steven wassenaar Steven Wassenaar

News and documentary photographer, based in Paris, France. Produced stories for news magazines and newspapers in Turkey, Indonesia, Tunisia, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, DR Congo, Rwanda and Mali. Reports on news, conflicts and post conflicts, politics, ecology, society, health care, immigration, urbanism, mountain sports and sports. Publishes in international newspapers, web sites and magazines and collaborates with NGOs such as Doctors of the World and Solidarité Sida. Is a member of the NVJ (Dutch Association of Journalists) and the NVF (Dutch Association of Photojournalists). Clients: Paris Match, Marianne, Tribune de Genève, Hebdo Suisse, VSD, La Vie, l'Express, Témoignage Chrétien, Politis, Vrij Nederland, De Volkskrant, NRC, Helsingin Sanoma, Ouest France, Trouw, The Ecologist, Archis, De Architect, Volume, Mark, Bauwelt, Techniques & Architecture, VII men, Geographical...

Collections created

Thumb sm
THE SECRETS OF THE DUTCH FLOWER BUSIN...
Aalsmeer
By Steven Wassenaar
11 Feb 2016

The Netherlands are the leading producer of flowers, and control more than two thirds of the global market. This sector generates 250,000 full-time jobs and much of the production is industrial and done in high tech greenhouses.

Thumb sm
Hairstylist for the Migrants in Calais
Calais
By Steven Wassenaar
10 Feb 2016

Sabrina Lefebvre is a hairdresser who works in the world of luxury and fashion, but in her spare time she visits migrant camps in France to offer them free hair cuts. We followed her in Calais and Dunkirk, and in Paris during a fashion show.

During fashion shows and shoots for luxury magazines, she works between Paris, London, New York or Milan, styling the hair of the supermodels for well known fashion houses. Now based in London, the young woman assists the stars of her profession, like the Japanese hair stylist Akki Shirakawa. She could have been content to continue her ascent in this world of luxury, glitter and glamor.

But last October the path of this hairdresser, who is a true nomad, crossed that of the thousands of migrants who settled in make shift camps in Dunkirk and Calais, some mere miles from the village where she grew up. "I have travelled in poor regions of Brazil, and I know that in the worst circumstances, the poor strive to preserve their appearance. It is a question of dignity, it helps preserve the morale. And I decided to help them with my means."

As soon as she gets the chance, Sabrina spends a few days to settle in the camps to cut the hair of migrants. Through her work the young woman has earned an astonishing popularity within a few months: numerous people come to greet her and are and queuing in front of her makeshift barbershops along muddy roads or in tents.

Nothing discourages them, nor the icy wind, nor the mud, nor the jokes in Kurdish, Arabic or Farsi, that comment the mimicry of customers, who try to make understandable by gestures their hair cut requirements. Even more amazing, Sabrina became met with migrant colleagues; she now calls to wield the clippers or scissors at her side.

Thumb sm
Paris Attacks: First Responders Tend ...
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
16 Nov 2015

Several terrorist attacks in Paris left many dead and wounded on November 13, 2015. In the wake of the attacks, claimed by ISIS, French President François Hollande declared a state of emergency, as French authorities began the hunt for those responsible.

Thumb sm
Paris's 'Banlieus' : Ten Years Since ...
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
26 Oct 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Ever since, these suburbs have been the subject of stigma in the press, and in some cases of fear from those residing in central Paris. This collection of photos, shot between 2013 and 2015 shows scenes from everyday life in a few Paris suburbs. Despite being the focus of media attention after the attacks of November 13, 2015 led to a shootout in one near suburb, and mosques where 'radical' Islam is preached being shut down in others, they are - for the most part - normal neighborhoods suffering from a lack of attention from the state, and society at large.

Thumb sm
Child Labor in Gold Mines in DR Congo
South Kivu, DR Congo
By Steven Wassenaar
21 Aug 2010

Children work under harsh conditions in the gold mines in South Kivu, in the DR Congo.

Thumb sm
Paris: Femen Activists Protest Lashin...
Saudi Embassy in Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
16 Jan 2015

Six FEMEN activists rally in front of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia embassy in Paris, France and stage a protest against the flogging of Saudi blogger Raif Badawi. Badawi has been recently sentenced to ten years in jail and 1,000 lashes. He received 50 last Friday and was supposed to receive 50 more today but the punishment of this Friday was cancelled due to "medical reasons" according to his family.

Femen is a group from Ukraine, used to topless demonstrations against religions and dictatorships.

