, especially in Western Ukraine where the fighting was very hard. "We fought for the unity of the Ukraine, and what is happening now is incomprehensible," she says sharply when asked about the current situation in Ukraine. "It is bad for everyone."

Born in 1924, 90 year-old Alexandra has two children and five grand children. Drafted into the Red Army in the town of Kalatch in the Voronezh region of central Russia, she was transferred to the front lines in December 1941, only 17 years old. 

“I was a nurse in a train hospital which moved along the front lines," she recalls. The hospital train would pick up the wounded and carry them back away from the fighting to field hospitals. “Some days, there were so many wounded soldiers that we were forced to travel on top of the train cars!” Alexandra remembers. In 1943, she fell ill and was sent to Tbilisi Georgia to recuperate. It is there that she met her future husband. “My most vivid memory was the day of our victory on May 9th 1945. We danced so much that day..."

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

 

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Ukraine: Volunteer Battalions Active ...
Shirokino, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Apr 2015

With the Minsk II cease fire accords, Russian backed separatists and the Ukrainian army were ordered to withdraw all heavy weapons from the front lines in order to give the peace plan a chance to work. On most of the 450KM front line the agreement worked except in a few flash points such as Lugansk, Peske near the Donetsk airport, and Shirokino near the port of Mariupol. In the past two weeks, the fighting between the two forces has increased dramatically, therefore putting the cease fire agreement in doubt, as many fear the fighting will erupt all along the line as it did last February. Near Mariupol, volunteer battalions like the Azov and Donbass units are fighting each day in the small town of Shirokino to keep control of the strategic town from separatists forces. Heavy fighting erupts on a daily basis. 

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Ukraine: Volunteer Battalions Active ...
Shirokino, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Apr 2015

April 29, 2015, Mariupol, Donbass Oblast, Ukraine.

With the Minsk II cease fire accords, Russian backed separatists and the Ukrainian army were ordered to withdraw all heavy weapons from the front lines in order to give the peace plan a chance to work. On most of the 450KM front line the agreement worked except in a few flash points such as Lugansk, Peske near the Donetsk airport and Shirokino near the port of Mariupol. In the past two weeks, the fighting between the two forces has increased dramatically, therefore putting the cease fire agreement in doubt, as many fear the fighting will erupt all along the line as it did last February. Near Mariupol, volunteer battalions like the Azov and Donbass units are fighting each day in the small town of Shirokino to keep control of the strategic town from separatists forces. Heavy fighting erupts on a daily basis. 

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Portrait of a Generation: WWII Vetera...
New York City, NY
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
07 Apr 2015

The Second World War was fought by an entire generation of men from more than 60 nations. Americans, Canadians, Russian, British, Chinese, South Africans and many others fought the Japanese, Spaniards, Italians, Germans, Slovaks and more, all were embroiled in a war which killed over 50 millions soldiers and civilians alike, making this conflict the bloodiest in Human history. The 1921/22-generation is today often known as a sacrificed generation, which fought for a various array of beliefs all intertwined in self-sacrifice and honor. In Germany alone 5.2 million soldiers were killed or missing in battle in a six-year period, Japan lost over 2 million men in combat, while the United States suffered 409 thousand men killed in action. However Russia holds the morbid record, with more than 10 million killed between 1941 and 1945. These astounding numbers show the brutality in which this war was fought in the air, on land and in the seas.

As a journalist, always in search for a certain historical truth within today’s framework, the stories of each of these men interviewed and photographed is a treasure of human perseverance. The project contains no pretense to judge or criticize the actions or decisions taken by these men, but it is rather a recollection of a period drastically different from ours. Their testimony is relevant in a historical sense, which should not be lost in time, as the next generations to come can and should learn from this generation.

The project itself differs from other veteran type shoots, in the sense that it tries to combine so many different nationalities. This combination was hard to achieve. It took no less than 5 years and travels to over 12 countries to meet, photograph, and interview these men. As a photojournalist, it was not only the photo shoot that was interesting, but also the search to meet these veterans, especially the ex Waffen SS and the foreign elements who fought within its ranks; and the more obscure nationalities who fought alongside major powers, like Croatians or Senegalese.

