Tracey Shelton Tracey Shelton

I have been working as a foreign correspondent for 12 years, covering the Middle East and South East Asia. I work with both written and visual media and specialise in multimedia presentations and short-form documentaries. My reports cover breaking news, investigative reporting and in-depth features.

I use an immersive style of reporting which is quite different to most. I often spend weeks, months or longer living with local people and experiencing to the extent possible what life is like for them. I mostly work alone on a project from start to finish — shooting, writing, reporting, producing and editing. I find the stories I believe need to be told and spend the time I need to understand them.

Some of my most notable work includes exclusive reporting on Gaddafi’s capture and death in Libya, 2011 which led to the opening of a UN enquiry, and coverage from Aleppo, Syria in 2012/13 that frequently trended on social media raising global awareness.​ My work has won 17 international journalism awards including a George Polk, a Peabody, and a POYi award for multimedia. I was also nominated for International Journalist of the Year and International Multimedia Journalist of the Year in 2014 and 2015.

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Escape to Europe Hidden in the Back o...
Bastad
By Tracey Shelton
03 Nov 2015

Two teenage Syrian girls describe the harrowing journey from Syria to Sweden, just two of 1,049,716 who made the journey to Europe to seek asylum from conflict in 2015.

Full Stroy:

BÅSTAD, Sweden – The two girls huddled together bracing against the bumps and jerks of the long journey. In the darkness they could see the outline of the other refugees who shared their ride, but it was too dark to see their faces.

Suddenly, a small window slid open at the front of the truck container. A man’s voice yelled to the group of occupants to be silent. A hush fell over the travelers as the girls wondered where they were, and what danger was lurking on the other side of their metal box.

“The hardest part is not knowing where you are – just the inside of a truck,” said Reny Borro, 15, who now lives in a refugee camp in Sweden. Sitting next to her at the table was her best friend and former travel companion Hanin Atbash.

“We didn’t even know if it was night or day because we were always in the dark. It smelled so horrible in there,” recalled Hanin, who lives in another camp 15km away.

The girls were on a 10-day journey set to change their lives entirely. Any hope of going home had been shattered years ago by the conflict that ignited in 2011, forcing their families to flee to Turkey. Now, they were on route to Sweden.

“The [driver] would open the door and he would just say ‘Move! Move! Fast! Fast!’” Hanin said, recalling how every few days the group would change vehicles. “He was really rude with us. We’d just move from this truck to another truck. He’d say don’t ask where we are or what we’re doing. Just move. That’s how we came here.”

Together with their mothers, young brothers and Hanin’s father, they were a living cargo being shipped across the continent for tens of thousands in cash.

Life in Syria

The girls, now 15, were not yet teenagers when the conflict began four and half years ago.

“Life was normal, happy,” said Reny as she described her childhood in Aleppo, Syria. “Going to school, going to my grandmothers. Being cooked the best food. We had our home. I had my room, my friends. Then all the problems started.”

Reny is Kurdish, a minority group that make up around 10% of the Syrian population. Before the revolution began, Reny said her class paid no attention to religious and ethnic differences.

“We were all friends,” she said.

But as the revolution gained momentum divisions and distrust set in.

“We weren’t a class anymore,” Reny said.

One day, Reny’s brother, then 7, came home in tears. His best friend, also a Kurd, had been beaten by Arab students at school.

“He saw this happen and was so scared and crying,” she said. “From that time on, we didn’t go to school.”

The day the bombing started in Aleppo, Reny’s father booked them all bus tickets to stay with his relatives in the Kurdish town of Qamishli. They packed light planning to return within a few days, leaving almost everything they owned behind including crucial documents and personal treasures.

“I have no idea if my house is still there, or if my room is still standing,” said Reny.

Meanwhile, in Damascus, things were heating up in Hanin’s neighborhood.

“When the protests started it was pretty scary because there were a lot of kidnappings and things, so we stayed at home mostly. But in our area, bombs might come over at any time,” Hanin said.

People had begun to disappear. Thousands were arrested first by government forces and later by ad hoc rebel groups and criminal gangs. Kidnappings to extort money from families were on the increase by all sides. Anyone, young or old, could be targeted.