Thumb sm
France: Looking Back at Charlie Hebdo
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2012

Outrage over the killing of journalists and political cartoonists at Charlie Hebdo by masked gunment has spread across the world, and many fear an Islamophobic backlash. Our contributor brings us his photos and his account from January 2012 when he spent four days with the magazine’s staff, observing their coverage of the French Presidential race, their creative process, and the ethos of their artists and writers.

ARCHIVE PHOTOS FROM PARIS, JANUARY 2012

FULL ARTICLE UPON REQUEST

________________________________________________________

On January 7, 2015 masked gunmen entered the Paris bureau of the popular French satire magazine Charlie Hebdo and opened fire, killing twelve people, among them artists and journalists working for the magazine for years. The French government was quick to call the attack an act of terrorism, as French President Francois Hollande visited the scene of the murders just hours after police arrived. So far one 18-year-old man has turned himself in to the police, however his involvement is yet to be determined. Police have released photos of two brothers, Cherif and Said Kouachi, who they believe to be the two gunmen still at-large. Early in the evening, al-Qaida claimed responsibility for the attack, though their links to the attack are yet to be confirmed by French authorities working the case.

This isn’t the first time Charlie Hebdo comes under fire. The magazine with a circulation of about 55,000 had previously come under fire for publishing cartoons mocking Mohammed and was firebombed after publishing an earlier set of cartoons that mocked Islam. France's Muslim leaders and militants protested over the cartoons, and France's embassies were closed across the Islamic world. At the time the cartoons in Charlie Hebdo were published, often violent -- and sometimes deadly -- protests raged on across the world against an anti-Islam film made in the US that enraged many Muslims.

Thumb sm
The blocked road to England : 1500 re...
Calais
By Steven Wassenaar
08 Oct 2014

In the small city of Calais, some 1500 refugees survive with little or no money, living in tents and receiving one free meal a day from local NGOs. Because of tougher security, the road to England is blocked. Desperate refugees storm trucks in the port, hoping they will take a ferry to England. The chances of succeeding are marginal, however, as all the trucks are checked three times before reaching England.

Migrants from Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Syria, Egypt, Iraq and Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan share a vulnerable condition in a town that feels it can't handle the situation much longer. Police violence (beatings, tear gas) is often reported but hard to prove, and hundreds of refugees are living in improvised tent camps without water, sanitation or medical aid.

Thumb sm
Inside Volcano: A Journey in the Cent...
Reykjavik
By Steven Wassenaar
31 Jul 2014

Iceland: a journey in the center of the Earth

A journey to the centre of the Earth

Who has ever dreamt of exploring the centre of the Earth? In Iceland, this dream

came true. For two years, a team of mountain-climbers and engineers has

designed an open cable lift, which goes down inside volcano 130 meters deep.

Located an hour’s drive from the capital Reykjavik, the Thrihnukagigur is the only

dormant volcano in the world which has an old magma chamber, an

underground pool where the lava used to gush during eruptions (the last known

eruption took place 4,000 years ago), that can be visited. Discovered in 1991 by

the Icelandic spelunker Arni Stefansson, the ground space is equivalent to

almost three full-size basketball courts. The height is such that it would be easily

fit a 40-storey building. When Arni went to the bottom of the volcano for the first

time with a cheap rope and a motorcycle helmet, he never imagined finding such

a treasure, “No one had ever seen a place like this before. The magma chamber

is often referred to as the heart of a volcano. It’s there that the liquid rock waits to

find a way through the surface, causing a volcanic eruption. This volcano is a

rare exception because the magma seems to have disappeared.” Inside the lift,

secured by two cables tied up to the crater, the alighting starts. It is not suitable

for those who suffer from vertigo. After seven minutes, we begin the exploration

inside the bowels of the Earth. We are alone inside the world in a science fiction

setting. On the walls, sculpted by the lava, the yellow, black and red colors look

like Hell. Inside the Thrihnukagigur, the molten rock could reach temperatures

over 1000 degrees. The temperature is now more clement (8 degrees all year

long) but there is neither fauna nor flora, just a mineral chaos with basaltic rocks.

“During the last eruption, we assume that there was a huge landslide that

recovered the chamber and pulled the magma deep in the Earth”, Arni says. Has

the Thrihnukagigur revealed all its secrets? Most probably not. After an hour

visiting the volcano, it’s time to rise to the surface and dream that one day we

can go down deeper.

