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Transterra Media Editor is the production unit responsible for original, commissioned content for brands and publishers.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story
Kafranbel
By Transterra Editor
30 Apr 2015

Majd Bayoush is a 22-year-old who fled his hometown of Kafranbel in north Syria with the aim of smuggling himself into Europe. After a perilous and complicated journey that lasted for nearly three months, he reached Germany, where he is waiting for the final procedures before he is granted political asylum.

The following is his story as told to Transterra Media.

I arrived to the port city of Izmir, Turkey on September 22, 2014. On the same day, I took an inflatable boat with 47 other migrants and sailed to the Greek island of Samos. We reached our destination after 2.5 hours. The boat deflated and sank after it hit the rocky shore.   

We had agreed with the smuggler Abu Abdu, a Syrian man nicknamed ‘the Tiger’, to surrender to the Greek police once we reach the island. Before leaving Turkey, I deposited 8,000 euros at a money transfer office called ‘al-Saeed’ controlled by the smuggling gang.  [This transfer company has offices in other countries.] Abu Abdu took 2,500 euros out of that sum.

We climbed a mountain on the island of Samos and reached a police station, where policemen confiscated all our possessions, including our mobile phones, and detained us for three days. On Sept. 25, the police authorities placed us below the deck in a cruise boat, which headed to an island near Samos. I do not know its name. There was a camp that held other captured illegal migrants who were Afghans, Asians and Palestinians. However, most of them were Syrians. 

FULL TEXT IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Yezidis Demand Return of Loved Ones H...
Dohuk
By Transterra Editor
15 Apr 2015

Kurdish Yezidi refugees in the Sharya camp near Dohuk in Iraqi Kurdistan took part in protest against the continued detention of their community members by ISIS. The protest was part of a campaign launched by the Yezidi Lalesh Cultural Center and other organizations started. These protests coincided with the Yezidi New Year, also known as "Holy Wednesday", which is celebrated on the first Wednesday of April. Thousands of colored balloons carrying written heart-felt messages were released during the sit-in. The refugees wrote “My wish is to celebrate the holiday with my mother,” and “Our holiday is your return” among other slogans.

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Yezidis Demand Return of Loved Ones H...
Dohuk
By Transterra Editor
15 Apr 2015

Kurdish Yezidi refugees in the Sharya camp near Dohuk in Iraqi Kurdistan took part in protest against the continued detention of their community members by ISIS. The protest was part of a campaign launched by the Yezidi Lalesh Cultural Center and other organizations started. These protests coincided with the Yezidi New Year, also known as "Holy Wednesday", which is celebrated on the first Wednesday of April. Thousands of colored balloons carrying written heart-felt messages were released during the sit-in. The refugees wrote “My wish is to celebrate the holiday with my mother,” and “Our holiday is your return” among other slogans.

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Story Kit: Yemenis Suffer Amid the Chaos
Yemen
By Transterra Editor
14 Apr 2015

The escalating conflict in Yemen is taking its toll on the civilian population. The Houthi takeover began with civil demonstrations against the rise in oil prices, but for the citizens of one of the most deprived countries in the world, since the fall of President Hadi’s government, living conditions have become even worse. The Houthis, not satisfied with taking control over the nation’s capital Sanaa, swept south, extending their area of influence and seizing weapons from abandoned military bases on their way. Once they began an assault on Yemen’s largest port Aden, the elected President Hadi was forced to flee the country. His government asked the neighboring Arab countries for assistance. Labeling the Houthi coup as an Iranian conspiracy, the Saudis formed a coalition with several other countries in the Middle East and began a bombing campaign across Yemen in an attempt to destroy the Houthis. As coalition air strikes ravaged the country, some communities came out in support of the Houthis while condemning the foreign intervention. Now that the situation has turned into an international conflict it is easy to forget the Yemeni citizens who find themselves trapped in their own country. Not only have many civilian homes been destroyed in the cities of Sanaa, Aden, Hodeida and many other locations across the country, but the prices of basic necessities is increasing exorbitantly, out of the grasp of many in a country where 50% of the population were living below the poverty line before this conflict even started. Instead of going to school, some children have been forced to roam the streets barefoot looking for propane gas or food to take home. There are enormous queues outside gas stations and shops selling grain, but the people waiting are not guaranteed to purchase the goods that they desperately need.

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Leaked Footage from ISIS Defector
Deir Ez Zour
By Transterra Editor
06 Jan 2015

This video collection offers a unique and unauthorized glimpse into the activities of ISIS in Syria. It features meetings led by a high-ranking official of ISIS who attempts to convince clan leaders in a Syrian village to pledge allegiance to the Islamic State. The video also includes scenes of ISIS fighters in military situations and relaxing.

NOTE: The video clips in this collection were obtained by Transterra Media from a source who received it from a member of ISIS who defected from the group. According to the source the videos were recorded in the town of Zir and other locations in Syria between January and June, 2014. Transterra Media cannot independently verify the accuracy of this content. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media (TTM) website does not in any way constitute endorsement by TTM of any claims or statements made in the video.

Defying ISIS- Beirut's Shia Commemora...
Beirut
By Transterra Editor
04 Nov 2014

November 4, 2014
Beirut, Lebanon

Amidst tight security, Lebanese Shia citizens defy ISIS bomb threats and participate in Ashura celebrations in Beirut's southern suburbs.

Ashura commemorates the martyrdom of Imam Hussein in the battle of Karbala in 680AD. While primarily a religious celebration, Ashura in Lebanon is highly tied to politics. This year's rally in south Beirut ended with a speech by Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah, who defended his party's military actions in Syria.

Sunni militant groups like ISIS and Nusra Front have been threatening to attack Hezbollah controlled and Shia dominant areas in Lebanon in revenge for Hezbollah's involvement in the Syrian conflict. Last year, Beirut's southern suburbs experienced a wave bombings at the hands of Nusra affiliated militants.

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The Streets of Raqqa
Raqqa
By Transterra Editor
25 Oct 2014

October 25, 2014
Raqqa, Syria

As the US-led airstrikes against the Islamic State group continue, life goes on in the IS capital of Raqqa. Evidence of IS governance abound on things like billboards, which remind women to cover their faces, and fighters acting as traffic police. Shops go about business as usual, trading in US Dollars and Syrian Pounds, but also facing the challenge of import restrictions.

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ISIL in Syria
Syria
By Transterra Editor
25 Jul 2014

Since establishing a foothold in the Syrian city of Raqqa in mid-2013, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) has grown to become one of the most powerful Islamist militant groups in history. ISIL has now established a self-declared Caliphate that they have named the "Islamic State", which stretches from their areas of control on the outskirts of Aleppo, across Eastern Syria and Western Iraq, to the outskirts of Baghdad. This collection of footage was shot in ISIL controlled areas of Syria and offers an inside look at life under in the Islamic State.

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"Free" Syrian Football Team
By Transterra Editor
19 Jul 2014

June, 2014
Tripoli, Lebanon

As the war in Syria drags on, some Syrian defectors and refugees are choosing to fight with a football. Training in northern Lebanon, team members watched the 2014 World Cup games and were inspired - and now, they are determined to become the new representatives for a free Syrian national team. They are fervent in their Ramadan prayers by day and train with passion at night. We gain rare access to their world, how they live, and just how they hope to rise above the turmoil in their country through sport.

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Documentary Films
By Transterra Editor
25 Jun 2014

Collection of the Transterra Media documentaries.

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Iraqi Shia Tribe Prepares for Battle ...
Baghdad
By Transterra Editor
13 Jun 2014

June 11, 2014,
Baghdad, Iraq

A Shia tribe in the al-Kazemeya neighborhood of northern Baghdad recruits dozens of new men to fight ISIL.

Members of the Al-Anbari tribe gathered on Wednesday, June, 11, 2014 in the orchard of Sheikh Mabdar al-Marhoun, the Sheikh of the Anbari tribe in al-Kazemeya. The volunteers responded to a call by Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki that citizens volunteer to fight the ISIL onslaught.

There are reports that a number of tribes in the southern provinces of Nasriya, Maysan, and Karbala have already started preparing fighting groups to be sent to fight ISIL further north.

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Beirut Women's Marathon
By Transterra Editor
03 May 2014

May 4, 2014

Beirut, Lebanon

Women Run for Rights, Beirut Lebanon

"Run Forward, Enough Going Backwards" is the title of the women's marathon held on Sunday May 4, 2014, in downtown Beirut.

The event was organized by the Beirut Marathon Association (BMA), and sponsored by Lebanon's first Lady Wafaa Sleiman.

The 5 kilometer race started at 9:00 am.

Around 8000 multinational runners participated in 2 races. A 10KM race for women and special needs of ages 14+, and a 5KM race "Run For Causes" open to men, women and special needs of all ages.

According to BMA, the event planners, the idea was born out of the "Power of Sports" and the belief that the values of sports should be spread to all in order to activate a positive change in our world. The main goal of the race is Empowering Women through running.

The event ended at 11:00 am with the distribution medals for winners of all categories.

This was the second running of the women's race which was launched last year.

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Barrel Bombing of al-Halk Neighborhoo...
Aleppo, Syria
By Transterra Editor
02 May 2014

May 1, 2014

Aleppo, Syria

Unconfirmed reports say from 33 to more than 50 people were killed after a barrel bomb was dropped from a Syrian Army helicopter on the al-Halk neighborhood of Aleppo on Thursday, May 1st.
Among the missing are said to be members of three families.
The al-Halk neighborhood is located near Syrian Army military bases and has never been bombed before by helicopters since the barrel bombing campaign started in Aleppo.

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Airstrike on Aleppo Elementary School
By Transterra Editor
30 Apr 2014

April 30, 2014

Aleppo, Syria

According to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights as many as 27 people including a number of children have been killed in an air strike on a school in Aleppo, Syria.
The attack today hit the Ein Jalout elementary school in an eastern neighborhood of the city held by Syrian opposition forces. It came during morning classes at the school.

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Indian Election - Bijnor, Uttar Prade...
By Transterra Editor
22 Apr 2014

A report on the ongoing election in India from the city of Bijnor in the State of Uttar Pradesh.
In Spanish language
Reporter: Ana Gabriella
TRT 2:08
Includes Video w/ interviews
Reporter P2C (Spanish) Narration (Spanish)

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Syrian Army Advancing in Homs
Syria, Homs
By Transterra Editor
19 Apr 2014

Photos taken on April 19, 2014 in Wadi al Sayeh, Homs.

Shows damaged buildings, army vehicles and soldiers in Wadi al Sayeh, the last neighborhood before entering the old city of Homs which is held by Syrian rebels.

Syrian state television claims success by the Syrian Army and the National Defense Force militias in entering the Old City of Homs.
However opposition activists say government forces were able to force the rebels out of "Wadi al Sayeh" neighborhood but were unable to take control of the area and enter the old city.

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DRC: Goma's Choristers
The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Goma
By Transterra Editor
11 Apr 2014

Goma, the regional capital of the volatile North Kivu province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) , prepares for Easter. While the Congolese army is still fighting dozens of rebel groups in the region with the support of the UN, the city is still recovering from its recent occupation by the now defeated M-23 rebels.

As part of the run up to Easter, the Seraphin Choir prepares for Palm Sunday, a day that symbolizes the arrival of Jesus Christ in Jerusalem. Palm Sunday will mark the beginning of the Holy Week, and it is an opportunity for the choir to perform in front of hundreds of people at Goma ́s Saint Joseph cathedral.

For over two weeks, they have rehearsed almost every day to prepare for one of the most important days in the Christian calendar.

Easter is a time of joy for a population that has suffered for so many years. Seraphin choir's members have found singing as away, not only to embody their faith, but also as a way to find of peace and discipline. Their rehearsals can go up to 4 hours every day and attention to detail is mandatory.

Paterne Bandeke, Seraphin ́s director and choirmaster since its creation in 2006, supervises every section with an inquisitive ear. He detects every flaw that would go unnoticed for the average listener. Discipline, passion and hard work have paid off, allowing their members to express their faith in a beautiful way in front of hundreds of people during open-air masses.

From 1996 until 2002, DRC was a battlefield for several neighboring countries - including Rwanda, Uganda, Zimbawe and Angola - who fought over security concerns while plundering the country of its precious resources.

When the M-23 rebels took over Goma in November 2011, Seraphin ́s Choir had to split. Those who could afford to flee ran away south to nearby Bukavu, or to the neighboring Rwanda. The others had no choice but to stay.

Paterne saw Congolese Army soldiers drop their weapons in front of his doorstep and run away while M-23 rebels took Goma.

Dominique Briego, the sound technician, could not flee because he was suffering from an injury acquired in a biking accident. During his recovery, choristers often came to support him and make sure he was fine.

André Buke, the organist, lost his faith during the M-23 rebellion and blamed God for what was happening. However he rediscovered his faith when he escaped bomb
shelling in two separate occasions. The choir taught him to forgive and be thankful.

The defeat of M-23 and a new leadership in the Congolese army have given people hope. While a comprehensive peace in North Kivu is still elusive, Goma ́s choristers will celebrate Easter like always: with pride and joy.

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Lebanon in the Shadow of the Syrian C...
Lebanon,
By Transterra Editor
15 Apr 2014

Lebanon is being dragged into the abyss of the Syrian war and is now seeing more strife than ever since the war began three years ago. The civil war in Syrian has deeply divided Lebanese politicians and citizens. Armed clashes between supporters of Syrian President Bashar al Assad and those supporting the rebellion have erupted in different regions of the country. In the northern city of Tripoli for example, clashes opposing supporters and opponents to the Syrian regime in rivaling neighborhoods of Bab el Tabbeneh and Jabal Mohsen have left scores dead.

Hezbollah, the Lebanese Shia militant group and political party, has been openly fighting alongside with Bashar el Assad's troops, raising sectarian tensions inside Lebanon and provoking some Sunni hardliners, most of whom support the Syrian rebels. Hezbollah's stronghold in Beirut was hit by several suicide bombings in the past year as a retaliation for its involvement in Syria. As for the Bekaa Valley, rocket fire has repeatedly hit Sunni, Christian, and Shia towns located on the border with Syria.

In addition to the deterioration of the security situation and growing tensions between religious communities, Lebanon is now hosting over 1 million Syrian refugees. Most of them live in poverty and depend on aid to survive. They need everything from shelter to food, education and health services.

The influx has also put pressure on education and health systems, as well as natural resources. Wages have fallen throughout the country as Syrian workers willing to accept low pays have flooded the market. As a result of these political tensions and security threats, National elections due to be held in June 2013 have been postponed until fall 2014.

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Yanukovych's Extravagant Private Mans...
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

The extravagant and luxurious country estate of Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych has been thrown open to the public after the Ukrainian government seized it last February. Thousands of curious Ukrainians flocked to see the opulent mansion of Mezhyhirya which has become the symbol of Ukrainian corruption in high places.

Yanukovych’s former property of 137 hectares property – Monaco occupies 195 hectares - on the banks of the river Dnieper in Mezhyhirya included luxurious facilities such as a private zoo, an eighteen-hole golf course, a horse riding club with an indoor exercise space, an underground shooting range, a garage complex for his collection of 70 cars and a helicopter pad and hangar.

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Father France Van Der Lugt Grave
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

Pictures shot on April 9, 2014, of the grave of the Dutch Priest Father Frans Van Der Lugt, in the Jesuit Monastery in the old city of Homs.
Father Frans was assassinated on Monday, April 7, when an unknown masked gunman shot him in the head in the monastery according to Mazhar, one of the monastery inhabitants who witnessed the assassination
Father Frans Van Der Lugt refused to leave Homs during the February evacuation and stayed with the remaining Christian inhabitants.

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Kasab, Syria held by opposition forces
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

Photos taken on April 4, 2014, in the Armenian Christian town of Kasab after rebel fighters seized it on March 24, 2014. Photos show aftermath of fighting.

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Rebel Fighters Go for a Swim After Ta...
By Transterra Editor
01 Apr 2014

Rebel fighters go for a swim on Samra beach after Syrian rebels seized control of the tourist site by the Turkish border. Rebels also took control of the Armenian Christian town of Kasab and the last regime held Syria-Turkey border crossing.