Hanin spoke of one incident when her mother, held up by street protests and road blocks, was late in picking her up from school. As she waited alone, a group of young men began to gather across the street, staring and pointing in her direction. Scared she walked on but the group followed, all the time watching her.

“I was so scared they were going to kidnap me,” Hanin said. “Then my mother came. I was so scared I was shouting at her in the car for being late. From that day on, I stopped going to school.”

Escaping the chaos

Soon after, Hanin’s father, who had already fled conflict in his native Palestine over a decade before, decided to pack up his family and flee again. But leaving was not so easy. Others who had tried were arrested and imprisoned by the government, disappeared at checkpoints, or simply vanished on route. They were going to need a smuggler.

“We didn’t know who this man was. We didn’t know anything about him,” Hanin said, describing the driver who collected them from her grandfather’s house silently in the dead of night. “He covered his face so we couldn’t even see him. We just gave him the money and got into the truck.”

The trip from Damascus to the Turkish border, normally a mere 4-hour drive, took one week.

“There were other families [in the truck] but we didn’t know them or even speak with them. We couldn’t even see each other. We’d just see some bodies when the door opened,” Hanin said.

The family had no idea where they were or what was going on around them. Silently they prayed in the darkness they were heading out of Syria and no one would catch them along the way.

“[The driver] would give us something – I can’t call it food – just something to stop the hunger. For the bathroom we had to hold it most of the time."

When they arrived safely in Turkey, Hanin said they saw their travel companions for the first time. 

"We were all like, “Oh my God, were you the families with us in the truck?” It was kind of like freedom because I was so scared in Syria and then in the truck thinking the police could take us at ay time. We were really scared. So it was a relief.”

In Turkey, Hanin met Reny whose family had also fled there from the Kurdish region which was now under threat from extremist forces who had developed a bitter rivalry with the Kurdish militia groups.

To Europe in the back of a truck

For more than a year, the two families struggled in Turkey without legal status or decent work. Finally, with all hope of returning to Syria lost, they began planning an escape to Europe.

Reny’s mother ruled out sea travel as stories of boat wrecks and drowning’s trickled back to them every week. Last year, the Missing Migrants Project recorded 3,771 dead or missing in the Mediterranean Sea on route to Europe.  

So a journey by truck was planned. But the smugglers were notorious for swindles and more deadly deceits, so Reny’s father stayed behind in Turkey with the smugglers, ready to pay as soon as he received word that the two families had arrived safely.

Again Hanin sat in the dark, never knowing where they were or if they would make it. But on this journey she had a friend and the girls became a great comfort to each other.

“This time if we die, we die together,” Hanin said. But still she became overwhelmed by fear and sadness as she thought of her grandparents and others she left behind.

“I was terrified and overthinking. Our parents tried their best to comfort us and talk with us. I was mostly in my mother’s arms. Then one day, [the driver] just opened the door and said ok you are here, go and do whatever you want. That was it. We didn’t have anything to say to each other, even thank you because he was so rude with us.”

The girls found themselves in Sweden. This time it was Reny who struggled. She missed her father deeply and had received news that he was ill and would undergo surgery in Turkey alone.

“I felt so bad inside,” Reny said. “Everything was different. I couldn’t understand the language. I was feeling so empty…[The immigration center] was full of people smelling so bad. It was horrible.”

After a few days they were sent to a camp. Reny described their tiny room as smelly and dirty.

“Our room didn’t even have a toilet.”

The family soon moved to a second camp in Bastad. Although the room she shared with her brother and mother was small, it was clean, but still Reny struggled with her emotions.

“For 10 days I didn’t leave the room. I didn’t eat. I didn’t talk to anyone.”

The start of a new life

Reny soon settled and began making friends and attending Swedish classes with other refugee students. Seven months later, both families are still waiting for a decision to be made about their residency applications. But already the girls are enjoying their new stable lives and making plans for their futures.

With her passion for languages, Reny hopes to work as a translator. Hanin wants to study psychology.

“It’s great in Sweden! We can look up at the sky and nothing is following us. There’s no danger. Its quiet, no people screaming,” Hanin said. ”Here I can reach my dreams.”