Islande : un voyage au centre de la Terre

Qui n’a jamais rêvé d’explorer le centre de la Terre ? En Islande, ce rêve est devenu réalité. Depuis deux ans, une équipe d’alpinistes et d’ingénieurs a mis au point un système d’ascenseur, permettant de descendre à l’intérieur d’un volcan. Situé à une heure de route de la capitale Reykjavik, le Thrihnukagigur (qui signifie les trois cratères) est le seul volcan au monde où il est possible de visiter l’ancienne chambre magmatique. Grâce à une nacelle qui descend à 130 mètres de profondeur, i lest aujourd’hui possible d’accéder à l’endroit où se formait la lave il y a 4000 ans, date de la dernière éruption. Découvert en 1974 par Arni Stefansson, un spéléologue amateur, la largeur du site équivaut à trois terrains de basketball et sa hauteur, à un immeuble de 40 étages. Lorsqu’il est descendu au fond du volcan pour la première fois, munit seulement d’une simple corde et d’un casque de moto il y a 40 ans, Arni Stefansson était loin d’imaginer découvrir un tel trésor: “On n’avait jamais rien vu de pareil. La taille de la chambre magmatique était immense. Ceci n’existe nulle part ailleurs sur Terre”, dit-il. A l’intérieur de la nacelle, arrimée par deux filins à l’entrée du cratère, la descente commence. Il ne faut pas avoir le vertige. Un gouffre noir, profond, silencieux, effrayant; voilà la première vision de cette exploration dans les entrailles de la Terre. Après sept minutes de descente, nous foulons enfin le sol volcanique sur lequel personne, auparavant, n’aurait imaginé marcher. Nous voilà seuls au monde dans un décor de science-fiction. Les parois rouges, ocres, jaunes les noirs temoignent de l’enfer qui régnait jadis à l’intérieur du Thrihnukagigur. En fusion, le magma pouvait dépasser les 1000 degrés. La température y est aujourd’hui plus clémente - 8 degrés toute l’année - mais aucune vie n’y subsiste : ni faune ni flore, juste un chaos minéral de roches basaltiques. « Lors de la dernière éruption, on suppose qu’il y eut un gigantesque éboulement qui recouvra la chambre et entraîna le magma dans les profondeurs terrestres », confie Arni Stefansson. Le Thrihnukagigur a-t-il livré tous ses secrets ? Probablement pas. Après une heure d’exploration, il est déjà temps de remonter à la surface et rêver qu’un jour, on puisse descendre encore plus profondément.

Thumb sm
Tunisia: The Guardians of The Saints
Tunis
By Steven Wassenaar
10 Feb 2014