The photography project deals with as many nationalities as possible, for the simple reason that many nations were involved in the fighting. So far I have photographed Germans, Russians, Armenians, Karabastis, French, Belgium, Poles, Americans, Nepalese, Croatian, Czechs, Latvians, Japanese Americans, Pilipino, Hungarians and more…, which includes 221 men from 59 different nationalities.  Each man is interviewed on his experience through out the war. The goal of this project is to reunite as many veterans as possible from most of the nations involved in the Second World War.

FULL ARTICLE AND INTERVIEWS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Women Join the Fight in Ukraine
Schachtya, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
15 Feb 2015

On the front lines in Eastern Ukraine, the town of Schachtya, situated 16 KM North of the rebel held side of Luhangsk, is home to numerous Ukrainian army units fighting to keep control of this strategic town. One of these units, the volunteer assault battalion Aydar has many women amongst its ranks. While some hold more conservative positions, such as medics, doctors, and burial specialists; a few women have made the choice to become snipers, or to fight on the front lines along side their male counterparts. Here are their stories:

Lesia and Dasha, two nurses who live and work in the only field hospital still functioning in the front line town of Shchastya. The town has seen regular shelling by Grad rockets and artillery fire from separatist forces camped only two kilometers away. Though a Red Cross flag floats on the building’s rooftop, many separatist shells have found their target, destroying the entire room inside the large brick building and destroying ambulances, walls, ceilings, and even the office used by the staff.

 "A shell hit the building just two days before, smashing out all the windows. Thank God the floor where the nurse usually sleeps was empty that night," Dashia said. “Otherwise she would have been killed."

She describes how the shelling got so bad that the doctors decided to evacuate any wounded civilians or soldiers still getting treatment within the hospital’s walls. Though most of the hospital’s staff left to nearby cities further away from the front line, Lesya and Dashia and a few volunteers like her have remained behind to treat the injured still inside the city in need of being stabilized before being sent off to other hospitals in safer towns.

The incessant shelling has destroyed the city's electrical grid, forcing locals to seek heat by cutting down the city's trees for firewood. The lack of electricity is a recurrent problem for the nurses who are charged with making sure the hospital stays warm, for themselves, but also for the patients who need treatment in their facilities.

"The silence is the most frightening," Lesya says. "When we are bombed, we know what to expect, what to do. We hide in the room in the far corner of the building. It used to be the safest place until the windows in it were knocked out by artillery strikes. When it is quiet we are more afraid."

However, the shelling and harsh living conditions have not frightened them. The nurses decided to come and help the Ukrainian soldiers suffering at the front. Both come from the restive Luhansk region in the east of the Ukraine, where for four hundred years locals have been heavily influenced by their big neighbor: Russia. Nonetheless, Lesya and Dasha refuse the very idea of a divided Ukraine.

Both have children. They had an opportunity to leave but they chose to stay.

"The people from Aydar (a volunteer army battalion with strict nationalistic views) are my friends," Dasha explains. "My boyfriend serves in this battalion. I am also completing documents to join the unit."

 

This is not the first war for Mama Tanya. After college she was a medic in Baku, Azerbaijan, during the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict in the 1990’s. Her experience and her incessant will to save young men’s lives has brought her into yet another war in Eastern Ukraine where more soldiers need her help. Her task is to give first aid and pull wounded soldiers out of battle fields during special operations, heading to the front lines, picking up injured men and bringing them back to a nearby hospital for treatment.

"I fight for freedom and the territorial integrity of my country," she said, lighting up a cigarette. "This is our land. We are not aggressors like Russia. We are protecting our territory."

In this war alone she was injured on the battlefield, taken prisoner, and beaten up by Chechen soldiers. Yet she continues to stay on the frontlines.

"It is so scary here during artillery fire," she says. "I am the first one to run to the basement to hide, and I urge all the others to follow. It is stupid to die from a shell. To die on the battle field when one can see the enemy is another thing." She shows a certain tenderness for the young men fighting as she speaks.

The most difficult part of this war for her is not staying in wet dark trenches for days, without being able to look out or pee normally. She is sick and tired of losing people.

"I love everyone of the guys," she said. "I am ready to give up my soul for any of them. But most of all I love the kids, the young ones. I always wonder. Why, for God's sake, are they coming here?"