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Father Frans Assassination in Homs, S...
By Transterra Editor
06 Apr 2014

Jesuit Monastery, Besieged Homs
07/04/2014
Father Francis Vanederlcht was shot in the head by a masked gunman who broke into the Jesuit Monastery in Homs' rebel held area of Boustan al-Diwan on April 7, 2014, killing him instantly.
The monastery's inhabitants shrouded Vanederlcht's body and buried him in the monastery soon after the incident.
Father Francis Vanederlcht refused to leave Homs during the February evacuation and stayed with the remaining christian inhabitants.

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Father Frans Footage and Assasination...
By Transterra Editor
06 Apr 2014

Jesuit Monastery, Besieged Homs
07/04/2014
Father Francis Vanederlcht was shot in the head by a masked gunman who broke into the Jesuit Monastery in Homs' rebel held area of Boustan al-Diwan on April 7, 2014, killing him instantly.
The monastery's inhabitants shrouded Vanederlcht's body and buried him in the monastery soon after the incident.
Father Francis Vanederlcht refused to leave Homs during the February evacuation and stayed with the remaining christian inhabitants.
Gunman kills Father Francis Vanederlcht in Jesuit Monastary in Homs' Boustan al-Diwan.

More Photos Here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/2047

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Innovation Flourishes While Syria at War
By Transterra Editor
28 Mar 2014

The cost of Syria's civil war is high, with the human cost well over 100,000. Along with conflict comes the inevitable loss of necessities, such as water, electricity and communication. In this video collection, there are four different videos that show the innovative way people are dealing with this lack of necessities, from the building of a manual water pump to homemade cell phone antennas.

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Libyan Freedom Riders
By Transterra Editor
24 Mar 2014

Motorcycles, like many other sports or activities considered “savage” or a threat to the Libyan culture, were banned during the Gadhafi area in Libya. But since Gadhafi's regime fell in 2011, motorcycles are making their comeback in the streets of Libya. Fakhri Al-Hassi is one of the first motorcycle riders in the country. He used to ride his bike in the streets of Benghazi during Gadhafi’s rule, but was often arrested and harassed by the police for wearing leather clothes and badges which they said promoted imperialist ideas. Fakhri Al-Hassi, also called “GO Fakhri”, founded the Berynatchi Club in February 2013, through which he now organizes weekly rides with other riders and maintenance workshops. Fakhri’s goal is to improve the image of the biking culture with the Libyan people and the police. Since the revolution, the number of motorcycles in the country exploded and with it the number of road traffic accidents. The biker says it is important that the club is registered with the Libyans authorities and that all the bikers who join it have driving licenses to gain the trust and respect of the Libyan authorities. The club, which is one of the only two bikers club in Eastern Libya and was named after the ancient name of the city, now counts 55 members. For Fakhri, clubs like his are a good example to show that the revolution was not only political, but affected all parts Libyan society.

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Fishermen Protest the Destruction of ...
Beirut
By Transterra Editor
19 Mar 2014

The story of AlDaliah, which is the area separating Al roche and Alramle Albayda, goes way back to the year of 1995, when the deceased prime minister Rafik Al Hariri started to buy all the properties in the area from their fishermen owners through private realestate companies.
Years after that this issue had floated to the surface again when the heirs of Rafik Al Hariri demanded to close the case and kick out the inhabitants of the area that they own, and the government has to build ports to contain the boats of the fishermen.
However, working on this project stopped when the heirs of Rafik Al Hariri didn’t agree on expanding the fishermen’s port because it’ll be taking over their personal property according to the declaration of the former minister of public work and transportation Ghazi Al Aridi.
This case lies between the hands of the Lebanese justice system which has not made a decision till this day, with the fishermen threatening to make their protest more violent in case they were forced out of their houses.

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Ukraine's Standoff with Russia
Crimea, Ukraine
By Transterra Editor
05 Mar 2014

Ukraine continues to standoff with Russia in Simferopol, Crimea. The photos range from the streets of Simferopol to the Ukrainian military base in Perevalnoye.

Heavily armed anonymous soldiers stand guard at the Coast Guard Headquarter on Karl Marx Street in Simferopol, Crimea, while alleged Russian soldiers in full body armor, armed with an assault rifles marched away from the besieged Ukrainian Military Base in Perevalnoye, close to Simferopol, Crimea. Members of the 10th Squadron of the self-proclaimed Pro Russian Militia could also be seen standing guard in front of the Coast Guard Headquarter on Karl Marx Street in Simferopol with the Russian flag waving in the back. Alleged Russian military vehicles are parked next to the besieged Ukrainian Military Base in Perevalnoye, where alleged Russian soldiers stand guard.

Photos By: Daniel van Moll

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Occupied Presidential Palace in Ukraine
Kiev, Ukraine
By Transterra Editor
02 Mar 2014

For several days, the grounds of the presidential palace are open, but only the journalists can enter into palace itself.

Hundreds of both Ukrainians and journalists came to the presidential palace of Viktor Yanukovich after he left the city. His lavish residence is 10 miles from the capital of Ukraine, Hundreds of both Ukrainians and journalists came to the presidential palace of Viktor Yanukovich after he left the city. His lavish residence is 10 miles from the capital of Ukraine.

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Rocket Attack in Government Held area...
Homs, Syria
By Transterra Editor
26 Feb 2014

Rocket Shelling on residential neighborhoods in the government controlled areas of Homs Date: 27/2/2014 Location of Shooting: Akrama Neighborhood in the city of Homs 6 people killed and 24 injured after being hit by “Grad” rockets in the Akrama neighborhoods of Homs, which lies under the control of the Syrian government. Local source in the city said 8 people were killed and at least 21 injured by a Grad rocket on Akrama Neighborhood in the city of Homs and three other people were injured by another Grad rocket that hit a house in the Alkhodari street in the neighborhood of Wadi al Dahab, Homs. The government has accused Syrian opposition militants of firing the rockets on the neighborhoods controlled by the government.

قذائف صاروخية تستهدف أحياء سكنية في مناطق تخضع لسيطرة النظام في مدينة حمص تاريخ الإنتاج: 27/2/2014 موقع التصوير: حي عكرمة مدينة حمص قتل 6 أشخاص وأصيب 24 بجروح جراء سقوط قذائف صاروخية في أحياء حمص التي تقع تحت سيطرة الحكومة السورية. مصادر محلية أعلنت أن 8 أشخاص قتلوا على الأقل وصيب 21 بجروح جراء سقوط صاروخ من نوع "غراد" على حي عكرمة في مدينة حمص ، كما أصيب 3 أشخاص بجروح بسبب سقوط صاروخ من نوع "غراد" على أحد المنازل في شارع الخضري بحي وادي الدهب . وأضاف المصادر ان الصاروخ الذي وقع في حي عكرمة ادى الى احتراق 8 سيارات والحاق اضرار مادية كبيرة بالمنازل والمحال التجارية .. واتهمت الحكومة السورية مسلحي المعارضة بإطلاق الصواريخ على الأحياء التي تقع تحت سيطرة النظام ..

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2 Video

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Syrian-Kurdish Women's YPJ Militia
Afrin, Syria
By Transterra Editor
02 Dec 2013

Hundreds of Syrian Kurdish women are joining the female’s section of the People’s Protection Units (YPJ) because they see in the jihadist advance, a serious threat to their rights. Human Rights Watch reports that women suffer severe discrimination in Al-Nusra Front and ISIS controlled areas.

"The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant sees the woman as a weak being and something purely decorative. Only uses her for sex,” explains Farida Abdo from Afrin police station with a steaming cup of tea in her hand. "Women have skills and the best way to prove it is fighting the jihadists to make them feel lower,” highlights this police officer.

Afrin is a predominantly Kurdish region of northwest Aleppo province and is located 60 kilometres north of the second Syrian largest city.

Since the Syrian conflict began in March 2011, Kurdish women are pursuing a double struggle for the rights recognition of the biggest minority in the country (10% of the Syrian population) and claim the role of women in a distinctly patriarchal Middle East. Following the thesis of Abdullah Öcalan, the Democratic Union Party (PYD), the dominant party among the Kurds of Syria, which has an ideology akin to the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), promotes active women participation in the military-political sphere and co-leadership in the different social organisms.

"We must leave the domestic sphere and take an active role in the democratic autonomy of the Syrian Kurdistan. It is an historical moment and the woman should take part in it,” says Rokan Ahmad, a high rank PYD officer in Afrin. The other big Rokan’s concern is “the serious threat that supposes the jihadist advance in Syrian areas under rebel control”. Since last June, Al Qaeda linked groups and some rebel factions are fighting the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) to gain control of the Kurdish areas in northern Syria.

Discrimination against women
According to "http://www.hrw.org/news/2014/01/13/syria-extremists-restricting-women-s-rightshttp://www.hrw.org/news/2014/01/13/syria-extremists-restricting-women-s-rights" Human Rights Watch (HRW) report published in early January, the Al-Nusra Front and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) are imposing "strict and discriminatory rules for women" in areas under their control. The Sharia, the Islamic strict law imposed by these jihadist groups, forces women to wear the niqab, a veil covering all of the face apart from the eyes. The restrictions also forbade women from wearing jeans, tight-fitting clothing, skirts or dresses above the ankle and make-up. In some areas, the groups ordered women not to style their hair or visit hair salons.

HRW claims that the restrictions of these jihadist groups affect women daily lives by limiting their ability to receive an education and support their families. The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, based in London and with dozens of activists on the ground, confirms "cases of women arrests for political reasons, being a member of civil society organizations or supporting demonstrations in the streets.”

"These extremist fighters practice Jihad al-Nikah (sexual jihad) that allows them to have and enjoy sex during the battle," Rokan alerts. Witnesses from areas controlled by the ISIS report cases of women abductions and rapes to satisfy emir’s sexual desires. Akhin, the chief commander of Kurdish female police in Afrin, tells how the Al-Nusra Front stopped her for eight hours at a checkpoint while she was returning from Damascus. "They did not touch me because I was fully covered. If they know who I am, they would have killed me right there," recalls this young experienced PKK fighter recently returned from Qandil Mountains.

On the frontline
The jihadist offensive over the predominantly Kurdish region of northern Syria has caused a large mobilization among the population and many women have joined the police and the People´s Protection Units (YPG). Since March 2013, both bodies have their own women's section with a high autonomy from the central structure. "Much of our work is done jointly with men. We act independently when it is necessary to investigate cases where women are involved,” says Akhin. Now the female share of the military structure is around 35% but commanders point that the goal is to achieve nearly 50 %.

In Basufane’s frontline, it is possible to realize the large number of women that have recently joined the female section of the Kurdish militia (YPJ). There, dozens of women take cover in trenches and bunkers that are only 300 meters way from ISIS positions. "Our enemy wants to impose servitude of women. Because we refuse this idea we are fighting them," declares Sakine, while she is cleaning her AK- 47. Like her, hundreds of young girls near twenties, have joined YPJ leaving their studies and works, and spend long periods of time on the frontline without visiting their families.

"ISIS militants fear us even more than men because according to their beliefs if they die during the fight killed by a woman they do not reach the paradise," explains Zilan from her guarding post. This is a version that Abdullrahman, a member of the Kurdish negotiating committee that sometimes held meetings with the jihadists to exchange bodies, prisoners and manage truces, ratifies. "The emirs of ISIS beg us to remove women from the frontline because is a dishonour be killed in their hands", says Abdullrahman.

Precisely, Roksen died in Basufane last September in heavy fighting with the ISIS while covering the withdrawal of its comrades. Abdullrahman, who recovered her body, says it was completely unrecognizable. "Roksen was immolated with a grenade before being detained. After that, the extremists threw his body to the dogs and it was totally disfigured”, complains the member of the negotiating delegation.

For Badiaa Waqqas, Roksen's mother, “my daughter’s blood has contributed to achieve a Kurdish autonomy in Syria. I am sad because she died before this desire comes true."

David Meseguer. Afrin (Syria)

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Disabled Evacuated From Homs
Homs, Syria
By Transterra Editor
14 Feb 2014

These are young men and opposition militants from the neighborhoods of old Homs after they were evacuated due to the agreement between the United Nations and the Syrian government. They are injured as a result of the clashes, as well as shelling and bombing by government forces, that left them permanently disabled. Some of them have lost limbs and are in critical condition.

The United Nations and the Syrian Red Crescent supervise their treatment in a school in the neighborhood of Al-Andalus, Dablan ,that is used as a shelter for the displaced from the old neighborhoods of Homs, after they get security clearance by the authorities.

مجموعة من الصور للشباب والرجال من مسلحي المعارضة من مسلحي أحياء حمص القديمة بعد الاتفاق بين الأمم المتحدة والحكومة السورية على خروجهم وهم مصابين نتيجة المعارك مع القوات الحكومية السورية والقصف المدفعي والطيران، على تلك الأحياء قصفا واشتباكات تسببت لهم بإعاقات دائمة والبعض منهم فقد طرفيه او احد أطرافه .. تقوم الأمم المتحدة والهلال الاحمر السوري بالأشراف على علاجهم في مدرسة الأندلس في حي الدبلان التي اتخذت كمركز إيواء للنازحين من أحياء حمص القديمة .. بعد تسوية أوضاعهم الأمنية من قبل السلطات السورية .. الصور بتاريخ

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Syrian Red Crescent in Homs
By Transterra Editor
12 Feb 2014

The Syrian Red Crescent transporting evacuees out of the city to get medical treatment and tests, as well as transporting food and medical aid into the besieged Old City of Homs.

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Aleppo Barrel Bombs Attack
By Transterra Editor
30 Jan 2013

On both January 26 and January 31, 2014, Syrian military helicopters dropped barrel bombs on rebel-held areas of Aleppo in the neighborhood of Mysar, near the Aleppo airport.

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Port Said Massacre
Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
06 May 2013

Tears in the eyes, rocks on the ground, and blood on the pavements - as injustice prevails.

On the 1st of February 2012, Port Said stadium witnessed the biggest catastrophe in Egypt's recent history, in a match between Cairo's al-Ahly club and Port Said's al-Masry club. Under the auspices of the police, 72 football fans from al-Ahly's biggest fanclub 'Ultras Ahlawi' were slaughtered in the stadium that day by paid thugs and football fans from Port Said city.

Contrary to protocol, police did not search al-Masry fans, who wielded knives, swords, stones, and fireworks. As clashes broke out towards the end of the match, police forces did not intervene. Instead, they withdrew from the stadium, welded the doors, and turned off the stadium lights. In the meantime, Ultras Ahlawy were being chased, stabbed, choked, and thrown off grandstands.

"It was a nightmare. I had to cover myself with my friend's blood to escape the thugs who were chasing me," said Ahmad Sabry, who witnessed the death of his childhood friend.

Most of the fans killed in the stadium were between the age of thirteen and twenty. The massacre took place within a twenty-minute frenzy.

This massacre happened against the backdrop of an ongoing vendetta between the police and Ultras Ahlawy, that has manifested itself in repeated clashes since the group's inception in 2007. Many believe that the police orchestrated this massacre to retaliate for the humiliation suffered a the hands of the Ultras, who fiercly fought off the police during the 2011 Egyptian revolution.

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Liberated Malakal in South Sudan
South Sudan
By Transterra Editor
22 Jan 2014

In recently liberated Malakal, hospitals, schools and churches have been transformed into refugee camps – housing the displaced, but struggling to provide for the huge number of those seeking safety. Army spokesman Philip Aguer said on Monday that the rebels "were flushed out of the town" and Malakal was "finally in the hands" of South Sudanese troops again. This photo essay follows the troops on a trip to Malakal with the Minister of Defense. Photos by Emre Rende

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Suicide Bombing in Hezbollah Area in ...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
21 Jan 2014

On Tuesday, January 21, four people were killed when a suicide bomber detonated himself in the Haret Hreik area, a Hezbollah stronghold, in the southern suburbs of Beirut. The Syrian opposition group, Jabhat al-Nusra, claimed responsibility for the attack. This was the second bombing in the area since the beginning of 2014.