Sitting at the entrance of the Manoubia Mausoleum in Tunis, 77 year old Zezya Riahi, remembers the night of October 16th, 2012 as if it had happened yesterday. That night, the woman who had been the caretaker of the grave of a Saint for over 45 years, was attacked by Salafi Muslims who set the mausoleum on fire. “They were five and wearing weapons. They took all my money and burned the tomb of the saint with a burning tire. A Quran and old manuscripts, which were over 1000 years old, went up in smoke. It’s a tragedy for Tunisia and its religious heritage”, she says. Since 2011, over 80 mausoleums have been destroyed or burned down by radical Muslims who believe the tombs are incompatible with the Islamic tradition and blame worshippers for associating saints in the mausoleums to Allah. These temples - the oldest was built in the 11th century - are inhabited and mostly maintained by women whose jobs are passed on to later generations. In Tunis, they are known as the "Saints’ Servers". Aged between 30 and 80 years, they are responsible for cleaning, maintaining and welcoming worshippers. They earn a living through the charity of worshippers and dedicate themselves, body and soul, to their saints. On the heights of la Marsa, a suburb of Tunis facing the Mediterranean Sea, the sisters Benfadj have been talking care of the Mausoleum Abdelaziz El-Mahdi for half a century. They live in a house adjoining the temple and have dedicated their lives to their saint. “We are his servants. We were born here and we have never worked anywhere else. We are in charge of the cleaning. We pray, we give information to worshippers. We love our saint and thank him for this beautiful life”, says 58 year old Alouma. However, on January 10th, the mausoleum was almost burned down. A jerrycan was set on fire and darkened the walls without damaging the huge tomb decorated with carpets and verses from the Quran. “These people are not Muslims, they have no religion if they destroy our heritage”, she says. Today, the two sisters are worried because none of their daughters want to take over their legacy. “Our children work hard and they are married. It is difficult for the younger generation to get involved in this work. This vocation tends to disappear “, they explain. Seraz is the guardian of the Mausoleum of Sidi Lasmer, located in the old district of "Medina" the heart of Tunis. He is the only child in his family. Before him, his mother and grandmother took turns to looking after and maintaining the gravestone of their ancestor, Sidi lasmer, who died 750 years ago. “My mother did not give birth to a girl. As a result, I am her successor. I am proud to perpetuate the tradition”, he says. However, Seraz fears for the safety of this family heritage. “When the mausoleum is open to the public, we keep a close eye on visitors. We need to pay attention. Police guards are also standing at the entrance”, he adds. This photo essay documents the lives of women like Khira, 79, guardian of the Temple of Sidi Mehrez for 50 years. Sahla l’Abidi, 82, servant of Sidi El Bechir. And Sofia, 51. These mausoleum caretakers have dedicated their lives to the saints they protect and are still looking over their graves despite the Islamist threat. On January 7, 2014 the mausoleum of Saleh Ghadbani in Kasserine was burned down. On february 24, 2014, the mausoleum of Sidi Bakai in Chawatt was also destroyed. Finally, the mausoleum of Sidi An Nawi was attacked on April 16, 2014 in Zaghouan. French: A l’entrée du mausolée de la Manoubia, à Tunis, Zezya Riahi, 77 ans, se souvient de la nuit du 16 octobre 2012 comme si c’était hier. Gardienne du tombeau de cette sainte depuis 45 ans, Zezya a été attaquée par plusieurs salafistes qui ont incendié le temple. « Ils étaient cinq et cagoulés. Ils ont volé mon argent et ont brûlé la tombe avec un pneu aspergé d’essence. Des manuscrits vieux de 1000 ans et des Coran sont partis en fumée. Au fil des conflits et des guerres de religion, jamais personne ne s’en était pris aux mausolées », souligne-t-elle. Depuis la chute de Ben Ali en 2011, les attaques contre les mausolées et les lieux de culte des confrérie soufies, très nombreux en Tunisie, se sont multipliées. Ces lieux de cultes sont dans la ligne de mire d'islamistes rigoristes qui considèrent que la prière des saints est une hérésie. Ces derniers reprochent aux musulmans de personnifier Dieu à travers des saints. Ces temples, dont les plus vieux datent du 10e siècle, sont habités et occupés majoritairement par des femmes qui se transmettent la garde de ces lieux de culte de génération en génération. A Tunis, on les appelle les servantes des saints. Agées entre 30 et 80 ans, elles sont chargées de garder, d’entretenir et accueillir les fidèles. Elles ne vivent que de l’aumône et de la charité, se dévouant corps et âmes pour leurs saints. Sur les hauteurs de la Marsa, en face de la Méditerranée, les sœurs Benfadj veillent sur le mausolée d’Abdelaziz El-Mahdi depuis un demi-siècle. Elles habitent une maisonnette mitoyenne du temple et consacrent leur vie à leur saint. « On est ses servantes. On est née ici et on s’occupe à plein temps de notre saint. On n’a jamais travaillé ailleurs, on fait le ménage, on prie, on renseigne les fidèles. On est folle de son amour et il nous le rend bien », confie Alouma, 58 ans. Le 10 janvier dernier, le mausolée a failli brûler, une bouteille d’essence enflammée a noirci les murs, sans toucher l’immense tombe décorée de draps et de versets du Coran. « Ces gens-là ne sont pas des musulmans, ils n’ont pas de religion pour détruire notre patrimoine », poursuit-elle. Aujourd’hui, les deux sœurs s’inquiètent car dans la famille, aucune de leur fille ne souhaite prendre la relève. « Elles travaillent et ont leur vie. C’est difficile pour la jeune génération de s’impliquer dans ce travail. C’est un sacerdoce qui va disparaître », conclut-elle. Au cœur de la médina, Seraz est le seul garçon de la famille. Avant lui, sa mère et sa grand-mère se sont relayées pour entretenir la tombe de leur ancêtre, Sidi lasmer, mort il y a 750 ans. « Ma mère n’a pas eu de fille, c’est moi qui m’en occupe et j’en suis plus que fier de poursuivre la lignée », dit l'homme qui craint cependant pour la sécurité de ce bien de famille. « Quand on ouvre le mausolée au public, on surveille les gens, on fait attention. La police garde aussi l’entrée », explique-t-il. Ce reportage photo illustre la vie de femmes telles que Khira, 79 ans, gardienne du temple de Sidi Mehrez depuis 50 ans, Sahla l’Abidi, 82 ans, servante de Sidi El Bechir et Sofia, 51 ans. Toutes ces femmes sont des gardiennes de mausolées et continuent à veiller sur les tombes de leurs saints malgré la menace islamiste.