Mama Tanya, like many volunteers serving in the Aydar battalion, does not believe in the new cease-fire.

"The new humanitarian convoy from Russia has arrived," she explains. "We are waiting for 'presents' from the Luhansk People's Republic. They will wish us a happy morning, afternoon and evening. We known their schedule for artillery strikes precisely."

Though she dreams of peace, it will be difficult to leave life on the front lines.

"We are like a big family," she says. "The war will end sooner or later. When we think what we'd do after it ends, I jokingly suggest going to fight in Iraq or to liberate Georgia."

 

Vitaminka's biggest concern is that her boyfriend does not speak to her.

"That bastard went to the front without me," she recalls. "He went to work and told me to wait for him in Kiev, and I did for some time. Then he disappeared somewhere for two months. I later found out that he volunteered to go the front." Eventually, the 24 year-old girl also went east.

When the fighting with pro-Russian rebels grew more violent during mid-summer 2014 her boyfriend asked Vitaminka to return to a peaceful life and adopt a more traditional role, but Ukrainian women are not to be intimated easily. She joined the Aydar assault battalion as a fighter. As much as staying amongst civilians seemed intolerable for Vitaminka, her sense of patriotism towards her country has never been stronger.

"The most difficult thing is that when my dear brothers are dying here, the rest of people don't give a damn about it," she says recalling life in her native town of Zaporozhe. "They just drive fancy cars, buy expensive clothes, or sneakers for $200-300 per pair. That is why few fighters return from a vacation without getting in a scuffle with someone."

Vitaminka says the battlefield does not scare her. Everything is clear. She says her instincts take control of the body, as her will to kill remains sharp at all times. However, what really scares her is the anticipation in the run-up to an assault on enemy positions: "The most difficult is to wait for the unknown," she said.

Despite her unorthodox profession, Vitaminka has very conservative plans for the future, and plans to get married and have kids. She also wants to work as a recreation therapist.

"How could I help people get over the psychological effects of war if I have never experienced it myself?" she says. "What I like about being here is that life seems more vivid. There is a lot of grief.  It comes very often. Because of that, one feels joy much more keenly. I cannot change my attitude towards events. It is easier to change the events instead."

 

'Anaconda,' is young and willing to fight to keep Ukraine a unified nation. She got her name from a unit commander who jokingly referred to the young woman as powerful, yet a little slow due to her large size. The baby-faced 19-year-old says that her mother is very worried about her and calls her many times a day, sometimes even during combat. She says it is better to always pick up the phone, as her mother will not stop calling up she picks up.

"In the very beginning my mom kept saying that the war is not for girls," Anaconda recalls. "But now she has to put up with my choice. My dad would have come to the front himself, but his health does not allow him to move. He is proud of me now."

She used to serve near Debaltseve, but decided to move to the Aydar volunteer battalion to join some of her friends who were already in the unit. As a medic, she never liked violence, however being a passive observer was not for her either.

"I used to work in Kiev's military hospital as a nurse," Anaconda explains. "I understood that I could not keep watching our men dying and sit on the fence anymore. That was it. This is my country and my people. It hurts to see how fighters and civilians die on both sides of the conflict. I want this war to end faster," she said.

There are only two girls in the corps, but the men treat her well. "People are good," she said. "The only problem is to find a room to change."

 

Some 30 graves with grave markers reading “Temporarily Unidentified Hero of Ukraine” were hastily dug in a small cemetery on the outskirts of Starobilsk, in eastern Ukraine. Walking along the graves, Viktoria had something to say about each of the unknown soldiers. Though she had never met any of them while they were alive, she had kind words for each of these young men who fell defending the unity of Ukraine. After the 22-year-old was wounded in combat while fighting pro-Russia separatists, she was sent to Starobilsk to rest. Her will to help in the war effort did not diminish, and she felt she could do more while recuperating from her injuries.

Viktoria now takes care of the dead fighters. She delivers the bodies to the local morgue for DNA analysis, as many of the corpses who come in are in such poor shape that they are unrecognizable. She fills in the necessary paper work sends the DNA sample back to Kiev for testing, and hopefully finds a match with a family. Once this is done, she orders the coffins. She also has to deal with relatives of the dead.

