ayubsumbal Malik Ayub Sumbal

Malik Ayub Sumbal is an accomplished investigative journalist, currently based in Islamabad Pakistan. Malik has won the Syracuse University Mirror Award for 2012; The S.I. Newhouse School of Communications at Syracuse University confers the Mirror Awards annually to honor excellence in reporting on the media industry.

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Pakistan: Peshawar Army Public School...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
11 Jan 2015

Class is back in session at Peshawar's Army Public School, the target of a brutal attack by Taliban militants that killed 141 people in mid-December. Parents and their children were eager to tell media that despite the attacks, they are not afraid and that their children shouldn't have to live in fear in order to get an education. A ceremony was held as schools across Pakistan re-opened after an extended break in the wake of the attack.

Context:

In the morning on Dec 16, 2014 six Taliban fighters entered Peshawar’s Army Public School under orders to let the youngest children leave and to kill everyone else. The killing spree took the lives of 141 people, among them 132 children. This was the latest in a years-long string of attacks against Pakistani civilians and military and government institutions, starting with the alleged assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto in 2007. The Pakistani Taliban’s targeting of educational institutions, however, is not new, including an attack on a school bus in 2011, the attempt on the life of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai in 2012, and now the tragic killing of over a hundred students in the Peshawar school.

Media created

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Rescue Work After Heavy Floods in Nor...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
27 Jul 2015

Rescue work footage after floods hit the city of Peshawar in northern Pakistan on July 27th, 2015.

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Northern Pakistan Heavy Rain and Floods
Chitral
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
27 Jul 2015

Footage of floods in Northern Pakistan and Chitral District and other areas.

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Hindu Pilgrims Reach for Katasraj in ...
Chakwal
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
15 Feb 2015

Every year a large number of Hindu visit Katasraj temples. Katasraj is a Hindu temple complex situated in Katas village near Choa Saidanshah in the Chakwal district of Punjab in Pakistan. Dedicated to Shiva, the temple has, according to Hindu legend, existed since the days of Mahābhārata and the Pandava brothers spent a substantial part of their exile at the site. The Pakistan Government is considering nominating the temple complex for World Heritage Site status. In 2007, it also proposed to restore the temple complex. In 2012, the temple pond is drying up due to heavy use of ground water for industrial purposes. But this year there are only 26 pilgrims visited for the performance of their religious rituals.

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Weapons Training for Pakistan Teachers
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
31 Jan 2015

In the morning on Dec 16, 2014 six Taliban fighters entered Peshawar’s Army Public School under orders to let the youngest children leave and to kill everyone else. The killing spree took the lives of 141 people, among them 132 children. Pakistani military retook control of the school after hours of fighting, saying that all nine insurgents were dead.

After the Peshawar school attack, the Pakistani government has decided to train school teachers to operate handguns, as well as Kalashnikov rifles, for their own safety and the protection of students.

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Peshawar Demonstrators in Solidarity ...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
13 Jan 2015

A group of Sunni clerics protested today in Peshawar, Pakistan against the Charlie Hebdo magazine and praised the two brothers who killed 11 of its employees and a police officer on 7 January in Paris. They also held a prayer ceremony for the killers and praised the attackers' actions, saying Said and Cherif Kouachi delivered justice against the cartoonists who disrespected the Holy Prophet Muhammad. The clerics made a clear distinction between the recent Taliban attack on the Peshawar Army School, which they wholly condemned, and this latest attack saying that the gunmen in Paris were justified in their killings because of the blasphemy committed by Charlie Hebdo.

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Pakistan: Peshawar Army Public School...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
10 Jan 2015

Class is back in session at Peshawar's Army Public School, the target of a brutal attack by Taliban militants that killed 141 people in mid-December. Parents and their children were eager to tell media that despite the attacks, they are not afraid and that their children shouldn't have to live in fear in order to get an education. A ceremony was held as schools across Pakistan re-opened after an extended break in the wake of the attack.