Thumb sm
Female Ground Crews Rule Airport Tarmac
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
26 Mar 2014

34 year-old Nesrine Chkioua is a technical inspector for the DGCA (Directorate General of Civil Aviation) in France. She is one of the only three female technical inspectors in France – and the only female technical controller at the airport of Roissy-Charles de Gaulle - who can prevent an aircraft from taking off and force its passengers to exit the plane if she detects a security breach. She inspects about two aircrafts per day. When she shows up on the tarmac, station managers, pilots, and mechanics hold their breath.

Every minute of delay can cost up to 1,500 Euros to the company. But Nesrine pays no attention to the cost as she does her work: the plane must be in good standing. In 2012, 2,442 flights of foreign airline companies have been inspected. 673 of them were delayed before taking off because of security problems. Three planes needed so much maintenance that they were forbidden from taking off.

In this photo essay, we follow Nesrine and her colleague as they inspect a plane going to Lebanon. Our photographer also interviewed her about how she feel about her job and responsibilities. Technical inspectors’ working conditions are difficult, as they have to endure constant heavy noise and cold.

Thumb sm
Syrian Refugees in Turkey
By Steven Wassenaar
19 Mar 2014

On the Syrian - Turkish border near Kilis, newly arrived exhausted
refugees from Aleppo meet those who choose to go back to the war-torn
city in Syria. Because Turkey is saturated with refugees, they did not
get help, work, or a place in a refugee camp. The newly arrivals
quickly discover that Turkey can no longer host them. In cities like
Kilis and Gaziantep, unsanitary surfaces, basements and garages, are
rented to penniless refugees. After a few months in Turkey, many
refugees return to Aleppo, where at least they have a house and a family.

Newly arrived refugees, disorientated, spent their first nights in bus
stations and other public places, until they find a place to rent at
high prices from local owners. At the border, young Syrian children
work as smugglers and help for some refugees to cross the border
illegally in both directions. Those fleeing the poverty in Turkey to
return to Syria say they have lost hope in a better future. Some say
they would rather die quickly from a bomb then slowly from misery.

Thumb sm
Tin Fever in Indonesia
Bangka Island, Indonesia
By Steven Wassenaar
05 Dec 2012

Famous for its tin deposits, paradisiacal Indonesian island Bangka is destroyed by a tin rush that is the direct consequence of the success of smartphones like IPhone and tablets like Ipad. More and more tin is needed to produce these devices, and every year Indonesia extracts 110,000 tons of tin. Due to a strong demand from manufacturers (such as Samsung and Apple), thousands of Indonesians want to benefit from the high tin prices.

"The number of illegal tin mines, on land or offshore, has increased dramatically because everyone wants a piece of the pie. We believe there are about ten thousand mines today", said Uday Ratno, director of the local NGO Walhi - Friends of the Earth. Illegal tin mining is a very dangerous activity and and accidents occur frequently. According to Utay Radno,every year, between 100 and 150 miners drown in the sea, die in landslides or from diseases (cancer, malaria).
"It's a dangerous job,we know that. But I have to earn a living to support my family", Abuysaid, a miner of 57 years old. The myriads of abandoned mines form - like a war landscape - dangerous polluted mining pits filled with water. Desi's two children, Juni and Abdul, 3 and 4 years old, drowned in such an abandoned pit.

The environment is severely damaged: Bangka Island is disfigured. Mines and craters are everywhere: along roads, in the middle of the jungle, off the coast and even in the gardens in front of houses. It is as if meteors have hit the whole island. Environmental organisations are warning for the consequences, and pointing out the devastation of the landscape, the pollution of the soil, the rivers and the sea with heavy metals and the damage done to underwater wildlife and flora. The miners who work on the sea on makeshift rafts dig for tin by sucking the sand from the sea floor. Some species of fish have already disappeared. Fisherman are obliged to fish far away from the coast in the hope to catch enough fish, says Tjong Ling Siaw, leader of the fishermen on the island. Hotel owners complain about a decline in tourism because of "dirty sea water and noise pollution".