Overall, they say the Swedes have been kind and welcoming, but things aren’t always smooth.

“There are some Swedish people that don’t want us here,” Reny said. “Cars come past the camp and they stick up their fingers or yell bad words – these are the people that have closed minds. But on the other hand, there are many good people and I’ve made a lot of friends.”

Hanin added the Swedes “have taken us all into their hearts” and have provided well for the many immigrants that continue to arrive. But religious stereotypes in the West have come as a shock.

“When people think that I am someone who would kill them, or I’m a bad person just because I’m Muslim, it makes me sad,” Hanin said.

“Everyone loves his own country. There are reasons we come here. The judgment is not good,” Reny added.

Even within the camp, it’s not always easy. Without a man in the family, Reny says she has received some harassment.

“There are some bad guys so I got hassled. Most of the women wear hijabs. As Kurdish we have a more open culture so as you can see I don’t wear one. But the camp is full of people from all over the world. Some are bad, but most are good.”

In the days following this interview, Reny’s father finally arrived in Sweden to an emotional reunion. Both families are confident they will receive their decision soon.

“When I was in Syria I felt like it’s over – everything was hopeless,” Hanin said as they reminisced about the day they emerged from the back of a truck into a very different world. “In 10 days your whole life has changed.”

Wherever they end up, the one thing the girls say they are sure of is that they will always be friends.

“We’d lived a really interesting and horrible and successful story together,” said Reny as Hanin nodded and laughed in agreement. “These days we call it an adventure. But, it was really scary. I don’t want to live it again, but it’s a memory that will never disappear.”

 

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Istanbul's Breaking Bad Cafe Chain Se...
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

In early 2014, Deniz Kosan, 28, launched Walter's Coffee Roastery, a cafe designed after the hit TV show Breaking Bad. The popular series told the story of Walter White, a high school chemistry teacher who turns to cooking meth after being diagnosed with terminal cancer. The cafe's interior is loosely based on White's meth superlab complete with Hazmat suits, gas masks, a giant periodic table and coffee served in beakers and test tubes. The cafe has proved to be a raging success among locals and tourists alike. Now Kosan is set to expand his coffee superlab worldwide with a soft opening set for New York March 2016 and later Europe. Franchisers are also underway in Russia, UAE and the UK. Coining a phrase from his cafe's name sake, Kosan says, "We're not in the coffee business. We're in the empire business."

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The Streets of Kirkuk
Kirkuk
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

KIRKUK, Iraq — For decades, the oil-rich city of Kirkuk has been the epicenter of a territorial dispute between the Iraqi central government and the semi-autonomous Kurdish region.

When Sunni militants seized control of a large area of north and central Iraq, they surrounded Kirkuk from two sides, cutting off the city's land borders from the central government. Kurdish forces wasted no time moving in to secure Kirkuk from Islamic State militants gaining control of what they claim to be Kurdish land.

But the population of Kirkuk is diverse with Turkmen, Kurds, Arabs and both Assyrian and Chaldean Christians who all likewise stake a claim to this historical land.

The city has frequently been described as a "powder keg" of racial hostility waiting to explode, though the streets of Kirkuk tell a different story. Amid political conflict and instability, citizens have lived side by side and mixed freely for centuries. Between the police roadblocks and front lines that surround it, the generosity and welcoming nature of the people of Kirkuk give hope for the future of this extraordinary city.

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Kurdish Forces Try to Retake Sinjar f...
Sinjar Mountains
By Tracey Shelton
19 Jan 2015

On August 3, the Islamic State began a brutal campaign to seize control of the city of Sinjar and it's surrounds. The majority Yazidi population fled to the nearby Sinjar Mountians where many died from the elements during a several week seige. Those captured were either executed or kidnapped and forced to convert from their ancient religious beliefs to Islam. Women and children were taken as slaves, the women sold as concubines to militants throughout Islamic State held Iraq and Syria. 

This month, a combined Kurdish force of Iraqi Peshmerga, Turkish PKK, Syrian YPG and Yazidi milita groups launched an assault to retake Sinjar. The battle continues with daily clashes as Kurdish focres, who currently hold around 15% of the city, fight with international air support against a ruthless enemy.