Context:

In the morning on Dec 16, 2014 six Taliban fighters entered Peshawar’s Army Public School under orders to let the youngest children leave and to kill everyone else. The killing spree took the lives of 141 people, among them 132 children. This was the latest in a years-long string of attacks against Pakistani civilians and military and government institutions, starting with the alleged assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto in 2007. The Pakistani Taliban’s targeting of educational institutions, however, is not new, including an attack on a school bus in 2011, the attempt on the life of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai in 2012, and now the tragic killing of over a hundred students in the Peshawar school.

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Pakistan: Peshawar Army Public School...
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
11 Jan 2015

Class is back in session at Peshawar's Army Public School, the target of a brutal attack by Taliban militants that killed 141 people in mid-December. Parents and their children were eager to tell media that despite the attacks, they are not afraid and that their children shouldn't have to live in fear in order to get an education. A ceremony was held as schools across Pakistan re-opened after an extended break in the wake of the attack.

Context:

In the morning on Dec 16, 2014 six Taliban fighters entered Peshawar’s Army Public School under orders to let the youngest children leave and to kill everyone else. The killing spree took the lives of 141 people, among them 132 children. This was the latest in a years-long string of attacks against Pakistani civilians and military and government institutions, starting with the alleged assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto in 2007. The Pakistani Taliban’s targeting of educational institutions, however, is not new, including an attack on a school bus in 2011, the attempt on the life of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai in 2012, and now the tragic killing of over a hundred students in the Peshawar school.

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A Pakistani, Wrongly Accused and Tort...
Pattan, Kohistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
24 Dec 2014

Kamil Shah was held in US-run Bagram prison in Afghanistan for five years, where he was wrongly accused of belong to a terrorist group and tortured by American authorities he assumes were working for the CIA. Just seventeen at the time of his arrest in 2004, Kamil was eventually found and contacted in prison by the ICRC before being released and taken back to his family in their village in Pakistan.

"People suffer terribly when they lose contact with their loved ones and don't know where they are or whether they are safe," said Yuriy Shafarenko, a spokesperson of the ICRC in Islamabad. "Kamil Shah was one of those who we helped through the ICRC's Restoring Family Links program."

The ICRC declined to speak about the conditions Shah faced in prison or whether or not he was tortured.

However, the physical, emotional and mental trauma he suffered still plague Shah to this day. He says he is unable to concentrate and is haunted by his experiences in prison. Education seems out of reach for the young man who married in 2010 and works manual labor to make ends meet.

The recent revelations in a US senate report detailing the CIA’s torture program give little comfort to the former inmate who witnessed the worst of the program during the five years he was imprisoned. Shah says he demands justice from world authorities for the torture he faced and the long term effects it has had on him, including his inability to meaningfully undertake education. He questions how the US will compensate victims for the crime which they have had committed against them.

The interview is one of the first given by a torture victim detailing from experience how inmates like Kamil were treated. After the 5 years of jail, he says he doesn’t feel like himself. Here Kamil Shah gives an inside look into the life of a torture victim, how he struggles to live in society now, and the pain this causes families of released inmates.

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STOCK FOOTAGE: Parliament House Islam...
Islamabad
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
19 May 2011

Stock footage of Pakistan's Parliament Building in Islamabad.

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STOCK FOOTAGE: Nawaz Shareef in Peshawar
Peshawar
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
22 Dec 2014

Pakistan's PM Nawaz Sharif speaks to local officials on his visit to Peshawar, just months before the Taliban attack that killed 141 people.

Selected soundbites:

00:43 to 00: 50 Despite the government has lack of resources but we are committed to serve the people of Pakistan.

1: 36 to 1: 46
I don't know why there is protest in Karachi and who are protesting.

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STOCK FOOTAGE: Street Scenes from Pak...
Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
16 Jul 2013

General streets scenes (busy streets with markets, people walking, shops)

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Pakistan: Deadly Taliban Attack on Pe...
Peshawar
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
16 Dec 2014

In the morning on Dec 16, 2014 six Taliban fighters entered Peshawar’s Army Public School under orders to let the youngest children leave and to kill everyone else. The killing spree took the lives of 141 people, among them 132 children. Pakistani military retook control of the school after hours of fighting, saying that all nine insurgents were dead.