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South Sudan Refugees Flee Violence to...
Adjuman district, Uganda
By Transterra Editor
20 Jan 2014

Hundreds of refugees are fleeing the violence in South Sudan by crossing through the Nimule border to Uganda, to join thousands who are still in transit centres like the Dzaipi one. Most of these Sudanese civilians come from the Bor region of South Sudan, which was recently retaken by the South Sudanese Army from rebel forces.

Nearly 50,000 people have fled South Sudan into neighboring Uganda since the deadly conflict erupted. Here at Dzaipi, there is severe overcrowding at the center that was originally build to hold 400 refugees, but now holds over 20,000. Included in the video are interviews with refugees, as well as a UNHCR officer, who speaks about the agency's obstacles in providing for this massive influx of people.

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Zaatari
Zaatari, Jordan
By Transterra Editor
05 Jun 2013

Zaatari camp shelters more than 120 000 Syrian refugees. The families pile up in tents and "caravans" and survive thanks to international aid. Sickness spreads, water is scarce as the temperature rises up to 40 degrees during the day. To the daily difficulties add up psychological disorder and traumas.

Le camp de Zaatari accueille plus de 120 000 réfugiés syriens. Les familles s'entassent dans des tentes et des « caravanes », et survivent grâce à l'aide internationale. Les maladies se propagent, l'eau se fait de plus en plus rare alors que les températures atteignent 40 degrés dans la journée. Et à la dureté des conditions de vie s'ajoutent les traumatismes et l'épuisement psychologique.

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Iraqi Christians in the Middle East
Iraq
By Transterra Editor
28 Nov 2012

The Iraqi Christians are one of the oldest Christian communities of the Middle East. Chaldean Catholic Church is the most representative group, including three-quarters of all Iraqi Christians, followed by the Syro-Catholic, Armenian Catholic, Greek- catholic and Latin communities. After the 2003 invasion of Iraq by Angloamerican armies, violence against Christians rose, with reports of abduction, torture, bombings, and killings. Some Christians were pressured to convert to Islam under threat of death or expulsion, and women were ordered to wear Islamic dress.

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Car Bomb Explodes in Aleppo
Aleppo, Syria
By Transterra Editor
17 Jan 2014

A car bomb exploded on Thursday morning, January 17, in the Al-Ansari neighborhood, Aleppo. According to the journalist, the bodies on the street are Daesh fighters.

Video Footage:
Interview in the video with Bakri Zureiq, military commander in the Army of the Mujahideen:

"A car bomb. God knows its source. The source of car bombs is usually known. They targeted civilian areas. There are no military bases or areas.
It exploded between the civilians.
You can see on the camera. Dead bodies, and here is the car (points to it).
May God take revenge on the unjust."

Car Bomb Explodes in Aleppo Shot List:

1-People walking in the blast area
2-Arrival of the ambulance and a man opening a road for it by clearing debris
3-Broken glasses on the ground
4-bloody parts of victims
5-destroyed shop
6-parts of crushed car
7-parts of crushed cars
8-parts of the exploded car
9-Interview with commander in the Army of Al Mujahideen
10- Car plate with number and Homs written on
11- the exploded vehicle
12-parts of the expolded vehicle
13-parts of the expolded vehicle
14-parts of the expolded vehicle
15- the body of the deceased on the ground
16- people gathering around the vehicle
17- A dead body on the ground
18-Close up on the dead body without showing the face
19- Half of the exploded vehicle
20- Close up on the exploded vehicle
21-People checking the exploded vehicle
22- A dead body from on the road and two people passing by observing it
23- Close up on a dead body that is wearing a military jacket
24-Close up on the hand of a dead body
25- A man wearing military clothes checking one of the dead bodies
26- A man pulls a black belt off one of the deceased victims
27- An armed man holding part of the blaster belt and walking away
28- Two armed men in the explosion area and civilians standing around

By: Hussien Al Abdalla

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Bangkok Shutdown
Bangkok, Thailand
By Transterra Editor
14 Jan 2014

A photojournalist has been covering the unrest in Thailand throughout January, including the "Bangkok shutdown," as protestors set up blockades in an effort to shut down to capital to force their demand that Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra steps down. Violence has hit the demonstrations on January, as a grenade was launched into a crowd of anti-government protesters, injuring dozens. At least 8 people have died since the beginning of the demonstrations.

Photos by KC Ortiz

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Fighters of Bab Al Tebbaneh, Tripoli
Tripoli, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
26 Oct 2013

In Lebanon’s second largest city, Tripoli, Alawites loyal to Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime battle with Sunni's that support the Free Syrian opposition that live within blocks of each-other. The proxy conflict in Tripoli began over 30 years ago during the Lebanese civil war under the Syrian military occupation. Many of the Sunni fighters have crossed into Syria to fight alongside the Free Syrian Army against the regime and its allies. Tripoli, is a city that directly reflects the sectarian divisions in neighboring Syria. WIth the bombings in both Tripoli and Beirut's Dahiyeh the sectarian arms race in Tripoli continues for weaponry for what they fear is going to be the worst fighting seen in the region. Alawites populate a hillside called Jabal Mohsen and the Sunnis live in Bab al Tebbaneh that rests in the valley at the base of the hill. Events in Syria easily trigger an exchange of sniper fire and sporadic mortar shelling. All militias engaged in the conflict are heavily armed with RPGs, mortars, and heavy machine guns. In one night, over 1,000 mortars were exchanged in Tripoli. The Lebanese army has returned repeatedly to try and stabilize the area resulting in many casualties without making headway. The army has created a buffer zone on the infamous Syria Street, which has served as a front line between the battling sects since the conflict began. The Sunni fighters are always in preparation for a final fight against their pro Assad regime Alawite neighbors.

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Education for Syrian Refugees in Akka...
Akkar, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
16 Jan 2014

Children running in pajamas and sandals along the frozen field, while their fathers and grandfathers are building the house of a Lebanese family for free, is the first sight you see as you enter the Syrian refugee settlement of Minyara, in Akkar. It is a vision of despair for the Syrian refugees, in a mountainous region where a 3-month-old Syrian baby died of cold in December 2013. But something else you see as you enter the settlement that these Syrians families from Qusayr rent every year from a Lebanese field-owner for $1000, you understand that there are kids are just having fun between two school lessons.

Inside two tents, warmed by a wood-burning stove, small tables and chairs constitute minimalist classrooms. Muhammad, a Syrian teacher whose right arm has been wounded by a bullet in Qusayr, teaches Arabic, mathematics and sciences through songs, games and books he made up, thanks to his 15 years of experience as a teacher in Syria. As for English and French, two volunteer teachers from the NGO Relief & Reconciliation for Syria come every morning to help Syrian children from 1st to 6th grade with these foreign languages, compulsory to enter the Lebanese school system.

Children are cold and traumatized by what they have gone through in Qusayr. After fleeing their city, they walked for 16 km under the bombs of the Syrian regime in summer 2013. Despite this, now education is their hope for a better future and their motivation is boundless. In 2013, 85,000 Syrian children were registered in Lebanese public schools and 100,000 in informal ones, according to Maha Shuayb, director of the Center for Lebanese Studies. But 97 percent of Syrian children drop out of the Lebanese education system. Illiteracy may then be the major issue for the 1.3 million of Syrian refugees in Lebanon, as 50 percent of them are children.

Obstacles such as the language gap and the necessity for many Syrian families to rely on their children’s work to survive limit the access to education. In Minyara, Relief & Reconciliation helps children who try to enter Lebanese schools, but also those who decide to work, with vocational training such as electricity and couture. As Friedrich Bokern, director of the NGO, explains to the children gathered under the tent of the classroom: “Whatever you will decide to do, don’t be afraid. You are the future of Syria.”

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Havana's Crumbling Houses
Havana, Cuba
By Transterra Editor
13 Sep 2013

Housing in Havana, Cuba

“It’s falling down.” This was the answer I invariably received when I asked the residents of Old and Central Havana about their homes. 

These photographs are born from my desire to see what living inside the crumbling grandeur of Havana’s buildings looks like. I photographed inside and outside almost a hundred different homes. Most of the homes I visited are in Old Havana.



Old Havana was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1982. Since this date, many buildings have been restored and though the work continues, the emphasis is always on preserving key buildings rather than improving or saving the lives of the general population. While certain buildings are done up to a high standard, the vast majority of the homes remain in a dangerous state. 

Age, decay, neglect, over-crowding and amateur repairs combine with natural factors to threaten the stability of Havana’s Baroque, Neoclassical and Art Deco buildings. There are two or three partial or totally building collapses in Old and Central Havana every week. Residents have no choice but to continue to live in these buildings that have partially collapsed.

Seven out of every ten homes are in need of major repairs, according to official statistics. Some of the main issues faced by the people living in Havana are dangerous, including outdated electrical wiring, basic or even nonexistent plumbing, floors and walls that are unstable or that have already caved in, collapsing roofs and ceilings, water damage, mold and dangerously unstable stairs.

A shortage of homes means the province around the capital needs some 300,000 more properties. Most of the once high-ceilinged houses of Havana have been divided both vertically and horizontally to provide more floor space. This puts the already weakened structures under additional strain. It also creates many dwellings with no windows or ventilation.

 Despite the many positive developments in education and healthcare the communist regime has bought about Cuba, it has failed with Article 9 of Cuba’s Constitution: The state shall work to ensure that no citizen is denied comfortable housing.


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"Los Habaneros," the People of Havana
Havana,Cuba
By Transterra Editor
13 Sep 2013

The People of Havana

In September 2013, I photographed almost 100 people inside their homes in Havana. The inside of a person’s home says as much about their personality as their portrait does, and most of the homes I visited were filled with personal, social, cultural, economic and religious clues about their Cuban occupants. These interiors testified to the many hardships the people of Havana endure and the Cuban people’s resilience and resourcefulness.

Despite the years of international isolation, economic sanctions and general hardship, the people of Havana are warm, welcoming and positive. They are determined to enjoy life. There’s a strong sense of community in every neighborhood. Vulnerable people are supported by their community and no one is isolated.

Cubans make do with what they have. When something breaks, it’s fixed with whatever material that can be found. Nothing is wasted. Frequently it seems that nothing is thrown away. Despite the poor state of the buildings and the cramped conditions, most of the homes I visited were also filled with vibrant colours, mementos, belongings, beloved pets and human warmth and spirit.

The poor housing situation in Havana contrasts sharply with the many positive changes to society that the Communist Party has bought about. The housing in Havana lags far behind all the other indicators of development. Although the government still struggles to provide citizens with safe and comfortable housing, Cuba has a high life expectancy (79 years is the average), a 99.8 percent literacy rate, free education at every level and free health care for all its citizens.

These discrepancies between the housing conditions and the level of education and health care create a situation that is unique to Cuba. This is a country where a highly specialized doctor, for example, has no other option but to live in a cramped and humid room, in a dangerously unstable building.

There are however inconsistencies between the living standards of certain people. Not everyone is in the same situation and some people are able to live in better homes. This is often due to government connections. Residents who have family members working abroad and who send money to them and residents who are paid directly by tourists also have the means to improve their housing situation.

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Mount Sinabung Eruption
Indonesia
By Transterra Editor
15 Jan 2014

Mount Sinabung in Indonesia has continued to erupt since September. The resulting ash and destruction has forced people to flee their homes after eruptions, when their homes and villages have been covered in ash.

Last week, because of multiple eruptions, more than 25,000 people had to evacuate their villages. People in the Sigarang-Garang village in Karo district, Indonesia's North Sumatra province, are pictured below, fleeing by any means possible, while the Indonesian army has worked to clear the roads. Authorities raised the alert status for the volcano to the highest level in November 2013.

Photos By: Y.T Haryono

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South Sudan in Crisis
South Sudan
By Transterra Editor
15 Jan 2014

Soldiers from the South Sudanese People's Liberation Army (SPLA) retook the capital Bentiu of Unity State in the north of South Sudan. Bentiu was recaptured from the hands of the rebels, who are led by former Vice Riis Riek Machar by the (SPLA). This unity State is one of the most valuable states in South Sudan and a major oil producer in the country. The rebels and government forces are at a stalemate as government forces press north toward the rebel-held strategical town of Bor. According to The UN, after one month of fighting in South Sudan, there has been thousands of people killed and over 400,000. Many religious groups and their leaders are peacefully condemning the fighting, but the conflict continues.

Photography By: Samir Bol
More Photos Here: http://transterramedia.com/users/2271

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Unrest in the Philippines
Roosevelt, Manila, Metro Manila, Philippines
By Transterra Editor
01 Feb 2012

Filipino Muslim rebels shout 'Allahuakbar' as they raise their weapons in this photograph taken on October 15, 2012 during a celebration inside their camp in the southern Philippine town of Sultan Kudarat, Philippines after their organization, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front signed a peace agreement with the central government, ending a rebellion which lasted four decades.

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Government Forces in South Sudan Rega...
South Sudan
By Transterra Editor
14 Dec 2013

BENTIU, SOUTH SUDAN - JANUARY 12: Soldiers from South Sudan's army or South Sudanese People's Liberation Army (SPLA in the capital Bentiu of Unity State, in northern South Sudan,, after Bentiu recovered from the hands of the rebels, led by former Vice Riis Riek Machar, and this unity State is one of the most States in South Sudan oil producer in the country.

Photo By Samir Bol

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Ramallah Today
Ramallah, Palestine
By Transterra Editor
13 Jan 2014

A collection of images of daily life and suffering under occupation in Palestine.

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South Sudanese artists organized a co...
Juba , South Sudan
By Transterra Editor
10 Jan 2014

Juba 10/1/2014 : A number of artists organized a concert for peace and unity in South Sudan, and the ceremony, which was held, which looked at ten in the morning until six in the evening at the tomb of Dr. John Garang, Photo By Samir Bol

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Salt Workers of The Danakil Depressio...
Berahile, Ethiopia
By Transterra Editor
02 May 2012

The Danakil depression -- specifically the area surrounding Lake Afdera is the place where the majority of the salt production in Ethiopia is found. The lake yields more than 1.3 million tons of salt annually and around 750 officially registered salt miners work in this area. Teams of Muslim Afar and Christian Tigrayans from the Ethiopian Highlands gather daily to mine the salt and transport it by camelsand donkyes to a small town called Berahile. In the past, the salt blocks -- called amolé -- were used all over Ethiopia as money. Although cash has replaced the salt, the trade itself remains the main livelihood of the Ethiopian Afar. They guard and manage the “white gold” as their greatest treasure.

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Namibia housing crisis
Rehoboth , Namibia
By Transterra Editor
31 Dec 2012

20 Dec 2013 in Rehoboth , Namibia. Namibia, with a population of around 2 million, ranked fourth in 2012 for the biggest housing price increases in the world. Prices have dropped slightly in 2013 but are double what they were six years ago, putting it beyond the reach of most Namibians. More and more people are forced to live in corrugated iron shacks dotted around most big towns and the capital Windhoek. Photo/ Karel Prinsloo

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The Rehoboth Basters
rehoboth
By Transterra Editor
31 Dec 2012

The Rehoboth Basters people in Namibia are descendants of European Colonists and Indigenous Khoi-People.The Basters are in between cultures, neither belonging to the majority of black Namibian's or the minority white Namibian.They have truly been in no man's land and are struggling to preserve their identity and their culture. A new generation is now grown up, born in an independent Namibia.

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Daily Life in El Aaiun, Western Sahara
El Aaiun, Western Sahara
By Transterra Editor
15 Nov 2013

Inside the Western Sahara are the little-known Saharawis, where about 50,000 make up a tenth of the total population. Double that number is the amount of Moroccan security personnel - 100,000. Life is difficult there, with rife unemployment.

Many of these people tell stories of being arrested and beaten during peaceful demonstrations. While those Saharawis arrested talk of humiliations, beatings and torture, others speak of relatives engaged in political activities and protests who have been imprisoned, allegedly on false charges.

Many among the younger generation of Saharawis are getting increasingly frustrated with the lack of progress and the difficult life, and some are talking about reigniting the armed struggle against Morocco.