 

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ANZAC Cove, Gallipoli
Turkey
By Tracey Shelton
22 Apr 2014

As the centenary of the battle for Gallipoli nears, visitors flock to the memorial sites that dot the peninsula. April 25 marks 99 years since allied troops first landed at ANZAC Cove in an unsuccessful attempt to take the peninsula and push forward to Constantinople (modern day Istanbul).

Of the foreign tourists, the vast majority are Australian or New Zealand citizens coming to pay their respects to the ANZAC allied forces who died in this epic battle of the First World War. But each year, around 1.5 million Turks also flock to the memorial sites that celebrate the victory of Commander Mustafa Kemal Atatürk who later went on to become Turkey's first president and founder of the Turkish republic. They also come to mourn the more than 86,000 Turkish fighters that lost their lives in the successful defence of their coastline. During the First World War, Turkish forces fought on nine fronts. The only victory was at Gallipoli.

132,000 died in the nine month Gallipoli campaign. Among the dead were more than 8,700 Australians, over 2750 New Zealanders, around 10,000 French, almost 22,000 British soldiers and more than 7,500 Indians.

Next year, during the 100th anniversary, tour operators say they expect to see unprecedented crowds with around 3 million visitors expected throughout the year.

By Tracey Shelton

GALLIPOLI, Turkey – Ninety-nine years ago, on a pristine beach off the coast of the Gallipoli Peninsular, 132,000 men lost their lives.

Every Australian and New Zealander knows the tale. We are taught it in school. We watch movies depicting the massacre, and every year on April 25 we pay our respects to the fallen war heroes.

But as the centenary of this historic event nears, it is not only allied forces that are making the pilgrimage to Gallipoli.

Standing among a small tour group of five Australians and one New Zealander last week, buses loaded with Turkish visitors stopped to swarm the memorials and peer at the statues depicting both foreign and Turkish troops.

“This is an important part of Turkish history as well,” said Turkish tour guide Ercan Yavuz. “We study about this battle from primary school to college. In World War 1, the Turkish army were fighting on nine different fronts. This was their only victory.”

Yavuz said an average 2 million people visit the Gallipoli memorials annually. Around three quarters are Turkish.

The Turkish tour route differs somewhat from that of the well-worn ANZAC trail. A visit to the local museum that tells a victorious tale from the Turkish side is generally not included on foreign tours, Yavuz explained. Neither are many of the Turkish burial grounds. But the tour paths frequently overlap.

One statue depicts the story of a Turkish soldier who emerged from the safety of his bunker to save a dying enemy fighter. According to the account retold later at the scene by Australian governor Lord Richard Casey, the man had raised a white flag tied to the muzzle of his rifle after he heard his enemy screaming in agony. He carried the man across enemy lines, delivering him to his comrades in the allied trenches before running back to continue the battle. Such stories of bravery and mutual respect between enemies lead to the common reference to the battle of Gallipoli as ‘the last gentlemen’s war’.

A large monument, situated near ANZAC Cove, drives home the solidarity between enemy sides that developed soon after the war ended. It immortalizes the words of the then newly appointed president Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, who rose to fame by leading his men to victory at Gallipoli, “Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives…you are now lying in the soil of a friendly country. Therefore rest in peace.”

In almost nine months, the allied forces failed to gain significant ground from any of the multiple positions they held along the coastline. On January 9, 1916, the last of the allied troops withdrew. They had lost over 46,000 men including more then 8,700 Australians.

It was a major victory for Ataturk and the Turkish people, but more than 86,000 lost their lives to win. In a famous speech, also enshrined on a wall at the Turkish memorial site, Ataturk commanded his men, “I am not ordering you to attack. I am ordering you to die.”

Yavuz explained that for Turks, a visit to Gallipoli is not just about celebrating a victory but also mourning a great loss. And adding to the sadness and frustration, it is almost impossible for Turkish descendants to find the graves of their ancestors. Yavuz explained that prior to 1934 and the establishment of the ‘Surname Law”, there were no family names in Turkish culture. Gravestones simply contain a first name and father’s first name, making it almost impossible to determine family ties to the names carved on the memorial stones.