Like the illegal "blood mineral" mining in South Kivu in DR Congo, Bangka is an evidence of the indirect consequences of the commercial success of big technology players who refuse to take responsibility- through actions like mineral tracking or environmental repair and health programs - for the damage that is done to people and the environment.

This reportage is a journey to the heart of the illegal and legal tin mines in Indonesia. I shared the lives of miners who explain why they chose to do this job and sometimes put their lives at risk for a few pounds of tin.

Thumb sm
Free Syrian Army Establishes Medical...
Syria
By Steven Wassenaar
25 Jan 2014

Severely wounded, often paralyzed young Syrian opposition fighters,
are taken care of in improvised hospitals in Turkey. The Liwa Al-Tawhid, the largest
opposition brigade in Aleppo, with 12,000 members, has created its own
medical structure in Turkey. This "Al-Tawhid Liwa Medical Center"
receives wounded fighters (but also civilians) in rented apartments
and office buildings in the cities of Kilis and Gaziantep, southern
Turkey. The wounded fighters enter Turkey illegally if they still can
walk or are rushed to the Kilis hospital in ambulances for urgent
treatment.

My reportage shows the organization of the Al-Tawhid medical services and
includes a gallery of portraits of young men who fought in Syria. Many of this lost generation
will remain disabled for life, and often in many cases they are accompanied by their
families who left Syria to nurse their sons, and now have to survive
in Turkey, living in tiny apartments, without work. A former Al-Tawhid
commander, Ahmad Abu Ubaidah, 25 years, a former electrician, lost a
leg in a famous battle for the international airport. Now he works
relentlessly for the Tawhid Medical Foundation in Gaziantep and Kilis,
organizing medical aid, translators and housing for his wounded
comrades. Even with one leg he stays a commander, now active on the
front of medical help and assistance.

Media created

Thumb sm
Femen Protest 09
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
12 Jan 2015

Femen activists demonstrate next to the Saudi embassy in Paris to protest the sentence leveled last May against Saudi activist and blogger Raif Badawi, who faces 10 years in prison, a fine and 1,000 lashes after criticizing Saudi Arabia's powerful clerics on his blog. He was set to recieve half of the lashes today. Photo by Steven Wassenaar/TransTerra Media

Thumb sm
Femen Protest 10
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
12 Jan 2015

Femen activists demonstrate next to the Saudi embassy in Paris to protest the sentence leveled last May against Saudi activist and blogger Raif Badawi, who faces 10 years in prison, a fine and 1,000 lashes after criticizing Saudi Arabia's powerful clerics on his blog. He was set to recieve half of the lashes today. Photo by Steven Wassenaar/TransTerra Media

Thumb sm
Femen Protest 07
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
12 Jan 2015

Femen activists demonstrate next to the Saudi embassy in Paris to protest the sentence leveled last May against Saudi activist and blogger Raif Badawi, who faces 10 years in prison, a fine and 1,000 lashes after criticizing Saudi Arabia's powerful clerics on his blog. He was set to recieve half of the lashes today. Photo by Steven Wassenaar/TransTerra Media

Thumb sm
Femen Protest 08
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
11 Jan 2015

Femen activists demonstrate next to the Saudi embassy in Paris to protest the sentence leveled last May against Saudi activist and blogger Raif Badawi, who faces 10 years in prison, a fine and 1,000 lashes after criticizing Saudi Arabia's powerful clerics on his blog. He was set to recieve half of the lashes today. Photo by Steven Wassenaar/TransTerra Media

Thumb sm
Femen Protest 04
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
11 Jan 2015

Femen activists demonstrate next to the Saudi embassy in Paris to protest the sentence leveled last May against Saudi activist and blogger Raif Badawi, who faces 10 years in prison, a fine and 1,000 lashes after criticizing Saudi Arabia's powerful clerics on his blog. He was set to recieve half of the lashes today. Photo by Steven Wassenaar/TransTerra Media

Thumb sm
Femen Protest 05
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
11 Jan 2015

Femen activists demonstrate next to the Saudi embassy in Paris to protest the sentence leveled last May against Saudi activist and blogger Raif Badawi, who faces 10 years in prison, a fine and 1,000 lashes after criticizing Saudi Arabia's powerful clerics on his blog. He was set to recieve half of the lashes today. Photo by Steven Wassenaar/TransTerra Media

Thumb sm
Femen Protest 06
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
11 Jan 2015