"I talked with a wife of one soldiers buried in this cemetery," Viktoria said. "I told her that other fighters saw her husband crawling after them without two legs. It is unlikely that he survived. After the DNA analysis confirmed his identity, I called her again to find out the approximate date of the exhumation. But she did not believe me. She said that her husband was alive, and she would not rebury him."

Viktoria says that men are not able do her job. They go mad after a week of it, she explains. However, she too needs breaks from this rather morbid activity. Her solution is simple. Make regular trips to the front lines to feel the winds of battle upon her face, to remind herself that she is alive, and not dead like the many soldiers she helped bury.

"If I do not go to the front at least once a week I simply go nuts," she says. "I used to be in a combat unit, always on the front line. I need to sit in a trench for a minute at least or deliver food there and see the boys. My commanders do not allow me to go to the front very often. They are scared that I will stay there."

Viktoria refers to all of the dead fighters from the Aydar volunteer battalion only as 'her boys'. She feels obliged to pay them her last respects.

"We have buried so many decent people," Viktoria says. "Some of the boys had several university degrees, were very smart. Some were 18-19 years old. This land is not worth the lives of our soldiers. There are some deserving people here. But they are few," she continues, adding that most people in the region prefer to flee and become refugees, who talk of the 'crazy people fighting in the east'.

She used to believe that she was protecting her country, but now she is not so sure anymore. Yet, she cannot leave.

"Where I can go to get away from them?" she smiles. "They are helpless. Once I took a vacation. For the first time in a year, I put on a fancy dress and went to a nightclub. At five in the morning, I got a call in the nightclub. They said that there was a dead fighter. I had to give them instructions all the day via phone."

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iDollators: The Lives and Loves of Me...
Detroit, Toledo, Chicago
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Dec 2014

FULL TEXT OR INTERVIEW AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

IDollators, a colloquial way of referring to people who find companionship with dolls, have communities throughout the United States and create links with other groups around the world, in Russia, Japan, Canada and Europe. This has become a world phenomenon. They share ideas, visions, fears, and above all their love for these Silicon dolls made by specialized companies for the hefty price of around six thousand dollars each.

Terry, a retired Navy man, once married with children, now lives with his silicone Doll called Feodora. She was built in Vladivostok Russia by a Russian company who specializes in the making of Anatomical Dolls like Terry's.

Davecat (he prefers to be identified by his online handle in a popular Doll Forum) has two silicone dolls, one he considers as his wife, Sidore Kuroneko, made in Japan, and the other his mistress, Elena Vostrikova, made in Russia. Both share his life inside his small Detroit apartment.

Some iDollators save their money for years in order to acquire a life size companion. Once acquired, owners have different uses for their newfound love. While most do have sex with the doll on a regular basis, some do not, and only seek companionship and care through this lifeless body.

Terry is not the typical doll owner: he does not have sex with it. Rather, Feodora keeps him company while perfecting his long time hobby: photography. Davecat, however, has regular sex with his mistress and wife dolls.

Often referred to by their first names, the dolls can be seen publicly as their owners take them along for day to day leisure activities.

After a difficult relationship with a woman, John opted for a drastic change in his romantic life and bought Jackie, a life-like doll made in California. He takes her everywhere, but preferably to the Zoo and to his favorite restaurant, where the owner and his workers are happy to accommodate him and Jackie to their favorite meal.

Is this new phenomenon a sign of the things to come in a ‘modern’ global civilization where individualism reigns supreme over traditional family values? These individuals who prefer to give love to a silicone body over a real human are perhaps direct proof that humans were never meant to live their lives alone, but to share what life has to offer with others.

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Witches Compass
New York City
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
10 Oct 2014

Brooklyn, 10/14
The season of the witch is back. From American Horror Story: Coven to a new exhibit at the British Museum called “Witches and Wicked Bodies,” witches are once again ascendant. The current neo-pagan revival is less evocative of the cutest witches we met in 1990’s – it is distinctly feminist. The new witch culture blends a kind of radical eroticism with metaphysical liberation — and it aims to change the world.
On the weekend of October 10th, we attended and shot the first anniversary of the Witches Compass, a monthly gathering of appropriately attired occultists at Kateland, a bookstore in Bushwick, Brooklyn that is at the epicenter of the local pagan universe. Katelan Foisy (also a painter, model, and tarot card reader) lead attendees through an immersive ritual cleansing to honor the Hunter’s Moon — with massive paper moons on display. Katelan and her witch-colleague Damon Stang are pioneers of the occult revival happening in this hipster enclave. A few days after the Witches Compass, I sat down for an interview with Katelan and Fred Jennings, the co-owner of Kateland. They explained what makes the third contemporary resurgence of the occult so different than the ones that have come before. Intrinsically feminist, LGBT-friendly, and politically active by nature, the new witches are in it for far more than just love spells.