“It is an emotional place for you and it is also emotional for us,” said Emin Yurdalan, operations manager at ANZAC Hotel for the past eight years. “Even for us Turks it is a sad place. We won the battle, but war is war. It is always sad.”

Yurdalon said the feedback he gets from his guests who visit the Gallipoli site is always positive. The solemn atmosphere of the site, which is a national park, provides a fitting atmosphere to pay respects, particularly during the April 25 service. This year, numbers are expected to double, but next year, Yurdalon says he expects the centenary year to be a busy one with an estimated 3 million visitors throughout the year.

When asked if they still had rooms available for April next year Yurdalon answered, “We sold out three years ago!”

The number of visitors for the April 25 morning memorial service for 2015 is limited to 10,500. Tickets were awarded to 8,000 Australians and 2,000 New Zealanders via a lottery draw. Official guests will fill the remaining 500 places.

Many of those who didn’t make the draw, like 29-year-old Mark Dean, are making their journey this year.

“It is pretty amazing to be standing right here after hearing the stories since I was kid,” Dean said as he stood on a ridge overlooking ANZAC Cove last week. “I have two relatives that fought here, so this is a special moment for me and I must admit, I even got a bit emotional at the gravesite. I will definitly be coming back for another visit next year.”

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Scenes from Syria
Idlib
By Tracey Shelton
18 May 2012

Thousands protest against the Syrian government during a Friday rally in Sarjah, Jabal al-Zawia.
1,049,716 refugees made the journey to Europe to seek asylum from conflict in 2015. The majority came from Syria making a dangerous journey by boat or by land with dreams of a new and safer life.

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Scenes from Syria
Aleppo
By Tracey Shelton
03 Sep 2012

The bodies of 8 children lie on a back of truck waiting for burial in Aleppo. The siblings were killed in an air raid by government forces. Their tiny bodies where uncovered in the ruins by local volunteers.
Last year alone, 1,049,716 refugees made the journey to Europe to seek asylum from conflict in 2015. The majority came from Syria making a dangerous journey by boat or by land with dreams of a new and safer life.

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Scenes from Syria
Aleppo
By Tracey Shelton
24 Apr 2012

A mother is escorted from the body of her only son at a hospital in Afrin, Aleppo province.
1,049,716 refugees made the journey to Europe to seek asylum from conflict in 2015. The majority came from Syria making a dangerous journey by boat or by land with dreams of a new and safer life.

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Journey to Europe
Bastad
By Tracey Shelton
02 Nov 2015

Asylum seekers receive food at a camp in Bastad, Sweden.

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Journey to Europe
Bastad
By Tracey Shelton
03 Nov 2015

Volunteers conduct free Swedish lessons in a camp in Bastad, Sweden.

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Journey to Europe
Bastad
By Tracey Shelton
28 Oct 2015

Refugees awaiting asylum play football at a camp in Bastad, Sweden.

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Journey to Europe
Bastad
By Tracey Shelton
28 Oct 2015

Rooms for single men at the refugee camp in Bastad, Sweden.

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Journey to Europe
Bastad
By Tracey Shelton
03 Nov 2015

Hanin Atbash and Reny Borro pose together for a photo in Bastad, Sweden. The two best friends hid in the back of a truck to escape the conflict in Syria and travel to Europe to begin a new life. They now live in refugee camps in Southern Sweden awaiting their refugee application decisions.

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Journey to Europe
Bastad
By Tracey Shelton
03 Nov 2015

Syrian refugee Hanin Atbash, 15, in her new home in Bastad, Sweden.

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Journey to Europe
Bastad
By Tracey Shelton
03 Nov 2015

Syrian refugee Reny Borro, 15, in her new home in Bastad, Sweden.

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Interview with UNHCR's Antonio Guterres
New York
By Tracey Shelton
29 Sep 2015

Interview with Antonio Guterres, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and actor Ger Duany, UN Goodwill ambassador, on September 29, 2015. Private interview with UN Foundation fellows.