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The Plight of IDPs from Taliban’s str...
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
07 Jul 2014

5 July 2014
Banu and Bakha Kheal IDP Camp, North Waziristan, Pakistan

Fighting between the Pakistani army and insurgents has created 700,000 Internally Displaced Peoples (IDPs) in the region of North Waziristan, a tribal area where the Taliban has a strong hold. Surrounded by mountains which border Afghanistan, North Waziristan was known to be a hub for home-grown militants and foreign Jihadi groups, and for most members of the Taliban, it has long been a safe haven. However, after peace talks with Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) collapsed, the Pakistani army launched a military offensive against militants based in the area, and thousands of civilians were told to leave their homes.

These people migrated from North Waziristan to the cities of Bannu, Kohat and other urbanised areas of the Khyber Pakthoonkhaw (KP) province, but were given such short notice that they had little time to gather their belongings. Many are now completely homeless and are waiting for aid and compensation, promised to them by the government. They feel neglected and lied to by their government.

However government personnel maintain that they are providing the IDPs with aid and the promised pecuniary compensation of Rs. 12,000 ($120). The government claims that peace will be restored to the region but most IDP’s are of a different opinion and do not believe they will return to their homes for at least another five to six years.

Interviews:

Ajbat Khan, an IDP. First Soundbite. “My name is Ajbat Khan from Mir Ali. I have migrated only because of the war and the gunship helicopters. Our life has been destroyed because of this war.”

Hilala Khan, an IDP complaining about the government staff for not paying the owed amount. Second Soundbite. “The people here are not giving us the compensation amount that they promised. They are corrupt and giving an amount which they feel like. He is saying that these documents are fake, he is lying. He is not giving me Rs. 12000.”

Imran Ahmed, the relief site worker, Third Soundbite. “We are giving Rs. 12000 to the head of each family along with foods and other goods, provided by donors, to distribute among themselves..”

Ajbat Khan, an IDP. Fourth Soundbite. “There are innocent people and the civilians who are dying in this war, women and children. The people’s lives have been ruined and our social setup has been destroyed. That why we have migrated from Mir Ali to Bannu and traveled on foot for seven hours”

Ajbat Khan, an IDP. Fifth Soundbite. “Several people, women and children, died during the long walk because of the lack of water and the scorching temperature"

Ajbat Khan, an IDP. Sixth Soundbite. “It does not look possible that the peace will be restored in this area. It will take us several years to return back to our homes because everything has been destroyed by the war.”

Shot List:

− Various shots of: File footage of the operation provided. − Various shots of: Shots of the Banu city where the IDPs have migrated in a large number. − Various shots of: Shots of the long queues of the IDPs. − Various shots of: Shots of the Registration of IDPs females in veils, a variety of shots. − Various shots of: Shots of the relief camp setup by the various donors agencies. − Various shots of: Shots of the trucks unloading the relief items and goods. − Various shots of: Shots of the registration of the females IDPs. − Various shots of: Shots of piles of the relief goods a variety of the shots. − Various shots of: Shots the IDPs arguing with the staff by not giving them relief good and the compensation amount announced by the government. − Various shots of: Shots of the IDPs getting amount from the relief staff. − Various shots of: Shots of the verification of the IDPs by the government database van. − Various shots of: Shots of the IDPs registration. − Various shots of: Shots of the distribution of the relief goods. − Various shots of: Shots of the mix scenes from the relief camp in Banu − Various shots of: Mix shots.

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Bubli: A Transgender Guru in Pakistan
By Malik Ayub Sumbal
19 Jun 2014

June 17, 2014
Rawalpindi, Pakistan

Bubli is a transgender woman living in Pakistan, a country marked by its religious conservatism. She has been punished both by her family and her society, who view her, and others like her, as an embarrassment. Seeking refuge from mistreatment she moved to Rawalpindi, south of Islamabad, and, over a decade, created a commune and safe haven for members of the transgender community. Here Bubli advises and looks after these people who have been ostracized by their society.