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Ukrainian Army's Wounded Soldiers
kiev
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
01 Aug 2014

The official Ukrainian Army death toll of 800, during the so called ‘anti terrorist operation’ to retake territory conquered by the pro-Russian separatists last April, is a gross underestimation of casualties suffered by the army. Numbers vary tremendously between Ukrainian and pro-Russian sources. Statistics, like in any conflict are difficult to decipher. Officially, the authorities in Kiev say that the losses they have suffered are 935 killed, 3215 wounded, 13 missing, 1373 prisoners and 20,000 deserters. The numbers given by the separatists are very different: 27,888 killed and wounded, 1649 captured and 13500 deserted or missing. Though it will take time to know exactly how many government soldiers have been killed or wounded, what is certain is that the main military hospitals in Kiev, Kharkov and other main cities, are full of critically injured men.

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Ukrainian Separatists Burry Their Deads
donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
22 Aug 2014

Working inside Donetsk presents various challenges for photojournalists. One major challenge involves working directly with rebel forces defending one of their last bastions against government forces. Each day their defensive perimeter is shrinking due to constant shelling. Journalists can only work if granted proper accreditation approved by the Donetsk People Republic. In theory, the accreditation allows journalists to work in military areas, though most suspect it is also used to control the information gathered and shared with the world. The following funeral series is both rare and hard to come by, as the rebels never give access to events that show their demise or military loses. In this case, however, we happened to come across a convoy of rebel cars and two armored vehicles, carrying troops and two coffins each. We decided to follow it and try our luck. After a mile, troops from the convoy stopped us, pointed their machine gun at us and demanded to know why we were following them. When we expressed interest in documenting the funeral, they uncharacteristically agreed. After driving another 20 minutes, the convoy reached a small village right on the front lines, as could be deduced by the constant shelling heard whenever government forces are nearby. For one hour, we photographed the entire ceremony, only to be arrested as soon as it ended under the pretext that their faces could be seen in the pictures. Some soldiers forced us in different cars and drove us to their headquarters back in Donetsk, where they forced us to delete all the photos. Though we obeyed, we were able to retrieve all of them once back at the hotel.

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The Siege of Donetsk
donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
20 Aug 2014

Since the retreat of the pro-Russian separatist forces from Slaviansk and Kramatorsk last May, the rebels have been losing ground against the Ukrainian army. Pushing deeper into rebel-held territory, the army loyal to Kiev has laid siege to the two last remaining major cities still under separatist control: Lugansk and Donetsk. Recently, the city of Lugansk has been completely surrounded and under intense bombardment, forcing the rebels to renew their demand for help to Russia. Donetsk is the largest city in the Donbass region. Before the war, the city had an estimated 1.2 million souls, but less then half are still present within the city limits. Under daily shelling from Ukrainian forces, the remaining population has been finding shelter in cellars and atomic-proof bunkers, some dating back to WWII. In recent days, the government attacks have been more consistent and deadly, targeting downtown and suburb areas alike to demoralise separatist troops defending their stronghold. Most of the locals who have refused to leave are either old, poor, or hopeful that the war will end soon. However, this is an unlikely case, as the Ukrainian army has adopted a strategy of attrition against the determined rebel forces. It is likely that Donetsk will suffer the same fate as Lugansk, with mounting civilian casualties caught in the middle of a war sponsored by the West and Russia alike.

