sorinfurcoi sorinfurcoi

freelance photographer for the last 6 years
previously worked with print media in Qatar - Abode magazine, Oryx publishing
Commercial photography for automotive market - Mitsubishi, Volvo, Toyota, Cadillac

Collections created

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Doha Baker
Doha
By sorinfurcoi
23 Nov 2014

Qatar has developed at a fast pace over the last ten years and its economy is continuously growing. The increase in the expatriate labor force and the number of businesses operating in the country have pushed up the demand of premium real estate for housing and offices.

While many traditional corner shops and neighborhood stores have seen their doors shut to make place for modern buildings to house the future of Qatar’s small and medium businesses, others managed to still keep their place on the Doha’s backstreets and in the daily life of their loyal clients. 

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Sudan: The Ancient Nubian Pyramids at...
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
21 Apr 2015

More than 200km from the Sudanese capital Khartoum, the remains of an ancient city rise from the arid and inhospitable terrain like a science-fiction film set. Nestled between sand dunes, the secluded pyramids seem to have been forgotten by the modern world, with no nearby restaurants or hotels to cater to tourists. The Nubian Meroe pyramids, much smaller but just as impressive as the more famous Egyptian ones, are found on the east bank of the Nile river, near a group of villages called Bagrawiyah. The pyramids get their name from the ancient city of Meroe, the capital of the Kingdom of Kush, an ancient African kingdom situated in what is now the Republic of Sudan. Around 1000 BCE, after the fall of the 24th Egyptian dynasty, the Nubian Kingdom of Kush arose as the leading power in the middle Nile region. The Kushite kings took over and ruled much of Egypt from 712 to 657 BCE. In 300 BCE, when the capital and royal burial ground of the kingdom moved to the Meroe region, the pharaonic tradition of building pyramids to encapsulate the tombs of rulers continued here.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Central African Republic Refugees Fle...
democratic republic of congo
By sorinfurcoi
06 Mar 2014

The Central African Republic (CAR) has experienced decades of political unrest. Violence has spiralled since the 2013, when the mostly Muslim Seleka rebels alliance
ousted President Francois Bozize. Their abuses against the majority Christian population sparked a wave of revenge attacks that led to massacres across the country.

Violence in the north east of the country and in the capital Bangui has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes. UNHCR estimates that over 2000 people have been killed since December 2013. More than 600 000 people have been internally displaced and some 100 000 have fled to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the Republic of the Congo, Chad and Cameroon.

According to the UNHCR, the Democratic Republic of the Congo is now hosting nearly 60,000 refugees from Central African Republic. Half of them are spread across four refugee camps, while the others are living with host families.
An estimated 9000 people live in the Mole refugee camp, located on the banks of the Oubagui river, 35 kilometres from the nearest big town, Zongo, in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Nearly 10,000 refugees, both Muslims and Christians, have found refuge in the Boyabu Camp.

Media created

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Meroe Pyramids 18
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

The pyramids are located northeast of Sudan near the river Nile.

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Meroe Pyramids 17
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

What the Italian explorer Giuseppe Ferlini discovered after smashing the top of 40 pyramids was taken back to British and German museums.

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Meroe Pyramids 16
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

'This is our history. Here our ancestors are buried,' said Abdullah who lives in Al Tarabil village, a few kilometres away from the site of the pyramids.

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Meroe Pyramids 15
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Between 1800 and 1870, Italian explorer Giuseppe Ferlini smashed the top of 40 pyramids to get to their treasure.

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Meroe Pyramids 13
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Renewed restoration and preservation efforts are under way. Still, visitors leave their mark, etching their names into bricks.

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Meroe Pyramids 14
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Renewed restoration and preservation efforts are under way. Still, visitors leave their mark, etching their names into bricks.

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Meroe Pyramids 12
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

The pyramids get their name from the ancient city of Meroe, the capital of the Kingdom of Kush, an ancient African kingdom situated in what is now the Republic of Sudan.

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Meroe Pyramids 10
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Excavation of the pyramids began only in the middle of the 19th century.

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Meroe Pyramids 11
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Through the years, the pyramids have been plundered of all their wealth.

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Meroe Pyramids 09
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Some pyramids have been partially restored, looking new in comparison with their neighbours.

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Meroe Pyramids 08
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Through the years the pyramids have been plundered of all their wealth.