Femen activists demonstrate next to the Saudi embassy in Paris to protest the sentence leveled last May against Saudi activist and blogger Raif Badawi, who faces 10 years in prison, a fine and 1,000 lashes after criticizing Saudi Arabia's powerful clerics on his blog. He was set to recieve half of the lashes today. Photo by Steven Wassenaar/TransTerra Media

Thumb sm
Femen Protest 03
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
11 Jan 2015

Femen activists demonstrate next to the Saudi embassy in Paris to protest the sentence leveled last May against Saudi activist and blogger Raif Badawi, who faces 10 years in prison, a fine and 1,000 lashes after criticizing Saudi Arabia's powerful clerics on his blog. He was set to recieve half of the lashes today. Photo by Steven Wassenaar/TransTerra Media

Thumb sm
Femen Protest 02
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
11 Jan 2015

Femen activists demonstrate next to the Saudi embassy in Paris to protest the sentence leveled last May against Saudi activist and blogger Raif Badawi, who faces 10 years in prison, a fine and 1,000 lashes after criticizing Saudi Arabia's powerful clerics on his blog. He was set to recieve half of the lashes today. Photo by Steven Wassenaar/TransTerra Media

Thumb sm
Femen Protest 01
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
12 Jan 2015

Femen activists demonstrate next to the Saudi embassy in Paris to protest the sentence leveled last May against Saudi activist and blogger Raif Badawi, who faces 10 years in prison, a fine and 1,000 lashes after criticizing Saudi Arabia's powerful clerics on his blog. He was set to recieve half of the lashes today. Photo by Steven Wassenaar/TransTerra Media

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 30
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
28 Jan 2012

Bernard "Tignous" Verlhac sketches a political cartoon in the board room of Parisian satirical paper Charlie Hebdo in 2012. He was among twelve killed when masked gunmen opened fire in the papers office on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 32
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
08 Jan 2015

An editoral meeting at Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France in 2012. Four of the artists present, Charb, Wolinski, Cabu et Tignous were killed in the terrorist attack on the satirical newspaper's offices in Paris that took twelve lives.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 29
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
28 Jan 2012

Bernard "Tignous" Verlhac (right) looks at a comic strip with Camille Besse for an upcoming issue, while Charb (left) looks on from his desk in January 2012. Carb and Tignous were among twelve members of the satirical paper killed in the attack on their office in Paris on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 31
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
08 Jan 2015

Cabu (Jean Cabut) and Charb (StŽphane Charbonnier) pictured in the editorial office of Parisian satire Charlie Hebdo in January 2012. Both were killed in the attack that took the lives of twelve of the paper's staffers on January 8. The French government quickly labelled the attack by masked gunmen an act of terror.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 28
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
28 Jan 2012

Famous French cartoonist Luz (center) was wounded in the attack that killed twelve of his colleagues, among them Stéphane "Charb" Charbonnier, (background). He is pictured here in 2012 with the police officer (left) who protects him day and night.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 26
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
28 Jan 2012

Cabu (Jean Cabut), a longtime artist at Charlie Hebdo, was one of twelve members of the satirical paper killed in the attack on their office in Paris, France. Pictured in the editorial office of Charlie Hebdo in January 2012, sketching a cartoon for an upcoming issue.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 27
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
28 Jan 2012

Charb (left) en Cabu (right) discuss a sketch for an issue of Charlie Hebdo in the magazine's Paris offices in January 2012. The two were among twelve murdered when masked gunmen opened fire in the office on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 25
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
24 Jan 2012

A wall is covered with potential front pages and drawings for an issue of Charlie Hebdo. Paris 29-01-2012.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 24
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
24 Jan 2012

Bernard Maris (left), Jean "Cabu" Cabut (center) and Stéphane "Charb" Charbonnier (left) pictured together at an editorial meeting for Charlie Hebdo in January 2012. All three were killed when masked gunmen opened fire in their offices on January 8. The French government has labeled the shooting an act of terrorism.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 22
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
24 Jan 2012

Philippe HonorŽé (2nd from left) was one of twelve artists and staffers at the Parisian satire paper Charlie Hebdo killed when masked gunmen opened fire in their offices on January 8. The French government has labeled the shooting an act of terrorism.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 23
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
24 Jan 2012

Philippe HonorŽé (2nd from left) and Bernard "Tignous" Verlhac (right) were among twelve artists and staffers at the Parisian satire paper Charlie Hebdo killed when masked gunmen opened fire in their offices on January 8. The French government has labeled the shooting an act of terrorism.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 21
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
24 Jan 2012