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Women in Construction
new york
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Mar 2014

If women are today represented in all professional sectors, they remain marginal in construction, a traditionally male realm. In the United States, they now account for around 13% of the workforce in New York, but only 3% nationally. Yet, the progress made is huge. In forty years, they have gradually shaken up the conventional ideas and earned their place on the field, by dint of skill and perseverance. In Manhattan, a school run by a non-profit organization trains every year as many as 500 women to get them into higher-paying jobs in construction trades. Often more involved than their male counterparts in the projects, these women impress with their professionalism. As Elise Harris, a journalist in the process of reconversion, Pia Hofmann, one of the few American women to operate a crane, or Barbara Armand, who runs a respected and successful construction management company. Here’s an overview of these New-Yorker women in construction and the challenges they face to achieve integration on a field which was until recently 100% male.

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New York's Catacombs
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Mar 2014

Catacombs in New York? Who would have thought such a thing... The New Yorkers themselves will look at you with skepticism if you dare to ask them. However, the vast cemetery of Green-Wood in Brooklyn houses such "catacombs". Certainly nothing here to compare with their Parisian cousins and their millions of bones, but a little-known curiosity that is well worth a visit. Built in the 19th century, they contain the vaults of thirty families. At a time when medicine was less effective, many feared to wake up in their graves. Some thought that being buried in such vaults, and not below ground, could save their life thanks to bells and other alerts they installed in the graves! Just in case... Join us for an unprecedented tour of these catacombs, tucked away in the heart of one of the oldest and most bucolic U.S. cemeteries where rest also icons like Jean-Michel Basquiat or Leonard Bernstein.

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Daayiee Abdullah: First openly gay imam
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
20 Mar 2014

On December 20th, when the subject was broadcasted on Al-Jazeera America, the subject generated record audiences. There were more than 12 million Americans watching the evening show about “America’s first openly gay imam". At 60, Daayiee Abdullah is an atypical man. Muslim, gay and happy. If his aura and infectious laugh have made him extremely popular in the U.S. gay community for a decade, in contrast, his liberal positions irritate radical Muslims. However, this gentle giant has given hope to many homosexuals who intended to leave Islam, by proposing to celebrate Muslim weddings between same-sex partners. On the sixty unions he blessed, a quarter have been between gays or lesbians.

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New Orleans Sex Industry
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
05 Mar 2014

Sex work is often just work. Some do it out of economic necessity -- for survival. For others, sex work offers a path to empowerment and independence. Yet because sexuality is typically hidden in the darkest corners of our culture, sex workers are marginalized, harassed, and put in danger -- not just by the people that use their services, but by the police whose "protect and serve" motto doesn't always extend to sex workers.

In this series of portraits and interviews, we go deep into the underbelly of sex work in New Orleans, Louisiana -- the Big Easy. Sexuality is on display in every doorway and street sign on Bourbon Street, but the day-to-day lives of strippers, escorts, and other sex workers is not what you'd expect. The woman sipping coffee and tapping at her laptop in the cafe? You'd never know she was a sex worker.

There is a persistent myth about sex trafficking during large events in the United States -- the same story about an increase in trafficking before the Super Bowl is trotted out every year, but the numbers don't add up. In this story, we explode myths around sex trafficking and take you inside an average day in the life of several New Orleans sex workers, during and after the street bacchanal that is Mardi Gras.

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The Battle for Yabroud
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
24 Apr 2013

The Qalamoun Mountains have been since the beginning for the Syrian civil war an important strategic region for both the Assad regime and the rebellion controlling the area. Close to the Lebanese border, and crucial for the rebellion’s supply chain, the region has been an efficiently controlled area, where thousands of FSA and Islamists units have been thriving until the regime decided to take it back by force using artillery, Jet fighter strikes, and Hezbollah ground units. Since spring last year, Yabrud and its surroundings villages and towns have been subjected to constant artillery and jet strikes meant to softened rebel positions through out. By mid summer 2013, Yabrud, Rankos, Assal, and other localities have been targeting daily, killing both civilians and rebels troops, while Hezbollah infantry units supported by the Syrian army launched numerous attacks to destabilize the rebels protecting the area: to no avail, however, as the FSA was quite strong and was able to repel most attacks. By the fall, the government stepped up its attacks, suggesting an incoming major ground assault on the region. As a result most villages and towns were recaptured by Assad’s troops and allies from rebel units, now in disarray, and fighting for their lives. Today, the situation is permanently in Assad’s favor, as only Yabrud seem to be in rebel hands, the last strong hold left to the rebellion. With dozens of strikes a day, the rebels, have little chance to stop the government’s advance trying to capture what is left of a failing rebellion in the Qalamoun mountains.

