Mauro Prandelli Mauro Prandelli

Mauro Prandelli was born in 1979 in Brescia, Italy. In 2011 he started to work as free lance. He attended the course of Photojournalism held by Sandro Iovine in Milan and, in the meantime, he co-operated with different national and international magazines focusing on reportages on current and humanitarian issues.
In 2012 he produced the reportage called “Evros river, the oriental gate of Europe. A wall against immigration.”, work edited by Sandro Iovine, which illustrates the situation of the migrants who try to enter in Europe through the Turkish borders.
In 2013 he exhibited at the Ethic Photography Festival, Lodi, at the WSP Photography, Rome and at the CiternaPhotography Festival, Citerna, Italy.
He is currently working on the realization of a long-term project on the migration through the Balkan route. He also worked abroad, mainly in Greece, Bosnia, Serbia, Iraq, Lebanon, Turkey and Egypt.

Collections created

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Balkan Route – Another Way to Reach E...
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
21 Sep 2015

Between Serbia and Macedonia runs the imaginary line of the Balkan route, a corridor of about one thousand kilometers to reach the borders of Hungary. It represents an escape way for an always growing number of migrants who leave Greece due to the economic crisis and to the heavy pressures exerted by the police and by extremist right wing groups.

With the help of traffickers the migrants travel through the Balkans to search for a better future in Europe. The Balkan route, which is the third most important access in terms of number of entries into Europe, can be considered relatively safe. There are different witnesses on the way the migrants are treated: some of them find shelter in the reception camps made available by the Serbian government, others report that they are not accepted and are forced to sleep in the woods. 

Others say the inhabitants of the Balkan region accept them while some migrants accuse the police of stealing their money and of using force to refuse them entry. Despite this, all of them want to continue their journeys, hoping to find in Europe a safe shelter from wars and famines they have left behind in their countries.

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Balkan route – another way to reach E...
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
21 Sep 2015

Between Serbia and Macedonia runs the imaginary line of the Balkan route, a corridor of about one thousand kilometers to reach the borders of Hungary. It represents an escape way for an always growing number of migrants who leave Greece due to the economic crisis and to the heavy pressures exerted by the police and by extreme right wing groups. With the help of the traffickers the migrants climb up the Balkans to search a better future in Europe. The Balkan route, which is the third most important access in terms of number of entries into Europe, can be considered relatively safe. There are different witnesses on the way the migrants are treated : some of them find shelter in the reception camps made available by the Serbian government, others report that they are not accepted and are forced to sleep in the woods, others say the inhabitants of the Balkan region accept them while some migrants accuse the police of stealing their money and of using force to refuse them to entry.  Anyway, all of them want to continue their journeys, hoping to find in Europe a safe shelter from wars and famines they have in their countries.

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Balkan route – another way to reach E...
Bogovadja
By Mauro Prandelli
21 Sep 2015

Between Serbia and Macedonia runs the imaginary line of the Balkan route, a corridor of about one thousand kilometers to reach the borders of Hungary. It represents an escape way for an always growing number of migrants who leave Greece due to the economic crisis and to the heavy pressures exerted by the police and by extreme right wing groups. With the help of the traffickers the migrants climb up the Balkans to search a better future in Europe. The Balkan route, which is the third most important access in terms of number of entries into Europe, can be considered relatively safe. There are different witnesses on the way the migrants are treated : some of them find shelter in the reception camps made available by the Serbian government, others report that they are not accepted and are forced to sleep in the woods, others say the inhabitants of the Balkan region accept them while some migrants accuse the police of stealing their money and of using force to refuse them to entry.  Anyway, all of them want to continue their journeys, hoping to find in Europe a safe shelter from wars and famines they have in their countries.