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Catholics March for Peace in South Su...
Juba,south Sudan
By Transterra Editor
10 Jan 2014

Juba 9/9/2013: On the 9th of January, 2005 in Kenya, a comprehensive peace agreement to stop the longest war in Sudan was signed. After that, South Sudan gained independence from Sudan. Today South Sudan faces a new war. Catholics in Juba march to prayer for peace in South Sudan. This prayer was attended by the ambassador of the United States to South Sudan, Ambassador Suzan Page. Photo by Samir Bol.

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Female Migrant Workers Overcome Chall...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
07 Jan 2014

Migrant workers in Lebanon have little protection under current labor laws, leaving them vulnerable to exploitation. Many of Lebanon’s estimated 200,000 domestic workers who come to the country for work often face extremely challenging living and working conditions. The Human Rights Watch estimated that in 2008, an average of one domestic worker died in Lebanon per week. Most of these deaths are a result of suicides or attempts to escape their employers. Even when they manage to escape, once their contract is broken, they no longer have identification documents and can end up in an even more deplorable situation.

But despite the challenges and dire situations for a majority of migrant domestic workers, some of them done incredible things in Lebanon with their personal strength and the support of their network in the country. Women like Rahel Zegeye, who is a domestic worker by day and a filmmaker/artist by night, or Rahel Abebe, who started a catering service for Ethiopian food in Lebanon’s capital of Beirut, and was Lebanon's first migrant worker to have a lawsuit filed on her behalf against discrimination, are some of the women who have come the Middle East as migrant workers and thrived.

Photos by Omar Alkalouti
Text by Melissa Tabeek

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Mount Sinabung Eruption
Karo, North Sumatra, Indonesia
By Transterra Editor
04 Jan 2014

Mount Sinabung volcano spews ash and lava as seen from Tiga Kicat village in Karo district, Indonesia's North Sumatra province, early morning January 5, 2014. About 20,000 villagers have been evacuated since authorities raised the alert status for Sinabung to the highest level in November 2013, local media reported on Monday.

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The Salt Workers of the Danakil Depre...
Ethiopia,Africa
By Transterra Editor
02 May 2013

The Danakil Depression -- specifically the area surrounding Lake Afdera -- is the place from which close to 100% of the salt production in Ethiopia comes. The lake yields more than 1.3 million tons of salt annually and around 750 officially registered salt miners work in this area. Teams of Muslim Afar and Christian Tigrayans from the Ethiopian Highlands gather daily, and ten months out of the year, they mine the salt and transport it by camel and donkey to a small town called Berahile. In the past, the salt blocks -- called amolé -- were used all over Ethiopia as money. Although cash has replaced the salt, the trade itself remains the main livelihood of the Ethiopian Afar, and they guard and manage the “white gold” as their greatest treasure.

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Bosnian Landmine Survivors
Bosnia
By Transterra Editor
06 Jan 2014

Almost two decades after the war in Bosnia & Herzegovina ended with the signing of the Dayton Peace Agreement, the country remains threatened by more than 120,000 landmines, a dark legacy of the war, buried in the ground along former frontlines. As urban areas are meanwhile largely demined, people living in the remote landside of Bosnia are permanently threatened by the silent hazard near their homes.

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Spotlight on Hope & Heartbreak: Child...
Syria
By Transterra Editor
03 Jan 2014

Selected 2013 images of the hope and heartbreak that Syrian children embody.

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Global LGBT Spotlight
Worldwide
By Transterra Editor
01 Jan 2014

A Transterra spotlight with selected images documenting LGBT communities and issues in Armenia, Myanmar, Malaysia, Pakistan, Nepal, Hong Kong, Mongolia, Moscow, Turkey and Iran. Most images below are selected from collections and photo essays available on Transterra. See the links below for some examples:
Transgender in Armenia: http://transterramedia.com/collections/879
Natkadaw Festival in Myanmar: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1375
Transgender Political Candidate in Pakistan: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1030
My Life as a Nepalese Transgender: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1430
Being a Gay Journalist in Hong Kong: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1291
TransMongolian: http://transterramedia.com/collections/939
Turkey's LGBT Asylum Seekers: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1107
The Holy Wigs - Jerusalem Drag Queens: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1399

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Christmas at The Maela Refugee Camp
Myanmar, Karen State, Burma, Thailand
By Transterra Editor
24 Dec 2013

The Thai-Burmese border area is an exotic and dangerous paradise at the same time. However, for most people, it is unknown.

Nearly 30 years ago, the first Karen minority refugees who escaped Myanmar arrived to this area. Today more than 50,000 people are living at the Maela refugee camp, situated 70 km north of MaeSot, a recently economically booming border city.

Although at first glance this might seem like an idyllic village, where the quality of life of its inhabitants is much higher than the "normal" standard of other refugees around the world, the Burmese who live in the camp have suffered the most atrocious violence by the Myanmar army. The majority of the camp resident are Christians. During Christmas Eve and holy days, they celebrate in the numerous Churches spread around the camp. Night shows and masses attract the devotes to the Churches and presents are distributed. The camp's residents have been stuck in a small corner of tropical forest with no choice but to live with dignity between the barbed wire fences surrounding the camp, under strict control of the Thai army.

A ceasefire was signed between the Karen leaders and the Myanmar authorities. However,there are many rumors about the Karen being repatriated back to their country which is a first step on the long way of reconciliation.

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MOISE KATUMBI CHAPWE : THE PEOPLE'S G...
Democratic Republic of Congo
By Transterra Editor
10 Sep 2013

Lubumbashi-Katanga Province-Democratic Republic of Congo- September 11th,2013-One of the 50 most influential Africans, Moise Katumbi Chapwe, in addition to being governor of Katanga Province, the Democratic Republic of Congos mining heartland, is even a businessman and ows a famous african soccer team, the TP Mazembe. Internationally known as The Jew from Katanga, Moise Katumbi Chapwe, the multimillionaire congolese businessman is the powerful governor of the province of Katanga, one the mineral-rich Wild West zones of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Moise Katumbi Chapwe is the son of Nissim Soriano, one of hte many Sephardic Italian Jews who emigrated to the Congo from the Greek Rhodes Island (then under Italian rule) to flee the Nazis prior to World War II.The picture shows Governor Moise Katumbi Chapwe, with the soccer players of the TP Mazembe, the team he ows, inside the Mazembe stadium.

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Downtown Beirut Bombing
Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
27 Dec 2013

A former Lebanese finance minister and ambassador to the United States, Mohamad Chatah, was killed Friday when a road side car bomb struck his convoy in downtown Beirut.
Five were killed and 70 were wounded, Lebanon's health ministry said. Cars were burned beyond recognition as a wall of flames and thick black smoke shot up from the blast site. The clean up continues as bomb experts comb the scene for any clues.

Photos By: Omar Alkalouti

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The Kids from Lunik IX
Slovakia
By Transterra Editor
23 Dec 2013

Lunik IX is an apartment complex in the southwestern suburbs of Košice, Slovakia. Originally build as home for middle-class families with a capacity of 2,500 people, the Slovakian government started to resettled thousands of Slovakian people affiliated to the Roma minority in the 1990s. Today Lunik IX is home to an estimated number of between 6,000 and 8,000 Roma making it the largest Roma community within Slovakia.

Over the years Lunik IX evolved into an urban slum. The unemployment rate is nearly 100%, inhabitants aren’t able to pay their water, gas or electricity bills. The waste disposal isn’t working, inhabitants constantly throw their trash right out of the window.

Several buildings are in an unacceptable condition and at risk to collapse. Between my last two visits one complex has been demolished for ‘security reasons’. The toxic standard of the waste disposal has reached a dangerous high level even starting to harm the town’s ground water. Only during certain hours a day people are supplied with freshwater.

The children from Lunik IX are the first who suffer from these horrible conditions and they should be the last to blame for their situation. Lunik IX is overcrowded, more and more flats become uninhabitable, winters are long and cold. Open fires inside the flats, rat plagues, diseases, malnutrition and worse hygiene standards are among the fatal threats threatening the children in Lunik IX.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
21 Dec 2013

A small group of Lebanese citizens in Beirut organized a Facebook page to bring awareness to the refugee issues in Lebanon, Lebanese for Syrians. The page became an avenue for Lebanese to donate and volunteer to help with the desperate displaced people in their country. In only a week, the page allowed the civil campaign to raised over $40,000 in donations and implement their first medical aid mission with a volunteer medical team in both the town of Arsal and beyond the Lebanese military borders into “no-mans-land” where displaced Syrians are living in makeshift shelters.

The organizer, Carol Maalouf, was overwhelmed to witness the amount of Lebanese willing to help Syrian refugees. This help is necessary, as the refugees in Arsal are preparing for what is being predicted by many to be one of Lebanon’s worst winters in decades. Thousands of these displaced people live in terrible conditions in a barely habitable area that separates Lebanon from Syria, and is subject to aircraft missile strikes, mortar fire and sporadic border clashes from the Syrian conflict, being fought less then a mile away.

The majority of the refugees in Arsal and surrounding areas are from Qusair and Qulamoun. Both of these towns are major conflict areas with constant clashes between the Syrian Army and the Opposition. The situation for these people is dire and they are in need of medical aid, shelters, food and clothing. The area is mostly populated with women and children without any medical aid or supplies from NGOs that do not enter the region, but rather stop at the last check point of the Lebanese Army. The Lebanese for Syrians initiative is quickly growing in influence with the help of social media and will continue to help and bring awareness to the Lebanese people through their fellow citizens.

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Russia Delivers Aid to Syrian Refugee...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
19 Dec 2013

Russia delivered 46 tons of aid to Syrian refugees in Lebanon on Wednesday to Rafik Hariri International Airport, the fifth such plane to come to Lebanon since the beginning of the conflict in Syria.

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Hassan Rouhani and a Changing Iran
Iran
By Transterra Editor
08 Dec 2013

Hassan Rouhani's election shook the Iranians and gave them hope for a new beginning of change in the country. The nuclear deal has received a good welcome and foreign minister Mohammad Zavad Zarif, who has a million Facebook followers, is an idol for the young generations. But everybody agrees there should be a clear improvement of internal politics. There are businessmen happy for the new relationship with Western countries, and because the "Ahmadinejiad incompetents" are not in charge any more. Those part of the Green Revolution who did not go to vote even say that Rouhani is better than nothing.

It is common knowledge that Rouhani is the last pawn Ali Khamenei can play to prevent an economic collapse - the middle class is exausted due to inflation, sanctions and corruption - and to earn time before new generations would strongly rebel.

Rouani is trying to change Iran step by step. His government is discussing a free internet, it has readmitted some students at the university after 2009 clashes, it has called back the banished (and some of them are returning), and promised to free Moussavi and Kharroubi. On the other hand, many electoral promises, as a weaker control on the press and the limitation of death penalties, are still too far away to be realized.

Iranians are more relaxed and hopeful rather than two years ago, but they know that if Rouhani fails in his economical and social mission, Iran would fall into chaos. These photos capture a country that is working for change, but still held tightly by economic sanctions and an increasingly difficult situation, for the middle class of Iran in particular.

Photos by Linda Dorigo

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Prosthetic Limb Center for Syrians
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Transterra Editor
26 Nov 2013

A prosthetic limb center recently opened just outside Reyhanli, Turkey. The center helps those who have lost limbs in the fighting in Syria. The center manufactures high quality prosthetics on-site, assigns them to the wounded and helps with the rehabilitation process afterwards.

The clinic now produces limbs with a quality that can be compared to European standards, however, none of the staff at the center have a medical background. Some of the staff are previous patients, and have been trained by teams visiting from teams that also visit Pakistan, the UK and elsewhere in Turkey.

The clinic is already treating up to 10 patients a day, but there are thousands more in need. To reach them those in need, there are plans in progress to launch a mobile center that will work from inside Syria next year.

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Coal Miners in Slovenia
Zagorie
By Transterra Editor
12 Dec 2013

Miners in Zasavje region in Slovenia celebrate their holiday on December 4, which is also St. Barbara's day. St. Barbara is miners' patron who keeps their health and safety. In Zagorje, the festival is held with small parade and a mass dedicated to coalminers later on. Zasavje was a region with over than 250 years of coal-mining tradition. The last production day was in the late spring this year. Coalminers were worried about their future at that time. Government gave a promise to evaluate possibilites of opening a new coal mine, but since than no progress was made. This photo story presents coalminers' days from their starting shift in the early morning, documenting the rough working conditions almost 300 meters deep and then finally their exit from the coal mine. The photos of exiting coalminers are actually their last shift. After more than half of year later coalminers gathered together to clebrate their history and never forgotten tradition.

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The Syrian War
Syria
By Transterra Editor
04 Jan 2012

It is estimated that close to 3500 Syrian fled through Khlaed Walid because of the war inside their country. Some families have found empty homes once they passed the Lebanese Syrian border and now live in them. A dozen Syrian families from the area of Homs have escaped into Lebanon and now live in an old school.
The Syrian army has laid many mines in the area. The Syrian army, a mere 200 yards from the village has been firing from high positions with the help of numerous snipers. These snipers have killed many civilians since the start of the rebellion in March 2011. It is estimated that 6000 people have died so far, but this is most likely a low estimate. This part of the front sees countless Syrian refugees crossing over long side wounded rebel soldiers fighting the Assad regime.
January 4, 2012-Khaled Walid, Lebanon.

Photos by Jonathan Alpeyrie/Polaris.

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The Dead Cities of Syria
Idlib, Syria
By Transterra Editor
16 Mar 2013

Dead cities in Syria are the remains of the Roman and Byzantine settlements in the north-western of Syria. In 2012, during the civil war in Syria, more than one million people had to abandon their homes and sought safe shelter. They came to the places where the Ancients buried their dead. In places such as Shansharah, Robia, Serjilla the living found shelter within the dead in ruins and tombs, often underground. They are exposed to cold, and are often wet, hungry, and vulnerable to disease.
Many who fled from their homes, couldn't take much with them, the heaviest luggage they carry is their memories filled with the images, sounds and smells of an ongoing war. Although they hide, danger accompanies them each day with the constant risk of shelling coupled with gnawing hunger. The risk of contracting Tuberculosis or Leishmaniasis is an everyday reality.

Photographs by Maciej Moskwa/TESTIGO Documentary.

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Ukrainian Protests
Kiev, Ukraine
By Transterra Editor
03 Dec 2013

Despite threats of serious criminal charges, hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians have taken to the streets since late November, blockading government buildings and protesting against their government they accuse of returning the country to Kremlin control. This photo essay is an inside look at protesters' life and organization in the past two weeks of escalating protests.

Photos by: Maciej Moskwa / TESTIGO

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Anti-Government Protests in Bangkok
Thailand
By Transterra Editor
05 Dec 2013

Thousands of protesters have taken to the streets of the Thai capital since the
beginning of November. A draft amnesty bill discussed by the Parliament last 4th of November was the trigger of the onset of protests. The so-called reconciliation bill was aimed to grant amnesty to people guilty of political crimes during Thailand’s political turmoil (2005-2010), giving pardon almost to anyone facing charges arising during that time.

The Democrat Party, main opposition and leader of the protests, believed that the bill was aimed to allow Mr Thaksin to return to Thailand without having to serve a jail sentence. The former premier, in self-imposed exile since his conviction on corruption charges , was ousted in a coup in 2006. Mr Thaksin, the prime minister’s elder brother, is one of the most polarizing figures in Thailand.

Even though the controversial amnesty bill has been rejected by thailand’s Senate, the anti-government protesters, led by a former opposition Democratic Party lawmaker, remain in the streets. Now protesters want the government of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra to step down. Initially protests were taking place peacefully, with crowds blowing whistles as a distinctive. Lately, protests turned violent with clashes against police and between both groups: anti-government protesters and red-shirts.

After two years of relative peace, Thailand face again a political and social crisis. A social rupture with an uncertain outcome.

View More Photos: http://transterramedia.com/users/1093

Photos and Text by: Biel Calderon

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After the Spring: Libya Beyond the He...
Libya
By Transterra Editor
06 Dec 2013

As news of violent militias, unchecked powers, rebel uprisings and high profile kidnappings fill the pages, turmoil and discontent fill many minds. Though, it is easy to get caught up in the loudest elements of regime change. We often forget that Libya, is home to many people, many of whom are trying to rebuild and grow after years of hardship.