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Somali Women in Little Mogadishu, USA
Minneapolis, United States of America
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
07 Dec 2013

Somali women in Minneapolis, Somalia's largest diaspora in the Western world, hold the destiny of an entire community abroad, badly bruised by more than 20 years of civil war, in their hands. They realize that America offers them opportunities they would never dream of in their own country. And while they are taking advantage of what America has to offer, Somali women are also determined to preserve their African and Muslim identity while raising their children. Successful, hard-working, they are three times more likely than their male counterparts to study in Minnesota, the northern U.S. state that is home to the largest Somali diaspora in the western world. Yet this success is coupled with an unexpected challenge: how to find a Somali husband when you’re so qualified. The problem is so acute that some of these female refugees have no choice but to return to Africa to track down a man.

Media created

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Polyamory NYC 19
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
12 Dec 2015

Michel and Rasmus are now married and celebrating inside their home amongst their guests.

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Polyamory NYC 20
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
26 Jan 2016

Michel is getting ready for work in his New York home.

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Polyamory NYC 17
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
12 Dec 2015

Michel and Rasmus are getting married at their house.

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Polyamory NYC 18
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
12 Dec 2015

A female Rabbi is marying Rasmus and Michel inside their home.

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Polyamory NYC 15
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
31 Oct 2015

Michel and Rasmus are taking part in a Swinger party in Brooklyn.

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Polyamory NYC 16
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
31 Oct 2015

Michel and Rasmus are taking part in a Swinger party in Brooklyn.

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Polyamory NYC 13
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
27 Oct 2015

Michel and Rasmus are hosting an open sexuality party.

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Polyamory NYC 14
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
27 Oct 2015

Michel and Rasmus are hosting an open sexuality party.

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Polyamory NYC 05
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
27 Oct 2015

Michel is getting ready for an open sexuality party.

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Polyamory NYC 12
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
27 Oct 2015

Michel and Rasmus are hosting an open sexuality party.

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Polyamory NYC 10
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 Oct 2015

Michel and Rasmus are hosting a few lovers at their house after a party.

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Polyamory NYC 09
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 Oct 2015

Michel and Rasmus are having an intimate moment in their bedroom.

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Polyamory NYC 11
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 Oct 2015

Rasmus and Michel are pleasuring a woman inside their shower.

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Polyamory NYC 07
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Sep 2015

Rasmus is kissing the host of a kissing party in Brooklyn.

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Polyamory NYC 08
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
09 Oct 2015

Michel and Rasmus are hosting a few lovers at their house after a party.

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Polyamory NYC 04
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
20 Sep 2015

Michel is performing a dance for his guests inside his home.

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Polyamory NYC 03
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
20 Sep 2015

Michel and Rasmus are getting close with one of their lovers.

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Polyamory NYC 06
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
24 Sep 2015

Michel and his lover Rasmus are getting ready for a party.

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Polyamory NYC 01
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
19 Sep 2015

Michel is kissing the back of Rasmus's neck at a diner with two fellow Polyamorous ladies.

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Polyamory NYC 02
New York
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
19 Sep 2015

Rasmus and Michel are wooing a woman during an open sexuality diner at his house.

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Cuba's Last Jews 32
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
31 Aug 2015

September 1st, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 33
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
31 Aug 2015

September 1st, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 34
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
31 Aug 2015

September 1st, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 31
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
02 Sep 2015

September 3rd, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 29
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
02 Sep 2015

September 3rd, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 30
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
02 Sep 2015

September 3rd, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 27
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
01 Sep 2015

September 2nd, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 28
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
01 Sep 2015

September 2nd 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 26
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
01 Sep 2015

September 2nd, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 24
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
30 Aug 2015

August 31th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 22
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
30 Aug 2015

August 31th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 23
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
30 Aug 2015

August 31th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 20
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
30 Aug 2015

August 31th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 21
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
30 Aug 2015

August 31th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 18
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Aug 2015

August 29th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 19
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Aug 2015

August 29th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 15
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Aug 2015

August 29th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 16
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Aug 2015

August 29th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 17
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Aug 2015

August 29th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 14
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Aug 2015

August 29th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)