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Actress Frieda Pinto Speaks at UN Summit
New York
By Tracey Shelton
28 Sep 2015

Frieda Pinto, actress and activist, speaks about why she is a feminist at the UN Social Good Summit in New York, USA, on September 28, 2015. Pinto is best known for her role in the movie Slum Dog Millionaire.

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Actress Ashley at UN Social Good Summit
New York
By Tracey Shelton
28 Sep 2015

Actress Ashley Judd speaks to UN Foundation fellows about her work with young women, victims of sex trafficking and mental health in a private interview at the UN Social Good Summit in New York on September 28, 2015.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 02
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Walter's Cafe owner Deniz Kosan plans out his new coffee empire in front of the "wall of fame" styled on the periodic table. In October Walter's Cafe will launch a Kick Starter campiagn for the opening of their second cafe in New York City. Major contributors will have their names listed on the "wall of fame" in the new branch.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 03
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Walter's Cafe owner Deniz Kosan plans out his new coffee empire in front of the "wall of fame" styled on the periodic table. In October Walter's Cafe will launch a Kick Starter campiagn for the opening of their second cafe in New York City. Major contributors will have their names listed on the "wall of fame" in the new branch.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 04
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Staff meticulously prepare coffee in beakers and test tubes at Walter'€™s Coffee Roastery in Istanbul.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 05
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Staff meticulously prepare coffee in beakers and test tubes at Walter'€™s Coffee Roastery in Istanbul.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 06
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Staff meticulously prepare coffee in beakers and test tubes at Walter'€™s Coffee Roastery in Istanbul.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 07
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

At Walter's Cafe - the Breaking Bad stlyled coffee laboratory - even the plants are potted in beakers and boiling flasks.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 08
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Walter's Coffee Roastery, the coffee laboratory styled after Breaking Bad's meth superlab in Istanbul, is a hit with locals and tourists and set to expand worldwide.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 11
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Staff serve coffee in beakers and test tubes at Walter'€™s Coffee Roastery, the coffee laboratory styled after Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 10
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Staff serve coffee in beakers and test tubes at Walter's Coffee Roastery, the coffee laboratory styled after Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 09
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Freshly roasted coffee beans cool in the coffee laboratory of Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be coffee chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 12
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Freshly roasted coffee sounds like popcorn as they tumble from the coffee roaster at Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be cafe chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 13
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Freshly roasted coffee sounds like popcorn as they tumble from the coffee roaster at Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be cafe chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 14
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Freshly roasted coffee sounds like popcorn as they tumble from the coffee roaster at Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be cafe chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 15
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Goktug Akay roasts a new batch of coffee beans in the coffee laboratory of Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be coffee chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 41
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Goktug Akay roasts a new batch of coffee beans in the coffee laboratory of Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be coffee chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 47
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Goktug Akay roasts a new batch of coffee beans in the coffee laboratory of Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be coffee chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 46
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Goktug Akay checks the colour and smell of a new batch of roasting coffee beans at Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be cafe chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 44
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Freshly roasted coffee beans in Walter's coffee laboratory. The soon-to-be cafe chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 45
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Goktug Akay roasts a new batch of coffee beans in the coffee laboratory of Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be coffee chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 43
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Freshly roasted coffee beans in Walter's coffee laboratory. The soon-to-be cafe chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 42
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Goktug Akay roasts a new batch of coffee beans in the coffee laboratory of Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be coffee chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 40
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Staff meticulously prepare coffee in beakers and test tubes at Walter's Coffee Roastery in Istanbul.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 39
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Freshly roasted coffee beans cool in the coffee laboratory of Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be coffee chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 38
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Pictures and saying from the hit TV show adorn a white board in Walter's Cafe. The Breaking Bad style coffee/meth lab in Istanbul is a hit with locals and tourists and set to expand worldwide.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 37
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Freshly roasted coffee beans cool in the coffee laboratory of Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be coffee chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 36
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Freshly roasted coffee beans cool in the coffee laboratory of Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be coffee chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.

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Istanbul Coffee Shop 35
Istanbul
By Tracey Shelton
16 Jul 2014

Freshly roasted coffee beans cool in the coffee laboratory of Walter's Cafe in Istanbul. The soon-to-be coffee chain is styled after hit TV show Breaking Bad's meth superlab.