As this fledgling democracy finds its feet, Libyans enjoy the freedom of daily life. Despite all the hardship Libyans struggle with due to the conflict, there is room for new opportunities because of the war. Booming after the controlling government of the Gadhafi era, many of the spheres he regulated are now wide open. News outlets in Libya expanded from a handful of censored papers to hundreds of newspapers, radio shows, and cable channels. Many presume that the countries new constitution will hold greater rights for women and minorities. Intrepid women have taken to running for elected office and opening small businesses. Libyans feel liberated and can indulge in pastimes banned under the strict Gaddafi regime such as boxing and several media outlets have launched on account of the new freedom of press. Much has changed for the better, shelled stores have been rebuilt and are back in business and the fragile government grows more cohesive every day.

After a year of civil war, life has begun to move beyond the revolution. Babies are birthed every day into the new fledgling country, marriages officiated and soldiers repatriated. While the violence in Libya has diminished allowing room for regrowth, sporadic flares of conflict take the main stage while a critical part of the story of the revolution is ignored. Libya, now more than ever, isn’t simply violent rebels in a dusty desert depicted in western media.

Students have returned to class working through the summer to make up time lost and progress with their degrees. Student government, which was also banned under the previous government is now a popular club as Libyans; who haven’t voted in 42 years exercise their rights regularly. Often voting on even the smallest things.

Though some things will never change in this desert country. The beach is still a popular destination, with families filing the sand every evening. Amusement parks are now open, after crews were quickly dispatched to fix the damage and cover the bullet holes.

The Libyan people are experiencing a whole range of emotions that go beyond violence and suffering. Libya’s rehabilitation efforts as a country move slowly though they are much more powerful and important than the dissonance among few and with that, healing can begin.

Rebirth has come to the country, and with that the brave can find forgiveness among neighbors and a country can find peace.

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Nelson Mandela Resonates Throughout A...
South Africa
By Transterra Editor
06 Dec 2013

A photojournalist documents the famous, late, leader, Nelson Mandela and his resonance throughout South Africa, from where he was imprisoned to artwork on city walls. Mandela passed away on December 5, 2013.

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Economic Sanctions Affect Iran
Iran
By Transterra Editor
20 Nov 2013

Hassan Rouhani's election shook the Iranians and gave them hope for a new beginning of change in the country. The nuclear deal has received a good welcome and foreign minister Mohammad Zavad Zarif, who has a million Facebook followers, is an idol for the young generations. But everybody agrees there should be a clear improvement of internal politics. There are businessmen happy for the new relationship with Western countries, and because the "Ahmadinejiad incompetents" are not in charge any more. Those part of the Green Revolution who did not go to vote even say that Rouhani is better than nothing.

It is common knowledge that Rouhani is the last pawn Ali Khamenei can play to prevent an economic collapse - the middle class is exausted due to inflation, sanctions and corruption - and to earn time before new generations would strongly rebel.

Rouani is trying to change Iran step by step. His government is discussing a free internet, it has readmitted some students at the university after 2009 clashes, it has called back the banished (and some of them are returning), and promised to free Moussavi and Kharroubi. On the other hand, many electoral promises, as a weaker control on the press and the limitation of death penalties, are still too far away to be realized.

Iranians are more relaxed and hopeful rather than two years ago, but they know that if Rouhani fails in his economical and social mission, Iran would fall into chaos. These photos capture a country that is working for change, but still held tightly by economic sanctions and an increasingly difficult situation for the middle class of Iraq in particular.

Photos by Linda Dorigo
Text by Andrea Milluzzi

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Syrian Refugee Children in Lebanon Ex...
Tyre,Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
01 Aug 2013

"Fifty Syrian refugee children gathered to be taught rehabilitation through the Arts in Salafand refugee camp in Tyre, Lebanon. During this period, they were taught to express themselves in the realms of theatre, painting and arts and crafts. None of the children have continued their studies since they fled their countries for their lives. The average family size consists of five children. Although mothers are present for the most part, most of the fathers are either still at war, missing in action or deceased. During the 14-day workshop (August 1 - 14, 2013), the children were very open to talking about their stories of less, despair and rehabilitation. They were also very keen on being photographed and kept on insisting that I develop the pictures for them on the spot. It was difficult to explain to them that this was an impossible feat with a digital camera. The children ranged from ages 1 to 11 and spend their days playing in unfinished buildings near their decrepit camps. Their houses mainly consist on loose sheets held up by clothing pins, bit and pieces collected from construction sites and recycled containers. The NGOs involved in the making of the workshop were Sawa for Syria, the Civil Engineering Club of the American University of Beirut and the Naked Wagon."

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Qatar football school
Doha,Qatar
By Transterra Editor
23 Oct 2013

Grassroots development

While the world is busy discussing if World Cup 2022 should be taken away from Qatar or moved to the winter, people in Qatar is busy playing football. Fans are attending games in the Qatar stars league, children are training in clubs and grown ups are playing in amateur leagues. With still 8.5 or 8 years, depend on the decision by FIFA, there is enough time to improve the football culture in Qatar and remove all the negative expectations about 2022 World Cup.

Qatar is a country of only 2,042,444 (July 2013 est.) which includes only 15% Qataris. The rest is expats mainly from other Arabic countries, Philippines and Bangladesh, Nepal, India and Pakistan. With the future of Qatar, a future of expansion (4.19% growth rate), and thereby more foreigners, Qatar is multicultural and a view/analysis of the football culture needs to include expats.

One of FIFA’s central missions is the encouragement and development of football at grassroots and thereby also one of the reasons for giving the 2022 World Cup to Qatar. There are 2 major players in children and youth development in Qatar: Espire soccer academy and Evolution soccer. While Espire soccer academy is focusing on young players from across the world (they offer scholarships and trainings to the best talents from around the world) and the biggest Qatari talents, Evolution Soccer is focusing on the grassroots and young people living in Qatar.

Evolution Soccer was established in 2007 and is the country's biggest multi-sports course provider for children and young people aged 3 - 18 years old. The goal was to create a soccer coaching resource for the burgeoning population of both Qatari and expat players and coaches. Since then, Evolution Soccer has grown to become one of the most respected soccer academies in the Middle East growing from 350 kids in 2007 to over 1200 in 2013.

Tommy Westmoreland, manager of Evo Soccer Qatar, Evo soccer describes Evo soccer as the only real grassroots programme in Qatar and notes they have a strong relationship with Qatar Football Assocation (QFA) and Qatar Stars League (QSL) with spreading the word on the league (with 1200 kids plus parents they have access to more than is attending games during a normal weekend) and arrange trips to the big games with sometimes over 1000 supporters. With around 85% of the population is expats Evo Soccer is one of the main ways for the QFA and QSL to inform about the expats about the existence of the different clubs.

Our mission is to deliver top level soccer training and instruction with the objective of guiding players to attain their maximum potential in the game according to Tommy Westmoreland. 2 of their former players have attained such a high maximum level they have been signed by other clubs and professional programmes. Niall Mason, English, played for Evo Soccer between 2008 and 2011before joining Blackburn Rovers and he is now playing for Southampton’s Under 18 team. Omar Al-Emadi, Qatari, played for Evo Soccer during the first year before being signed for Aspire, the government talent programme, and is part of the golden generation which are hoped to excel at 2022 World Cup.

In 2016 Evo soccer will move to a new home with 2 x full size football pitches and 2
x indoor sports halls. Evo Soccer will then be able to take on more members and
improve the quality of the training. Tommy Westmoreland hopes that they will be
able to compete in local leagues in the future as is vital to the development of the
academy players. Currently they play with their Under 19 team (but with an average
age of 15) in the Qatar International Amateur League where they play with adult
teams.

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Qatar Fans
Doha, Qatar
By Transterra Editor
23 Oct 2013

While the world is busy discussing if World Cup 2022 should be taken away from Qatar or
moved to the winter, people in Qatar are busy playing football. Fans are attending games in
during the Qatar stars league, children are training in clubs and grown ups are playing in amateur leagues. With the time of 8.5 or 8 years to wait depending on the decision by FIFA, there is enough time to improve the football culture in Qatar and remove all the negative expectations about 2022.

Qatar is a country of only 2,042,444 people (July 2013 est.) which includes only 15% Qataris. The rest is expats mainly from other Arabic countries, Philippines and Bangladesh, Nepal, India and Pakistan. With the future of Qatar, a future of expansion (4.19% growth rate), and thereby more foreigners, Qatar will be an even more multicultural country.

Football culture was introduced to Qatar in the 1940s and 1950s by oil workers from Europe. The Qatar Stars League (QSL) is the highest professional league in Qatari football with its first season played in 1963 and now in 2013, featuring 14 clubs with one club demoted to second.

From the beginning of the establishment of the league, it had problems attracting spectators even with high profile players like Raul, Pep Guardiola and Gabriel Batistuta. With only around 300.000 Qataris, expatriates must be brought in to increase the numbers. The official attendance is over 5000 in average but that is impossible with such a small population. Slovenia, a country with
similar population as Qatar (but almost all are Slovenians compared to Qatar) had an average of 530 spectators in the 2012/13 season.

The attendance in Qatar is probably similar (if not a bit lower) but a lot more loud; as singing through a megaphone and playing the drums throughout the game are common.

Qatar Football Assocation (QFA) and Qatar Stars League (QSL) have started a number
of initiatives to improve the attendance: relations with schools and embassies, various
communities, a fan club where you get points for watching a game and is offering price bonuses at some of the games. The initiatives have attracted more spectators but getting people to the stadium is a change of culture in a country where football is mostly watched at home, in front of the TV.

There are mainly 3 groups of fans with their own characteristics. Sometimes, depending on the club, are all present at games. Local fans are mostly fans paid to attend the games. There are fan coordinators who coordinate the cheering, singing and clapping and who circulate among the different clubs.

A band is playing local songs on drums and one or 2 fans is singing through out the whole game. Saadi Ahmed Al-Essa, a local who had paid for his ticket, at Al Sadd against Qatar SC, is going with his 2 children when there is a bigger game but he prefers to see the game in person.

The Asians represent the largest group of fans at most games. Khalil Khandoker is a Bangladeshi citizen, working in Qatar for a construction company. He is a the stadium for the game with some of his friends. Watching football is one of the cheapest activities possible for him in Doha ( a ticket is around 3 dollars) but mostly they do get free tickets.
The atmosphere is good he think with the dancing from the Africans and the music from
the locals. Asians are more quiet than the other groups but still clap and cheer during the game.

African spectators are coming to watch the games of the clubs with African players and if they live around one of the stadiums. African spectators are like they are at home: dancing and cheering in the most wonderful way. It seems they came to the stadium for the party and not the game.

With African spectators, Asians and locals on a stadium the atmosphere is energetic and loud: music, clapping, singing and dancing. Nnakeme Adeyemi, a Nigerian fan, at Al Wakrah against Al Sadd, is mostly at the stadium because of his friends and not the
football. But the atmosphere is good and he will surely return.

Compared to countries of similar size the Qatar Stars League has an attendance which is reasonable, and as anybody who has attended a game includes more singing and drumming from the spectators than similar crowds across the world.

Qatar Stars League will never be like Premier League in England but with the interest of Qataris, expats and initiates will be an attractive experience before 2022 World Cup.

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Syrian Conflict Footage: Editor's Picks
Syria
By Transterra Editor
29 Nov 2013

Conflict footage from both sides of the Syrian conflict, on the ground from contributors all over the country. This collection consists of produced, rough cut, and raw, footage.

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Multimedia: Editor's Picks
World Wide
By Transterra Editor
21 Nov 2013

Multimedia work from our contributors that focus on extraordinary subjects from around the world.

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Winged Death in Tanzania
Tanzania
By Transterra Editor
31 Dec 2011

Anopheles mosquito is the only one capable of harboring the human malaria parasite, and only females have an interest in the blood to nourish their eggs, the male takes nectar from flowers. Their legs are long and slender, wings mottled and the nose of a peak mosquito seems solid, but is a pod full of blades and a feeding tube. Pierces the skin with them, down to the micro-capillary network where it begins to drink blood.

The malaria Plasmodium parasite is tiny, similar in shape to a worm, it is enough to kill a person. To prevent blood clotting, mosquitoes use their saliva when the parasite enters the bloodstream. Within minutes he has traveled through the circulatory system to the liver.

In recent years the parasite has developed resistance to many drugs and the more potent strains can scarcely be controlled. Half the world population is threatened by her, and it endemic in some 106 countries and territories. The big problem is that all these countries are mostly poor, over 80% of cases occur in sub-Saharan Africa. The World Health Organization (WHO) has included among its Millennium Development Goals of reducing the incidence of malaria and its eradication in the future. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation invested hundreds of millions dollars in research and international donors increased its bud- getary allocation but the current crisis is doing great harm in the malaria ́s fight, and this is always quantified in human lives.

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Protesters Return to the Streets in T...
Thailand
By Transterra Editor
24 Nov 2013

After a period of relative calm in Thailand, mass street protests have returned to the capital, and have been ongoing for the last few months. The catalysts for the latest round of civil unrest was a controversial 'Amnesty Bill' introduced by the government which critics argued would have allowed for unhindered return of self exiled and former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra.

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Memory Books
Uganda
By Transterra Editor
23 Aug 2009

In Uganda, by the beginning of the 1990s, corpses kept piling up in the morgues and nobody knew what was going on. During the days when it seemed like hope had escaped that land, a few HIV positive women decided to bring it back, not for them but for their children.

That is how NACWOLA (National Community of Women Living with HIV/AIDS) was born, during the International Conference on AIDS held in Amsterdam in 1992. The three founding members died of AIDS during the following years, but their legacy was a ray of light in the darkest days. With the help of European health and psychology professionals, the decided to put in writing what they would never be able to tell their children, and they created the Memory Books. These books are their recollections, they tell us about them and the future they want for their children, pages full of words of care and affection. They are motherhood guides from beyond, survival tutorials for lost children, since over 12 percent of Sub-Saharan underage population will lose at least one of their parents in the next 12 months, and they will be on their own.

As Gladys, the person in charge of the Memory Books project in Luwero, the center of the country, tell us: “They are each special and very personal, in spite of following a common pattern that includes family
photos, memories and a family tree. With these books we encourage parents to listen to their children, to talk to them frankly about their disease.”

The project is like a big family with members helping each other emotionally and financially in
their daily struggle for survival. Mothers, orphans and grandmothers, many of them displaced by the internal war with the LRA (Lord’s Resistance Army). In a country where 35% of the population is HIV positive, where there are two million orphans, a country in which polygamy and dowry are common practice, these women are struggling against the AIDS stigma and are not afraid of anything.
NACWOLA and the project have given them hope.

Photos and text by David Rengel and Alvaro Laiz.

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Housing in Havana
Havana, Cuba
By Transterra Editor
10 Sep 2013

“It’s falling down.” This was the answer I invariably received when I asked the residents of Old and Central Havana about their homes.

These photographs originated from my desire to see what it looks like to living inside some of the crumbling grandeur of Havana’s buildings. I knocked on doors and begged for permission to photograph the residents and the interiors of their homes. I photographed inside almost a hundred different homes. Most of the homes I visited are in Old Havana. Old Havana was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1982. Since this date many key buildings have been restored and the work continues but the emphasis is always on preserving buildings rather than improving or saving making the lives of the general population easier. While certain buildings are restored to a higher standard, the vast majority of the homes remain in a dangerous condition.

Age, decay, neglect, over-crowding and amateur repairs combined with natural factors threaten the stability of Havana’s Baroque, Neoclassical and Art Deco buildings. There are two or three partial or total building collapses in Old and Central Havana every week. Residents have no choice but to continue to live in buildings that have partially collapsed.

Despite the condition of the buildings, most of the homes I visited were filled with personal, social, cultural and religious clues about their occupants. Most were also filled with vibrant colours, mementos, belongings, beloved pets and human warmth and spirit.