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Meroe Pyramids 06
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

There are more than 230 pyramids in Sudan, stretching across the ancient Nubian kingdom.

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Meroe Pyramids 07
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

The pyramids are the burial site for more than 40 Nubian kings and queens

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Meroe Pyramids 05
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

These the Meroe pyramids are among the best preserved in Sudan.

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Meroe Pyramids 04
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

The royal pyramids at Meroe were built in Nubia 800 years after the Egyptians finished building theirs.

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Meroe Pyramids 03
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

The royal pyramids at Meroe were built in Nubia 800 years after the Egyptians finished building theirs.

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Meroe Pyramids 02
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Locals offer camel rides to tourists and visitors. Here they wait for clients under the hot sun.

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Meroe Pyramids 01
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

A local guide offers camel rides to tourists and visitors.

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Mole camp 9
By sorinfurcoi
05 Mar 2014

Woman doing daily chores in Mole refugee camp

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Boyabu Camp 19
By sorinfurcoi
05 Mar 2014

Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. UNHCR, with the help of local Congolese contractors, have dug up wells around the camp for drinking water. Refugees often complain that not all the wells have clean water suitable for cooking and drinking.

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Boyabu Camp 17
By sorinfurcoi
05 Mar 2014

Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. Two sisters caring for their younger brother.

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Boyabu Camp 10
By sorinfurcoi
05 Mar 2014

The main street in Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. Boyabu camp is hosting an estimated 6000 refugees.

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Mole Camp 6
By sorinfurcoi
08 Mar 2014

Mole refugee camp, Zongo, DRC. A child playing with a ball. UNHCR and the leaders elected by the refugees regularly organize sport events and other activities for the youth.

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Boyabu Camp 17
By sorinfurcoi
05 Mar 2014

Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. Family preparing their dinner. The only food they receive from the UNHCR is flour, salt and oil. The rest of their diet is composed of fruits and root vegetable they pick in the forest and the other food they manage to trade around the camp and in the local market.

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Mole Camp 3
By sorinfurcoi
08 Mar 2014

Mole refugee camp, Zongo, DRC. Children singing and playing after school. For a moment, it seems like they forget their situation.

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Boyabu Camp 12
By sorinfurcoi
05 Mar 2014

Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. Portrait of a child. UNHCR employs refugees living in the camp as teachers. The refugee teachers are in charge of the school and the education of the children under the supervision the UNHCR and the refugees' leaders.

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Mole camp 7
By sorinfurcoi
08 Mar 2014

Mole refugee camp, Zongo, DRC. A family has a makeshift shop in front of their shelter. They sell cigarettes and root vegetables collected from the forest.

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Boyabu Camp 14
By sorinfurcoi
05 Mar 2014

Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. People circulating in the camp.

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Boyabu Camp 21
By sorinfurcoi
04 Mar 2014

Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. A girl at the Boyabu refugee camp, after a school day.

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Mole Camp 4
By sorinfurcoi
08 Mar 2014

Mole refugee camp, Zongo, DRC. Children in the camp. Many of the children arrived in the camp with neighbors or distant relatives. They were separated from their families while trying to flee the violence in Central Africa Republic.

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Boyabu Camp 23
By sorinfurcoi
04 Mar 2014

Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. UNHCR delivering aid to Boyabu and Mole refugee camps is very difficult. The only way to access them is from the Oubangui river or through jungle dirt roads. It can take weeks for the aid to reach the camp.

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Boyabu Camp 15
By sorinfurcoi
05 Mar 2014

Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. Despite the fact that living conditions in the refugee camps are often better than the living conditions of the local Congolese population, Central African refugees are most often welcomed by the local communities.

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Boyabu Camp 22
By sorinfurcoi
04 Mar 2014

Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. Food distribution for families happens on different days than for single people. People queue for hours to get their small share of flour, oil, salt and soap.

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Boyabu Camp 20
By sorinfurcoi
04 Mar 2014

Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. School children after school. They were proudly displaying their notebooks.

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Mole Camp 1
By sorinfurcoi
08 Mar 2014

Mole refugee camp, Zongo, DRC. Refugees sell fruits and roasted peanuts to earn some money.

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Boyabu Camp 9
By sorinfurcoi
05 Mar 2014

Boyabu refugee camp, Lebenge, DRC. Families spend hours together in front of their small shelter.