StŽphane "Charb" Charbonnier (right) and "Luz" in the offices of Charlie Hebdo in 2012. "Charb" was among the twelve murdered, and "Luz" was seriously injured when masked gunmen targeted the offices of the Parisian satire paper Charlie Hebdo on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 20
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2012

Cabu (Jean Cabut, right), a longtime artist at Charlie Hebdo, was one of twelve members of the satirical paper killed in the attack on their office in Paris, France. Pictured in the editorial office of Charlie Hebdo in January 2012, during a staff meeting for an upcoming issue.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 19
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2012

Cabu (Jean Cabut, right), a longtime artist at Charlie Hebdo, was one of twelve members of the satirical paper killed in the attack on their office in Paris, France. Pictured in the editorial office of Charlie Hebdo in January 2012, during a staff meeting for an upcoming issue.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 17
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2012

StŽphane "Charb" Charbonnier was among the twelve murdered when masked gunmen targeted the offices of the Parisian satire paper Charlie Hebdo on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 18
Paris
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2012

StŽphane "Charb" Charbonnier draws a political cartoon in the offices of Charlie Hebdo in 2012. He was among the twelve murdered when masked gunmen targeted the offices of the Parisian satire paper Charlie Hebdo on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 15
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
18 Jan 2012

A wall is covered with potential front pages and drawings for the next issue of Charlie Hebdo. Paris 29-01-2012

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 16
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
18 Jan 2012

Philippe HonorŽ (2nd from right) was one of twelve artists and staffers at the Parisian satire paper Charlie Hebdo killed when masked gunmen opened fire in their offices on January 8. The French government has labeled the shooting an act of terrorism.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 14
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
18 Jan 2012

A wall is covered with potential front pages and drawings for an issue of Charlie Hebdo. Paris 29-01-2012

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 13
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
18 Jan 2012

Charbonnier was among the twelve murdered when masked gunmen targeted the offices of the Parisian satire paper Charlie Hebdo on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 12
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2012

Riss Tignous sketches a political cartoon in the board room of Parisian satirical paper Charlie Hebdo in 2012. He was among twelve killed when masked gunmen opened fire in the papers office on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 10
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2012

Famous French cartoonist Luz (right) was wounded in the attack that killed twelve of his colleagues. He is pictured here in 2012 with the police officer (left) who protects him day and night.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 11
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2012

Charb is pictured smashing a screen with former president Nicolas Sarkozy on it, during the 2012 French elections. He was among the twelve murdered when masked gunmen targeted the offices of the Parisian satire paper Charlie Hebdo on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 09
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2012

Cabu (Jean Cabut) and Charb (StŽphane Charbonnier) pictured in the editorial office of Parisian satire Charlie Hebdo in January 2012. Both were killed in the attack that took the lives of twelve of the paper's staffers on January 8. The French government quickly labelled the attack by masked gunmen an act of terror.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 08
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2012

Riss Tignous sketches a political cartoon in the board room of Parisian satirical paper Charlie Hebdo in 2012. He was among twelve killed when masked gunmen opened fire in the papers office on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 06
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
18 Jan 2012

Bernard Maris (2nd from right) sketches during an editorial meeting in Paris in January 2012. He was among the twelve staff members of the Parisian satirical paper Charlie Hebdo killed when masked gunman opened fire in their office on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 07
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2012

Riss Tignous looks over a colleagues drawing in the board room of Parisian satirical paper Charlie Hebdo in 2012. He was among twelve killed when masked gunmen opened fire in the papers office on January 8.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 05
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
18 Jan 2012

Bernard Maris (left), Cabu (2nd from left) and Charb (StŽphane Charbonnier, 3rd from left) were all murdered when masked gunmen opened fire in the offices of satirical magazine Chalie Hebdo in Paris, in what the French government quickly labeled an act of terrorism.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 04
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
18 Jan 2012

An editoral meeting at Charlie Hebdo in Paris, France in 2012. Four of the artists present, Charb, Wolinski, Cabu et Tignous were killed in the terrorist attack on the satirical newspaper's offices in Paris that took twelve lives.

Thumb sm
Charlie hebdo 03
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
16 Jan 2012

Cabu (Jean Cabut), a longtime artist at Charlie Hebdo, was one of twelve members of the satirical paper killed in the attack on their office in Paris, France. Pictured in the editorial office of Charlie Hebdo in January 2012, sketching a cartoon for an upcoming issue.