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Hope for a Cherry Blossom
Bulgaria
By Transterra Editor
28 Feb 2013

Hope for a Cherry Blossom is a documentary photo-project, focused on a Roma woman, Vishna (Cherry in Bulgarian), a resident of Blagoevgrad, Bulgaria. The project was continued throughout spring 2013. The project illustrated her daily life, work, house chores, family dynamics and everyday life in Roma community. The goal of the project was to explore life of the Roma through the story of Vishna, a mother of twelve children, who recently lost her husband to alcoholism. The question I raised was the difficulties of being a minority member and a single mother. The project aimed to bring understanding of problems an unprivileged minority group faces in Bulgaria.

I met Vishna, 42, in the church. It was a life changing encounter. What I remember from that day are her smile and hospitality (she invited me to her house), and I think these are one of her strongest character features.

Her home is a one-room shack on top of the mountain, home to the Roma community in Blagoevgrad. Just like most of the houses at the Roma district, Tsyganski makhala, as local people call it, there are no running water, no refrigerator and no place to cook at Vishna’s home, except the wood burning stove that keeps the family warm in winter. This doubles as Vishna’s cooking stove. To make it work, she collects or buys wood. The roof is damaged, it leaks when it rains.
It was raining on the day we met, so Vishna put some plates on the bed to prevent it from getting soaked. But she is used to this way of living. Vishna is not a Blagoevgrad native; she comes from Sandanski, where the Roma lifestyle differs from the one in Blagoevgrad. If in Blagoevgrad it is a rare case when Roma goes to school, in Sandanski the majority studies, only a few beg on the streets.

The same applies to Vishna’s nieces and nephews.

Vishna herself though never went to school, but her brothers did, for a while. Together with her siblings, she worked on a tobacco farm when she was a child.

Her three brothers served in the Bulgarian army and married at age 21, except her younger brother who married at 18. Vishna, however, married when she was only 13. She was kidnapped and brought to Blagoevgrad by her husband, Emil. Her parents were against, but she was already pregnant.

Today Vishna has twelve children and ten grandchildren. The oldest kid is Yuli, 27, he is married. Many years ago he moved to Gotse Delchev, where he works as a DJ. The youngest is Vasko, 3. In the beginning of 2013, Vishna learned that Vasko had leukemia. Vasko lived at the orphanage under medical control, but in May 2013 he got back home. Doctors explained to Vishna that Vasko got better and there is no need for him to keep the treatment. Her other son, Mitko, 5, is deaf. Two years ago, he had a surgery, but still he cannot hear well and therefore does not speak at all. Four other kids go to the boarding school where they stay on the weekdays. Some of the older children completed the elementary school. Now they are married and live in Blagoevgrad.

Since marrying, Vishna works as a street sweeper. Her monthly salary is around 300 BGN (200 USD). Unlike Vishna, her husband worked only one year in his life as security at a restaurant. Vishna never understood Blagoevgrad Roma, their segregated life and poor living conditions. She wanted to go back to Sandanski, but her husband kept pulling her back to Blagoevgrad.

Last several months were difficult for Vishna. She lost her husband to alcohol addiction. Soon she will get the probation from the court for her husband’s business (he used to send their kids to beg). Now Vishna’s children go to the boarding school. Her daughter Asya, 14, gave a birth to a child with mental problems. Even though Asya is married, Vishna is responsible for both of them.

Today, Vishna does not think of going back to Sandanski. She looks for opportunities in Blagoevgrad. She hopes of a better life for herself and her children. Even though Vishna struggles, she does not show her emotions and tries her best to support her family. Vishna dreams of a new house with all the necessities, getting her kids educated and having enough money to support them.

Written and photographed by Mayya Kelova

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Patiently Waiting for Syria in Zaatari
Jordan
By Transterra Editor
20 Nov 2013

Samir, father of eight, spent seven years in the Syrian Army only to be shot in the front of his home in front of his family for asking Syrian soldiers why they were questioning him. He is now living with the bullet lodged inches away from his spine making the left side of his body inactive. Samir, has lived with his family and relatives in the Zaatari Refugee Camp in Mafraq, Jordan for five months. He continues to wait for calls from other family members that are still caught between the fighting inside their hometown of Darra, Syria. The calls come at night and Samir sends family members to the gates of the camp to watch as newly arrived refugees by the hundreds sometimes thousands pour off the buses in hope of finding their loved ones. " I am hopeful to leave soon and see my wonderful country once again," he said as he passes his one year old daughter to his eldest daughter to feed and continued, " All I can do is hope and pray this will end soon,". I stayed with Samir and his family on and off throughout the course of four months documenting life inside Zaatari Refugee camp for Samir and his family.

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Activists Struggle to Save Skouries
Lerissos, Greece
By Transterra Editor
26 May 2013

In the birthplace of the ancient philosopher Aristotle, a popular movement fight against the aperture of a new gold mine in the Skouries forest, owned by El Dorado Gold, a canadian company. In Halkidiki region, in the north of Greece, El Dorado is planning to build a combination of open-pit and underground gold mines, linked to its existing Stratoni lead-zinc mine.

In December 2003, the Cassandra Mine assets of TVX Hellas S.A. in the Halkidiki peninsula were transferred by law to the Greek State for 11 million euros. They were sold the same day to Hellas Gold S.A. for the same price, without any economic assessment of the assets or an open competition.

According to Greek mining regulations, the company has full possession of the minerals contained in the concessions granted and there are no royalties payable to the State – providing little economic security to the region or the State. Due to current political instability in Greece and the accompanying state-wide austerity measures, Greek authorities have displayed little tolerance for displays of opposition from citizens in the region.

At the end of October 2013, the movement was accused to be "a criminal organization" after tapping journalists and activists.

Photos and Text by Michele Lapini

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Explosions near the Iranian Embassy i...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
19 Nov 2013

There were at least 20 dead, after an explosion occurred near a building belonging to the Iranian Embassy in the southern suburbs of the Lebanese capital of Beirut, this morning, Tuesday, 19-11-2013

Photos by Nour Naser

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Explosions near the Iranian Embassy i...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
19 Nov 2013

There were at least 20 dead, after an explosion occurred near a building belonging to the Iranian Embassy in the southern suburbs of the Lebanese capital of Beirut, this morning, Tuesday, 19-11-2013

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Explosion near the Iranian Embassy in...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
19 Nov 2013

There were at least 20 dead, after an explosion occurred near a building belonging to the Iranian Embassy in the southern suburbs of the Lebanese capital of Beirut, this morning, Tuesday, 19-11-2013

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Twin explosions in Beirut Near Irania...
Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
17 Nov 2013

At least 23 people were killed and more than 145 injured in two explosions that ripped through Beirut's neighborhood of Bir Hassan, near the Iranian embassy. The cultural attaché for the Iranian embassy, Sheikh Ibrahim Ansari, was among those killed. Abdullah Azzam Brigades, an al-Qaeda-linked group, has claimed responsibility for the attack.

Photos by Hussein Baydoun

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On Demand News
World Wide
By Transterra Editor
27 Nov 2013

One of the most innovative parts of Transterra Media is our On-Demand News™ model. This new model is an ongoing working relationship between media outlets and Transterra Media in which we produce a set number of video or photo stories for our publishers at a set price, on a continuous and ongoing basis.

Using a framework of production and editorial standards, based upon our buyer's specific needs, we utilize our extensive network of journalists to regularly produce professional, in-depth content from across the globe.

You can integrate your newsroom with TTM by contacting our sales team at [email protected], or calling us at +961 1 442 001, +961 1 567 652 or +961 1 568 652. Our sales team will discuss your needs, acquire your production and editorial standards, and reach an agreement with you on production and price. Once these details are finalized we will begin producing content for you.

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Cursed Skin: Albinism in Tanzania
Tanzania
By Transterra Editor
30 Jun 2011

Before you reach the end of this year, about 60 people would have been killed with a panga or machete. It is a blade about 110 cm long, originally used by farmers to clear the field. Remote villages, inaccessible regions near Lake Victoria, is a place for fishing and mining in East Africa. In this region, albinos have a price on their head.

Their social status is even worse than the lowest castes of Indian culture. With limited access to education, no chance of getting a decent job, they are condemned to live in their communities plagued by a social stigma. They are marginalized in society and are the perfect prey for gangs who know what each part of their bodies, hair, blood, flesh, bones, and skin, will be worth to witch doctors who use them as ingredients to perform black magic.

Their condition forces them to stay hidden for health and safety reasons, because long exposures to the sun and the lack of melanin in their skin often leads to serious types of skin cancer. Any place that is adequately dark can be a good place to hide if one is born with the misfortune of being albino in East Africa.

Ironically, Al Shayma Kwegir, the first albino in parliament in Tanzania, says the opposite. She believes that the rest of the albinos and herself need to be seen and accepted in society. On the streets of Dar es Salaam, the situation is almost normal. Nothing special, apart from poverty and social exclusion. A law passed by the government prohibits discrimination of albinos for their condition. However, few albinos are called by their own name. "Zero-zero", "ghost" or "Money, Money", is some of the few nicknames they are given in relation to the large sums of money that one can receive from the mafia in exchange for their body parts. They are nothing to society.

Photos and text by : David Rengel and Alvaro Laiz.

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The Three Gems of the Buddha
Myanmar
By Transterra Editor
11 Nov 2013

In August 2012 the rioting began. Fueled by religious extremists and invisible politicians with murky motives, arson spread to every major city in Myanmar.

In the beginning the lynching of three Muslims in the country's most westerly state sparked cycles of revenge attacks between it's two inhabiting ethnic groups, the native Buddhists and the Muslim Rohingya, descendents of immigrant Bangladeshi sherpas working for British colonialists. A dawn-to-dusk curfew was enforced by martial law, the streets desolate with shutters pulled low over the normally bustling markets. Workers stopped turning up for work and at night they defended their villages from creeping arsonists. Acres of downtown turned to blackened wastelands, whole blocks of wooden houses reduced to ash. Possessions and the skeletons of livestock lay amongst the fallen rubble where they were left, and orphanages filled with abandoned children.

Since, targets have widened to include anyone of Muslim faith in Myanmar. In cities like Sittwe, Meikhtila, Mandalay, and Lashio the attacks follow a similar pattern, an individual racist attack, a lynching in response, followed by cycles of revenge attacks from both sides. Houses are burnt, hundreds die, and thousands are left homeless. Muslims being the minority, accounting for only 5% of the country's population, always come off worse. They are no longer allowed to vote, travel, or hold positions within the government services.

Now the military struggles to contain and downplay the violence, President U Thein Sein admits the country's push for democracy is jeopardized, complicating the idea of budding democracy amongst peaceful Buddhists.

In Burmese markets, luminous “969” stickers tell Buddhists where to spend their money. Rows of stalls proudly display the logo; tyre shops, jade booths, hotels, betel carts and pharmacies. But this is not a method of religious inclusion, it's a ploy to keep Muslims out. An aggressive nationalistic movement, of which Buddhist monk Wirathu is figurehead.

Wirathu was released from prison in 2011, after serving seven years for inciting religious violence. He was released under a government amnesty program.

"Muslims are only well behaved when they are weak, "said Wirathu in an interview with the Global Post. "When they become strong, they are like a wolf or a jackal; in large packs they hunt down other animals."

The number 969 is taken from the Buddhist texts, where each number relates to an aspect of the religion - Buddha, Dhamma (teachings), and Sanga (monks) – the Three Gems of Buddhism. But under the peaceful umbrella of promoting trade between Buddhists and protecting their cultural identity, the 969 are segregating faith and commerce, undermining religious relations, and driving a wedge with continued violence. But the movement's roots grow into something much more sinister, the beginnings of genocidal thinking, and right wing nationalism.

Photos by Spike Johnson

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The Games of the Countryside Children
Iraq
By Transterra Editor
10 Nov 2013

My project is about Kurdistan countryside children. For my work I selected a few villages among more than 3000. I want to show how these children play with dust, mud, sewer, broken objects and rusty things. Their lives are repetitive and they are deprived from modern necessary equipment and toys.

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Shemsy's National Circus School of Mo...
Sale, Morocco
By Transterra Editor
10 Nov 2013

The Salé surburb Kasbah des Gnaouas, is home to the National Circus School of Morocco. Initially started as a social project to take homeless kids out of the street to educate them in exchange of teaching them the arts of the circus, it gained national recognition status due to its success.

The site where it is located further suggests that this is a unique circus school: Kasbah des Gnaouas occupies a seventeenth century fort, damaged by wind and water. This creates a very beautiful environment for students to practice stunts, with a background of contrasting tones and other walls riddled with deep wounds that cross from side to side, and very blue sky above.

The young people training at the circus are even more special than the circus or its surroundings. Their fate could be like so many marginalized homeless children of Morocco , who only seem to await cheaper drugs, unemployment, prostitution and crime. This project has given them the opportunity for education and practice an activity in a fun way, which will open the doors of the world to them.

"When I introduce myself to other guys, I get the impression that I'm showing what I can do , that I'm like them and now I see myself almost flying, doing complicated acrobatic exercises on the web," says Fatima Fannane, a charismatic student 18-year-old.

In many developing countries with difficulties, such as Morocco, the challenge is not only to create opportunities for young people, but to convince them that it's worth taking these opportunities. Shemsy's Circus School has acquired a reputation for playing an important role in Sidi Moussa, the poor neighborhood where it sits, and Salé, the Siamese city to national capital, Rabat. It is only one of the centers that was established by the Moroccan Association for Aid to children in distressed Situations ( Amesip ) , but it has become his ship emblem.

"Everyone likes it and it attracts many people" says Touraya Bouabid, founder and president of Amesip, continuing, "and the young artists are now role models to other young people like them."

Text By Témoris Grecko / Salé, Morocco
Photos by Joelle Gueguen

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Kala Azar- Black Fever
Hajipur, India
By Transterra Editor
08 Nov 2013

Known as the disease of the poor, Kala Azar affects millions of people in the world. In Bihar, located in the north-east region of India Doctors without Borders have treated 8,000 patients of Kala Azar in the recent years.

The disease Leishmaniasis is transmitted by the bites of certain kinds of sandflies and is considered to be one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in the world. The severe form of Leishmaniasis is known as Kala Azar (Black fever in Hindi).Most people who suffer Kala Azar in this region often live in remote locations, and rarely go to a health center and they can't afford private doctors or transportation to government hospitals.

The co-infection with TB and HIV/AIDS worsens the situation of the infected person with Kala Azar and their treatment becomes more complex. When people infected with Kala Azar reach Hajipur Sadar Hospital in Bihar, they suffer from many discomforts such as high fever, anemia, and have become very weak due to the disease.

Left untreated, Kala Azar almost always leads to the death of the patient. Since the disease is globally neglected, access to affordable medicine and proper care is very limited. Many of the infected patients can't afford treatment; that is highly invasive and needs proper laboratories and trained physicians to complete.

Photos and Text by David Rengel

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Cabaret Dreams
Lopburi, Thailand
By Transterra Editor
06 Nov 2013

These three teenagers prepare themselves for a cabaret show that they will perform at their school in Lopburi Province in Thailand.

All three boys have felt “female inside” as long as they can remember. After they finish high school, they say they want to become cabaret stars.

Thai society has had an open understanding of homosexuality for centuries. Thais believe that sex isn’t binary. “Ladyboys” or kathoeys are recognized as a third gender and it is accepted that although they are born biologically male, they will feel female and will probably chose to live their lives as females. In Thailand, sexual orientation is commonly believed to be genetically determined and has never been considered a mental or physical drawback. Thailand has never had legal prohibitions against homosexuality or homosexual behavior. Kathoeys have long been part of Thai culture and they continue to play an important role in Thai popular entertainment, television shows, sports and nightclub performances.

However, the law has only recently begun to address the legal rights of transgender people in Thailand. Until recently, legal recognition of kathoeys was non-existent in Thailand - even if transsexuals have had genital reassignment surgery, they were not allowed to change their legal sex. In 2007, the Thai national assembly debated allowing transgendered people to legally change their name, after having a sex change operation. Kathoeys currently face many social and legal restrictions. Families (and especially fathers) are typically disappointed if a son becomes a kathoey. Other than in some predominantly female occupations, Kathoeys often face discrimination in employment. Transgender males to females usually work in traditionally female dominated occupations such as in shops, restaurants, in beauty salons and in factories. They also work in entertainment and tourist centers and as sex workers.