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The Syrian Refugee Odyssey - Istanbul
Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
15 Apr 2014

What was once a welcoming and supportive reception for Syrian refugees in Turkey has turned to resentment and destitution. As the Syrian war has dragged on, Istanbul, Turkey's economic and touristic hun, has seen the population of destitute Syrians swell. As a result, the patience of the local population and aid from the government is wearing thin. While Istanbul has long been a hub for migrants traveling to and from Europe, Syrians have been trapped in Turkey, as it is almost impossible for them to obtain visas for onward travel to Europe, and many cannot return to Syria out of concern for their safety. Many now find themselves living in squalor with little hope or options for the future. 

One Syrian refugee described their situation in Turkey by saying:

"Life in Turkey is very hard, Syrians cannot work because they do not have the necessary permits and the only solution is to work illegally. There are children who work 15 hours per day to bring to their families a little money which is not even enough to buy bread. When the war is over I want to go back to Damascus, to my family, to my land."

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

Media created

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010 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
29 Mar 2014

Syrian refugees who escape to Istanbul are usually Sunni muslims. Turkey is a predominantly Sunni Muslim country. Politically, Turkey has been traditionally secular. However, the rise of Recip Teyyip Erdogan to power has changed this and Sunni Islam has begun taking a more central role in Turkish social life.

In the beginning, Erdogan helped Syrians in the name of religion and to help generate more votes amongst the Turkish electorate. However, some Syria refugees feel that, while Erdogan is a good muslim man, he does not actually do much to help them.

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007 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
31 Mar 2014

The Syrian community has founded many associations that help Syrian refugees in Istanbul. Near Aksaray, the Syrian Noor Association provides refugees with a doctor and a dentist. Some refugees suffer from post-traumatic Stress disorders, especially young people directly affected by the fighting. However, lack of access to psychological care is still a major problem.

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008 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
31 Mar 2014

The €œSyrian Noor Association€ collects medicine in order to distribute them in the center or to send them every month to Syria. The Turkish Government allows them to do so, but does no€™t help in any way.

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004 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
29 Mar 2014

12 year old Mohammad was found on the streets of Istanbul by the owner of a Syrian restaurant. He and his brother were welcomed by the man, a former computer engineer who escaped the war, and started working as dishwashers in his restaurant. The two boys work 14 hours per day and sleep in a room behind the refrigerator in the kitchen of the restaurant.

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005 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
03 Apr 2014

Those who cannot spend too much for the rent share small basements or cellars. Many Syrian refugees canno€™t work in Turkey because they do no€™t have a residency permit.

Anas, 24 years old, escaped from Aleppo and works as a tailor in Istanbul without any job security. He left his family in Syria and is thinking of going back there to fight against the regime of Bashar al Assad.

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006 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
03 Apr 2014

A Syrian refugee shows his ID card and describes his arrest and torture at the hands of the Syrian police. On the ID there is a number which indicates which district a person is from. Based on the district, police can often venture a good guess as to a person's religion.

The person in the photo was arrested while coming back from University. According to him, the Police stopped him, checked his ID, and arrested him because he is Sunni. While the uprising in Syria has involved people of all religions and ethnicities, it is largely comprised of Sunni Muslims, who are also Syria's majority population.

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002 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
29 Mar 2014

Refugees come from different social classes. Those who can afford it rent an apartment in Aksaray for 1000Tl ($380) per month and share it with other people. Usually the richer refugees think about escaping to Europe by paying a smuggler, while others decide to stop in Istanbul and invest their money in commercial activities.

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003 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
29 Mar 2014

After the trip to Istanbul, one of the main problems for Syrian refugees is the language. Some words from the Turkish and Arabic languages are similar, but, due to the nationalism, a dominant characteristic of many Turks, people who speak Arabic are often discriminated.

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001 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
31 Mar 2014

The wall near the Fatih Mosque bears a slogan reading:

"€œYesterday Bosnia, today Syria"€.

The Syrian community seeking shelter in Turkey numbers about 1.5 million people. Syrian refugees try to reestablish their lives in Istanbul, looking to the longterm.