Bubli is a ‘Guru’, or senior member of the transgender community. Gurus like Bubli are highly respected and honored among the transgender community in Pakistan and many come to Bubli’s house to find support and share their problems. When this report was shot, more than 30 to 40 transgender people were gathered in her small house. Most of them found shelter there after being kicked out of their homes by their families and neighbors.

Transgender people, also known “hijras” in Pakistan and India, not only face banishment from their families, they also face rampant physical and sexual abuse in society in general. Many of them are sexually abused and harassed in the streets. Discrimination against the transgender community continues even after their death. Normally they are denied graves and funeral services in Muslim graveyards.

Bubli has been working and campaigning for transgender rights in Pakistan for the ten years. In 2013, the hijras won a key legal battle to have a third gender-option on national ID cards. There is also an increasing acceptance of hijras in Pakistani society, but progress is slow. About 50,000 Pakistanis are classified as hijras, which includes self-proclaimed transgender men and women, as well as transvestites, intersexed and eunuchs.

Shot List:

− The bazzar near Bubli house located in Rawalpindi. Transgender people preparing for cooking in Bubli’s house. A lot of shots. − Various shots of:

− Transgender people cutting vegetables in Bubli’s home.

− Transgender people in Bubli’s house chatting to each other.

− Transgender people eating fruit in Bubli’s house.

− Transgender people entering in Bubli’s house.

− Bubli talking with the transgender people who were kicked out of their homes by their neighbors.

− Transgender dancing.

− Transgender coming out of Bubli’s home.

− Eunuchs purchasing cosmetics from a shop.

− The street going towards the graveyard.

− The cemetery.

Interviews:

− Bubli, Guru in the transgender community

− Muhammad Ijaz, neighbor

− Nazia, a transgender member of Bibli’s group

Interview Transcript:

Bubli:

“I belong to a respectable middle class family. At the age of four I was punished by my family for acting like a female and wearing women’s clothes. I have always been subjected offensive and discriminatory behavior from my family, class fellows and society but after a while it becomes intolerable and unbearable, and forced me to leave them all.”

“But when I came here to this world and community, I realized that these are my own people, we are all alike and there is nothing strange about us. We are all similar. All the world rejections and depravities we have left here in this transgender community we have left behind and we are very happy because we are sharing the sorrows of each other.”

“The people who have been grown up in the depravities and miseries and like rolling stone they don’t rejected or neglect others. They don’t create trouble for others and always spread the smiles in the world and like this they pass from this world.”

“The Pakistani community is a long way from giving rights to transgender people. They always treat them badly but they should know that the third gender are also human beings and should be treated like this.”

“Transgender life started from the sexual abuse by the various people in their families, neighbors or somewhere else. Due to their beautiful looks and female similarities they are an easy target for the sexual desires of others, subsequently these transgender people become sex workers and then society cannot accept him or her.”

“I am working for the rights of the transgender people in Pakistan and have founded an Organization called “Wajood”. We are working for the welfare and the medical treatment of third gender people because there are a lot of issues regarding health.”

“A Guru is basically just like mother or father who helps out and guides the children because these transgender pople are just like our own kids. The Gurus give them the love of a parent. These are all my children and I am their Guru. They came here for the solution to their problems. The government of Pakistan has issued them with the Identity Card but there is no value of this card and it is also a source of disrespect to him because there is written Transgender in his sexual category.”

Muhammad Ijaz:

“The transgender people are really very nice and friendly to us, they never ever create any problems for us. They always smile and are happy with others. In fact they are great people.”

Nazia:

“The Guru is very important for us, like our mother or father. It’s just like a family and the Guru fulfills all our needs and requirements.”

Bubli:

“There are several myths about the funerals of the transgender people, as people think that they have been buried without funeral prayers and very secretly because the society even don’t accept them here in the graveyard. People generally mock it, it’s really deplorable but now there are a few graves here in this cemetery because people have now a little awareness and are starting to treat transgender people as human beings.”