Despite these significant difficulties, the outlook for most transgender people in Thailand is quite positive. Most of the Thai transgender photographic stories I've seen to date have tended to concentrate more on kathoeys who turned desperately to prostitution because their poverty and lack of education left them unable to survive any other way. I feel it’s a shame to concentrate on these extreme cases when it doesn’t represent the situation of most Thai transgender people. I hope, by telling this story, I can help a little to redress the balance of this perception.

Photos by Alison McCauley

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Shadows of Silk
Surin
By Transterra Editor
30 Apr 2013

Surin is located in the rural east of Thailand, in the province Isaan. Agriculture, the main industry of the region, was once supplemented by sericulture. Such an arrangement was making the households self-sufficient, ensuring food on the table and shirts on one’s back. My host, Pimnipa, used to grow and weave silk herself, but two years ago an extremely hot summer killed all her silkworms putting her out of business. Subsequently, she had to abandon her loom. The raw silk-thread is not easy to get and the prices went up, as only few suppliers managed to survive. Pimnipa is my guide to what remains of the local silk industry. She takes me under the roofs of the sparse houses that are still involved in silk-making, so that I can learn about the process. Several years ago each household was self-reliant but today people had to specialize to get by. Those who grow silk, usually don’t weave, and those who dye thread, don’t rear the worms and so on. It’s not a solvent business anymore. Nowadays, the climate change and the low profitability also top the reasons for the widespread reluctance to invest in sericulture. It takes both, time and patience. Silkworms are voracious eaters, and yet they're extremely fragile and vulnerable to insects, noises or heat. Recent very hot summers resulting in hundreds of baskets full of dead caterpillars left a large hole in the finances of many villagers. Like in Pimnipa’s case, those baskets were then put aside never to be looked at again. Each handmade silk cloth is unique and easily recognizable because of its irregularities and occasional knots. The patterns are often a signature of the village or even a family, secretly guarded for generations. In spite of its beauty, the handmade silk attracts less and less buyers every year. Due to the time and labor required to make a piece of fabric, this product is not cheap. Since the markets are overflowing with cheap factory-made silk from China, small looms struggle with distribution. A loom on the porch was once a sight as common as a buffalo in the Surin villages. Today more often one can see those tools in the far corner of the backyards, like sad decaying carcasses of the by-gone self-sufficiency. But there are a couple areas where the hand-woven silk brings great returns. Ban Thasawang is one such village, a place of great renown as it produces the silk for the Royal Family itself. The less fortunate weavers are mostly Pimnipa’s age or older. Their daughters and granddaughters are unlikely to learn the craft. The youth flees from the villages to the cities, and even if they remain, they indulge in far more “sophisticated” pastimes like watching TV or taking drugs. The household silk production, a vehicle for women empowerment and a source of their pride, is in the hands of the passing generation. And without a rescue plan they may die alongside. Photos by Gloria Kurnik

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Sangmanee: Muay Thai's New Promise
Bangkok, Thailand
By Transterra Editor
06 Jun 2013

Sangmanee began to fight when he was just a kid to escape the poverty of rural Thailand. At just 16 years has become the golden boy of Muay Thai and possibly he will represent his country at the 2016 Olympic Games.

The life of the Sangmaee’s parents was not easy working in the field and his father fought in the Muay Thai’s fights to earn extra money. Sangmanee 's father did not have a special reputation as a boxer, but had managed to knock over a hundred opponents, and most importantly, to Sangmanee he was like a hero and dreamed up one day to the ring to fight like him.

Sangmanee’s father started training him when he was just six years old and opened a small gym on the farm to make him a true Muay Thai fighter. A few months later his father gotta pay the entrance of a second hand bike to take hin to his first fights, but they used to come home sick and exhausted after traveling many miles to go to the fighting.

Sangmanee was aware of the efforts he was making his father to give him a better future awaited him working the land in the farm, therefore, when he turned 11 and he was more tanned in the fighting, grateful for all the support he said to his father: "You want a car or a house ? I 'll get fighting”.

Uploaded on the bike with his father, Sangmanee toured the provinces of Thailand to go to his first fights and soon managed to win twelve fights and just one defeat. Sangmanee had become invincible child who pull the strings in the Muay Thai soon notice him.

When Sangmanee turned 15 years old the family was packing to go live with him to Bangkok, where they don't need more land tilling or moving with the motorcycle to go to the fighting, Sangmanee now trains in one of the most importants gyms of Bangkok where he has a room that he shares with his parents and a ring where his father still training him. He don’t have to worry about money because his manager, a Thai policeman, bears all costs and he has become the golden boy of Muay Thai who probably will represent his country in the 2016 Olympic Games.

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Single Mothers in Morocco - With you ...
Marakesh, Morocco
By Transterra Editor
13 Jul 2013

In Morocco single mothers are still rejected from society for having a child out of wedlock. According to INSAF, 153 children are born outside of wedlock every day with an estimate of 24 being abandoned. Following the Arab Spring in 2011, a new Moroccan constitution was created. This constitution included long-awaited amendments on women’s rights.

In practice, this hasn’t changed much. Unexpected pregnancies are mostly happening in rural areas or poor town districts. In April 2013, I witnessed Loubna and Samira’s own experiences. Loubna who’s 32 years old, from the countryside near Marrakesh lost vision in one eye when she was a toddler. This incident left her with little hope to marry. She became pregnant after meeting someone who eventually left her. She is currently raising her son alone. Samira (31) was brought up in a Marrakesh slum. She lost her father at the age of 13, and her sister is currently in prison. The father of her son left them both when she gave birth to their son. She is currently struggling to make ends meet and constantly lives in a state of stress.

Produced within the framework of Reporting Change- Worldpress Photo 2013
*INSAF- Institution Nationale de Solidarité avec les Femmes en Détresse * Names have been changed to preserve identity.

Photos and Text by Joelle Gueguen

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Commercial Port and Politics Clash in...
Sidon, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
05 Oct 2013

There is a new commercial port in construction in Saida, Lebanon. This port has affected the profits of local fishermen and the union they are in has different opinions of how to handle the situation, especially when it comes to the financial distribution of funds.

Photos and Text by Kaylyn Hlavaty

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Battles between the Islamists and the...
Syria
By Transterra Editor
01 Sep 2013

Attacks by jihadists from Jabhat Al-Nusra and the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) against the Kurdish population in Northern Syria have made it difficult for ordinary Kurds to flee to neighboring Turkey. The PYG, the military wing of the PYD (Partiya Yekîtiya Demokrat), is officially responsible for the safety of the Kurdish province of Al-Hasakah and has been under attack by Islamists from 2012. Since there is no official border crossing open at the moment, the journey to safety for the elderly, the sick and children is near impossible.

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Kish Island, Iran
Iran
By Transterra Editor
03 Oct 2013

Kish Island, Iran

Kish is a 91.5 square kilometer island in Iran. Since it has a free trade zone status, it is touted as a consumer's paradise: with numerous malls, shopping centers, tourist attractions, and resort hotels. It has an estimated population of 20,000 residents and about 1 million people visit the island annually. Kish Island was ranked among the world’s 10 most beautiful islands by The New York Times in 2010, and is the fourth most visited vacation destination in Southwest Asia after Dubai, U.A.E, and Sharm el-Sheikh.

In the 1970s the last Shah of Iran turned the island into a luxury resort for the international elite complete with a Grand Casino and an airport designed to handle the Concorde. After the Islamic Revolution, Kish Island became a duty-free shopping center.

Due to its natural attractions, pleasant weather more than seven months a year, and several recreational and sports centers; today the island has turned into a favorite tourism destination in Iran and the region.

Leila Moltaji, an Iranian woman from Tehran, is visiting the island with 5 friends. She said "The island is a place for us to relax. The island is so beautiful and we can relax a bit more here than in Tehran. Here the police is not that strict.”

Kish has a variety of tourist attractions that can be of much interest to a wide category of tourists. Its untapped nature, beautiful beaches and green areas, alongside the clear azure waters of the Persian Gulf have created a unique combination.

Sarah Ahmadi, 24 year old Iranian woman from Shiraz, is at Kish Island with her sister and mother. "Compared to Shiraz, the roads are new, clean and the cares drive safely" she commented on Kish Island. On why Kish Island is so different from the rest of Iran, she didn't really know, but noted that the way of life on Kish is closer to what Iranians really want.

Senior Iranian government workers including governors are frequently coming to Kish Island. An extensive plan for Kish Island until 2025 has been finalized.

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Mr. Handsome Competition 2013
Kathmandu
By Transterra Editor
02 Nov 2013

First gay males' Mr. Handsome competition in Nepal
The contestants are coming out, one at a time, wearing only jeans, neckties and cowboy hats. Some are a little stiff. Clearly nervous. But they have a reason to be nervous: They are participating in the first gay beauty pageant: Mr. Handsome, the first of its kind in Nepal. Some are coming out to families and friends by participating here. As the minutes pass, the participants become more and more confident, like they have been out their whole life and have performed many times. They show their moves, facing hundreds of spectators, parents and well-wishers, and they smile.

Homosexuality has been legal in Nepal since 2008, which is one of the most liberal Asian countries, but contestant tell stories of being abused and thrown in jail. In Nepal, homosexuality is often seen as a product of reincarnation and thereby a punishment for poor choices in a former life and same-sex marriage is seen as an import from Western and European culture.

The Mr. Handsome pageant was hosted by the Blue Diamond Society (BDS), Nepalese NGO focusing on LGBT awareness activities, as a way to fight discrimination across the country on the 2 of November 2013. The NGO asked for contestants through its 40-something offices and was ecstatic when they received 35 entry applications. They had expected none.

Prim Pakrim, 22 is one of the contestants, is from Kathmandu. When asked why he's decided to attend the pageant he said “because I’m gay and I'm happy being gay." His family is aware that he is gay but he thinks a beauty pageant like Mr. Handsome can change people's views on gay people and will hopefully end the discrimination gays are facing in the country.

Anup Shrestha, one of the runner ups, from Chitwan, is extremely happy for his prize. He is coming out as being gay by being a part of this competition. He said: “We are intelligent, and we are happy to be gay," and added “There are hundreds of people like us living in Nepal. It´s a wonderful life and we can´t hide it any more” He is now ready to face his family and all the questions that come along with his coming out.

On the stage the contestants are asked what they would say to a headmaster who, as many is currently doing in Nepal, is refusing gays access education. Biswo Raj Adhikari answered, “Every gay and lesbian should have equal rights to education. They should not be isolated or discriminated for their natural identity because being gay or lesbian is not a disease but a feeling.”

Sunil Babu Pant, BDS president, said: "This programme has encouraged gay men to reveal their hidden talents and will create more awareness about gender and sexuality” and added "Although treatment of gays has improved in recent years, many are still not willing to come out openly.” Sunil hopes the competition will become an annual event.

The country’s new constitution is expected to define marriage as a union between two adults, regardless of gender, and to outlaw discrimination based on sexual orientation.

Photos and Text by Ulrik Pedersen

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Helping the Syrian Refugees
turkey
By Transterra Editor
01 Nov 2013

UNICEF's assistance to the Syrian children of refugees in displacement camps built on the Turkish - Syria border.

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Bread, Water, Winter, and Syrian Refu...
syria
By Transterra Editor
01 Nov 2013

The suffering of displaced Syrians is palpable in refugee camps. People lack the basic necessities of life, and their concerns are mounting with the advent of winter.

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Bread, Water, Winter, and Syrian Refu...
syria
By Transterra Editor
01 Nov 2013

The suffering of displaced Syrians is palpable in refugee camps. People lack the basic necessities of life, and their concerns are mounting with the advent of winter.

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Rural Bosnia & Herzegovina Struggle w...
Sarajevo
By Transterra Editor
26 Sep 2013

Almost two decades after the war in Bosnia & Herzegovina ended, the country remains threatened by more than 120,000 landmines — about 2.5 percent of the total land mass — that remain a dark legacy of the war, buried in the ground along former frontlines.

While urban areas are being largely demined, people living in the remote landside of Bosnia are permanently threatened by the hidden hazards in the ground near their homes. Relatives of landmine victims, as well as survivors, mostly do not receive any governmental help. For these people live in remote areas with high unemployment rates with no possibility of earning money for a living, the only income for most is to collect firewood or fruits in the nearby forests. Some of these families have victims spanning two or three generations.

Without help from the government, the people largely depend on the Landmine Survivors Initiative (LSI), a non-governmental institution that provides affected people and communities with psychological and financial support. In some cases the NGO provides a greenhouse, in others agricultural machines, so that people can try to make a living instead of depending on the woods for survival.

Photos and Text by Michael Biach

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Wonderland
Delta of Amacuro, Venezuela
By Transterra Editor
31 Dec 2012

The Delta of Amacuro, eastern Venezuela, is one of the most inhospitable places in the world. For the past 8.500 years ago Warao indians have turned its 20.000 km² of water canals and swamps into their home. Despite the strong acculturation they have suffered because of colonialism Warao people have managed to keep their culture and way of life deeply rooted into this environment.

Before the late 20th century, the term berdache was widely used by anthropologists been well integrated into the life of their tribes, and have often held revered and honored positions within them. Members of as a generic term to indicate “two-spirit” or transgender individuals. In Native American societies, berdaches played an important role both religiously and economically. They were given specific roles in their religion and were not expected to support their family like a male would, but rather they were required to do some of the women’s work and portray the behaviors and clothing of a woman. Early Spanish and French explorers and colonizers in North America applied these terms as a means of making sense of the relationships, anatomical sex, sexual behavior, and social gender role of those individuals they encountered who fell outside their own conceptual frameworks.

Historically, two-spirit people typically have native cultures are often quite reluctant to discuss two-spirit traditions with outsiders, who they feel may misunderstand them or appropriate them for their own agendas.The Warao, as it happens in other ethnic groups, considers certain people are not man neither woman. They are called Tida Wena. Their inclusion in warao society goes back to the pre- Columbian traditions mentioned above. Most of these beliefs were common only half a century ago but now due to the growing acculturation they are facing extintion. Deep in the swamps of Delta of Orinoco it is still possible to make out their world as it was hundred years ago. Small and isolated native communities struggle to survive there. The existance of transgender people among the warao society could be the last remains of those old pre-Columbian traditions, never photographed before.

Photos By: Alvaro Laiz

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Socioeconomic Disparity in New York City
New York City, United States of America
By Transterra Editor
09 Oct 2013

New York City is a place where economic and social differences can be seen clearly by just roaming the streets. While walking through Times Square, Harlem, 5th avenue, or any part of the city, it is easy to spot homeless people sleeping on street heaters on the floor, collecting plastic cans and bottles to resell, people begging, and the elderly doing physical jobs in order to pay their bills. The city is home for an estimated 8.3 million people from many different social and economic backgrounds. Manhattan retains the dubious distinction of having the biggest income gap of any big county in a country with the
lowest income of the lowest five percent of $9,635 compared to $398,007 for the top five percent.

In New York, immigrants of Pakistan or African-descent sell tour bus tickets to tourists, or hold store signs, while crossing paths with Wall Street bankers who make up the wealthiest portion of taxpayers in New York City. These common and underpaid jobs are a last resort for many to in order to pay their bills. Instability is rife in a city where the price of living only continues to climb.

Photos and text by Jonathan Alpeyrie.

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Funeral for Islamic Jihad Militant in...
Beit Liqya, Palestinian territories
By Transterra Editor
23 Oct 2013

Thousands filled the streets of the village of Beit Liqya, mourning the death of Islamic Jihad militant Muhammad Assi ,28, who was shot dead on Wednesday by Israeli forces near Ramallah. At the funeral, Assi was wrapped in Palestinian Islamic Jihad flags. Scores of cars followed the procession and thousands carried the body while chanting slogans calling for revenge and resistance against Israel's occupation. Islamic Jihad did confirm Assi was one of its militants. The Israeli army confirmed the incident and claimed Assi was responsible for the Tel Aviv bus bombing in November 2012 that wounded 29 people.

Photos and Text by Giuliano Camarda

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Females in Iranian Society
Iran
By Transterra Editor
10 Feb 2010

In Iran, Mitra Etemad’s father never ceased to repeat to his daughter, almost like a prayer, "Mitra, between you and your brother, there is no difference." And she believed it. Etemad, now a 40-year old woman, has learned the lesson very well. She is a force to be reckoned with in her office in Tehran where she mans the helm of a leading mining and refining company called Epic-Bik. She inspires her all-male co-workers while managing 400 employees, five mines, several factories around the country and international contracts with major oil companies throughout the world. “I wanted to prove that I could do it. Especially to my father,” Etemad says.

Mitra does not stand alone, and is one among many pioneering females in Iran, pushing societal boundaries. I met some of these women. They said that the revolution is under their veils, and they are not like how people imagine them around the world. Not one of them lives under their husbands' rules, but rather by their own idea of success.

Photos By: Linda Dorigo

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The Antechamber of Life
Lebanon Arsal
By Transterra Editor
22 Oct 2013

Arsal, a Lebanese border city with Syria, is a haven for the more than 12,000 Syrians who fled the fighting of the region of Qalamoun recently. Inside a building under construction in the small city, which today hosts more Syrians than Lebanese, the Union of Syrian Organizations of Medical Aid (UOSSM) organizes a formation on war medicine for 32 Syrian doctors and nurses every month.

In October, most of the trainees were originated from Qusayr, Syria, where they had to treat patients in clandestine clinics, hidden from the eyes of the Syrian authorities. Some were imprisoned and others tortured because they were treating civilians in secret. When the city was taken by the Syrian regime in summer 2013, they had to flee to Arsal, where they built a hospital inside of a mosque. There, they began to cure the injured from Qusayr, before being overwhelmed by the injured from the region of Qalamoun, the new epicentre of the Syrian civil war.

Between the 28th of November and the 3rd of December, half of the doctors and nurses who attended the formation were coming from Qalamoun. Some had lost their parents, other their children. But all were determined to learn the vital techniques to cure in the conditions of violence and shortage. Once trained and back in Syria, they will reproduce what they learned and train the rare doctors and nurses who still treat civilians among the ruins of Syria.

In the midst of a war where humanitarian right is seldom respected and where doctors are considered as targets by the Syrian regime, Raphaël Pitti, a former French war doctor and founder of the UOSSM, decided to organize formations of war medicine in Turkey, Syria and Lebanon, to teach to local doctors how to save lives in conditions of war. Today, 300 doctors and 350 nurses have been trained by the UOSSM. In the rebel areas of Syria, where international NGOs have no access, they remain the only people who can still save lives... at the risk of their own.

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The Basij in Iran
Iran
By Transterra Editor
21 Oct 2013

Basij is a voluntary organization in Iran with a focus on military, education and other socio-economic projects. It is affiliated with the Islamic Revolutionary Guards and is one of the public branches of this organization. Basij has millions of members; many of these members are women of different ages. It deals with and executes a lot of projects that are related to construction, and cultural and economical activities throughout the country. Many of these projects include helping the poor in deprived regions of the country, organizing religious teaching, publishing different books and magazines that have Islamic content, arranging different educational courses for the illiterate; to educate them in the fields of science and train them for arranging festivals, seminars, and plays. Basij also plays a role in holding military training that take place in Tehran and other regions of Iran. These trainings are annual and take place at the same time. This collection documents the women members of Basij participating in the training. Women may join the Basij for religious reasons or in order to have access to more benefits through the Basij and be among other women. In this training, the women learned how to shoot, what to do in the event of an explosion or a hypothetical enemy attack, and how to to deal with street outrage and riots.
Photos and text by Yalda Moaiery

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Eastleigh, the Somali Neighborhood of...
Eastleigh, Kenya
By Transterra Editor
23 Nov 2012

Eastleigh was founded in 1921. The colonial government allocated Nairobi's residential estates by race, and Eastleigh was pointed for Asians and elite Africans who worked as clerks, builders or shoemakers. Eastleigh was originally a large Kenyan Asian enclave until independence in 1963. Now Eastleigh is almost entirely inhabited by Somalis, except for a few indigenous residents. Somalis have invested heavily in the enclave, contributing over $1.5 billion in the neighborhood alone.

Eastleigh has seen many changes during the last year: first improvement of the situation in Somalia has given the chance for some Somalis to move back to Mogadishu followed by several terrorist attacks in late 2012 and lately the attack on the Westgate mall.

The attack on Westgate Mall on 21 of September has changed the situation in Eastleigh:

Shafici Mohamed Deq, Eastleigh resident, said the the main issues is now going around the failure of the Kenyan security agencies and their involvement, the Somali community is not that much in focus, and have no much worries except the Kenyan police use it as took to take bribe from illegal immigrants in Eastleigh.

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I am 220: Surviving a Migrant Boat Di...
Trapani, Italy
By Transterra Editor
11 Oct 2013

October 15, 2013
Trapani, Italy

"I am 27 years old, originally I came from Nigeria. I crossed from Libya to Italy in a small boat. 105 people went with me and 103 of them survived," said Refugee 220.

In Sicily I stumbled upon a fenced camp in the harbor town of Trapani. At this camp I met number 220. He is one of about 800 people who crossed over from Africa to Italy in the last three weeks. After the tragedy of the third of October, the sea has become a human cemetery. Number 220 is one of the lucky ones. He made it to land.

Number 220 says he was living in Libya, but the situation there drove him to attempt the crossing. He survived, but two women on his small boat died before a commercial ship took them on board. Eventually they ended up in an old gym in Trapani. He spends his days here with 85 other young men. ‘This is already better than Libya, I feel safe here and don’t hear gunshots anymore.’

The men in the gym have no idea what will happen to them. They don’t speak a word of Italian and the guards of the camp don’t speak English. They are totally in the dark about their status and tell me I am the first person to speak English to them since they arrived.

Since the guards don’t give me any information either, and won’t let me enter the camp, number 220 and me decide to meet outside the camp. Here I give him a disposable camera, so he can show me his life inside the camp. ‘I don’t do much inside, mainly sleep and sit on the patio with other guys from Nigeria. And wait.’

The quality of these analogue photos is not the best. Number 220 is not a professional photographer. But in my opinion his slightly dark, bleakly colored and out of focus photos perfectly reflect 220’s life at the moment. He lives on the edge of our society. His name is Louis. He could be a friend.

Photos and Text By:
Berta Banacloche / Jeffry Ruigendijk / Refugee 220

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Christians of Iran
Iran
By Transterra Editor
01 Jul 2011

The Islamic Republic of Iran recognizes freedom of worship for Christians. In the country the community is divided between 50.000 Armenians and 10 thousand Assyrians. Before 1979, year of the Islamic Revolution, Christians were two millions. Today they live in small towns and villages (as Urmia, Ahvaz, Pataver, Salmas) and in specific neighborhoods in large cities (such as Vanak in Tehran and Jolfa in Isfahan). Since decades the diaspora of this communities is going on to Europe and United States, perceived as rich, free and secure places. The life, public and private, of who remains is entirely within the religious community: job, public cerimonies, marriage, education. As in a ghetto.

Photos by: Linda Dorigo

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Trapani Refugees
Trapani, Italy
By Transterra Editor
12 Oct 2013

On October 3, approximately 200 African refugees arrive in Trapani, Italy, after being saved from their sinking boat in the Mediterranean. The tanker that saved them was too small to enter the port, so the refugees arrived on the "Ringhio". While the locals consider the huge influx of refugees a problem, they nevertheless provided aid for the exhausted refugees upon their arrival to the port.

Photos by: Berta Banacloche and Jeffry Ruigendijk

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L'Eroica 2013
Gaiole, Italy
By Transterra Editor
07 Oct 2013

Every year, during the first weekend of October, thousands of passionate cyclists reach Gaiole, a small village in the Italian region of Chianti, for the most famous old-style tourist cycling event in the world, the so-called "L'Eroica" ("the heroic" ).

Attracted by red wine, the famous "white road" through an amazing landscape just 15 kilometers outside the city of Siena, people from all over the world share their passion for cycling. This year, more than 5.400 participants dived into the past to enjoy the unique atmosphere of the race: old-fashioned clothes, dirty wheels and vintage bikes.

Four different routes with distances between 35 and 200 km wind through the vineyards of Val d'Orcia and Chianti, surrounded by wild animals and the true spirit of cycling. This unique event, the biggest in Italy and one of the most important in the world knows only few rules: only vintage bikes and instead of competition the true spirit of "L'Eroica": a genuine passion for cycling, nature and food.

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The state of Schools in Pakistan Admi...
Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Muzaffarabad
By Transterra Editor
07 Oct 2013

Around 29,000 schools were decimated by an earthquake that hit a large part of northern Pakistan in 2005. The government failed to reconstruct those schools even after 7 years, risking the lives of thousands of children who are forced to take lessons under the open sky in a harsh climate. The government claims that it faces a shortage of funds to rebuild decimated schools while on the other hand, critics of government say most funds provided by the international community have been misappropriated.

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Spiral Galaxy, the Milky Way Unravelled
Netherlands
By Transterra Editor
07 Oct 2013

It took centuries of searching, years of waiting, months of observing and weeks of calculating. For the very first time in human history a group of scientists looks at a map: the first map of our Galaxy, our Island in the Universe. These scientists are some of the top Dutch astronomers. And the map is the result of an extraordinary prediction, cutting-edge technological development and a lot of persistence. Spiral Galaxy, the Milky Way unravelled, highlights the huge contribution of Dutch scientists between 1886 and 1955 to a new view of our Universe. A view where man, Earth and Sun are no longer at the centre of everything.
By: Lightcurve Films

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Teenager from Revolution
Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
07 Oct 2013

00:00-11:40

My name is Ziad Saieed, and I’m 15 years old. I’m in the last year in elementary school. I
live in the 5th of May. I like music and photography, and I play Guitar, I was supporting
Hamdeen Sabahy. I used to talk to the people about the candidates but I did not
necessarily convince them, just make them understand the disadvantages of a
candidate so that they know who they want to vote for. Some people don’t have
awareness as they were choosing between Shafiq and Sabahy. And there is no point of
comparison between them. I believe that most people who voted for Shafiq didn’t hear
him talk. They just heard him saying that he will restore law and order within 24 hours.

I wasn’t really convinced with Hamdeen Sabahy, but I used to tell myself that he was
the best of the worst. I was supporting Baradei at first but after his withdrawal, and as
I wasn’t for boycotting the elections, so I supported Hamdeen. I think that Shafiq will
reproduce the old regime and will form a new National Democratic Party with new
members, and Morsy belongs to the group of Muslim Brotherhood, he claims that he
will leave his position in the group if he wins the elections, but I think that it’s not true
and that he will still be taking his order from The Guidance Bureau. After the issuing of
constitutional declaration by SCAF, they strip the president of any authority over the
country. So whether the next president is Morsy or Shafiq, both will be powerless.

I decided to boycott the elections in the second round as I know that Shafiq would
forge the elections, and I thought that Shafiq will win the elections by forging but when
I heard that it was Morsy who won, I was surprised and I thought maybe there is a
plot going on between the Muslim brotherhood and SCAF, in which SCAF dissolves the
parliament and give them the presidency in return, or maybe they were just avoiding a
second revolution by the people if Shafiq won the elections. So maybe they thought of
dissolving the parliament in order to place all the legislative and the executive powers in
their hands and write the constitution, and allow Morsy to win the elections to win the
people. In that case Morsy would have no power over them as all the power is in their
hands.

I really liked Baradei’s program but I didn’t like his plan for Education very much as he
wanted to charge studying at the universities. That won’t be good as most of the people
are poor in Egypt. I don’t like that he is not very brave and that he doesn’t go out to
Tahrir Square much with us like Hamdeen Sabahy and Khalid Ali.

I used to go out in protests when I heard that people were getting arrested or beaten.
I participated in “No to Military Trail” campaign and in “Kazeboon’s”-Lairs- marches. I
don’t like when people yell and I don’t like to get into a conflict with them. I think those
people don’t want to know the truth. I chose to participate in “No to Military Trail”
and “Kazeboon’s”-Lairs-Campaigns as there were fighting for two important issues,
there were 12,000 civilians in military prisons and many of them are people who have nothing to do with the revolution, they once arrested a guy who was going back home
from his work during the curfew, when he was insulted by an officer and just because he
asked him not to insult him, they arrested him. Even if they were thugs, they shouldn’t
be facing military trails, as they’re civilians. There are some guys at the age of 14 and
they were convicted by unfair military trails and sentenced many years of prison. Most
people who were sentenced in military trails are the revolutionaries.

I see the future of this country will be like Syria’s if Shafiq won the elections because
revolution will continue and there will be massacres. Shafiq already threatens and said
that Abbassiyya was just a trial. So he will make a war. The thing is we are a stubborn
people, so we will never stop even if they kill us. If Morsy came as a president with the
legislative and the executive power, he would’ve trailed the military, but now they have
all the power and they’re safe and they made Morsy win the elections to absorb some
of people's anger.

I don’t think it has anything to go with your age, it’s about the dream we want to realize
for our country. Most guys in my age think of hanging out, play station and the internet
and there are some who do all that but still go out to the Square and protest and they
have something to do with the Revolution and they’re fighting for their rights, and
there are some who will soon participate. I believe we grow up as we witnessed the
Revolution. We will never forget that there was a Revolution which toppled the old
regime, or the head of the regime, and still the Revolution continues. So we will always
be thinking of getting our rights as we did it once and we can do it again. We are not
supposed to be demanding these rights. This is something that should be ours, a right in
education, medical care and housing. Only people, who have money, get medical care
in the hospitals, those who don’t have money die. The country should provide medical
care for people with no money, not for rich people, like ministers and actors, with all my
respect but those people are rich, the country spend a lot of money to cure people like
Suzan Mubarak.

Many people at the age of 17 are thinking of moving out from Egypt and travelling
abroad, and the main cause of that is the former regime, they can see the situation of
others who graduated and can’t find a job or work in a different field like a guy who
study to be an engineer and find himself a taxi driver, I have no problem that he is a
taxi driver but I think everyone should work in their fields. I want to travel to see other
countries but I don’t want to immigrate. I really want to go to Sweden for a visit, for 2
weeks or something. Well, if I was thinking of immigrating, why am I fighting here then
right now? We can’t demand change and then leave the country. It’s not reasonable!

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Syria Today by Hamza Abozeid
Syria
By Transterra Editor
07 Oct 2013

Photos of Syria covering Maskah and Ar Raqqah

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October 6th Protests
Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
07 Oct 2013

Thousands of protestors took to the street on October 6th not only to commemorate the war against Israel, but many were also calling for the ouster of General Sisi.
By: Leyland Cecco

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Sulfur Mines at Kawah Ijen Indonesia
Kawah Ijen, Indonesia
By Transterra Editor
04 Oct 2013

In the remote East Java, Indonesia lies the ominous Kawah Ijen volcano, topped with an immense crater and a 200-meter-deep lake of sulfuric acid. It is within this precarious work environment where miners spend their days, hacking chunks of cooled sulfur with steel bars and ferrying up and down the mountain twin basket loads that weigh between 130 and 220 pounds. As they break up sulfur, they are perpetually engulfed in a cloud of smoke. Respiratory issues are rife among the workers because of this, who brave their surroundings with minimal to no protection. There is little pay-off for this sacrifice, as the daily earnings range from a mere $8 - $12. Gloves and gas masks are an unaffordable luxury.

An active vent at the edge of the lake is a source of elemental sulphur, and is what supports the mining operation. Escaping volcanic gases are channelled through a network of ceramic pipes, which causes the condensation of molten sulfur. The sulfur, which is deep red in colour when molten, pours slowly from the ends of these pipes and pools on the ground, turning bright yellow as it cools. It is this sulfur that keeps the miners returning every day despite the danger posed to their health, desperate to make a living.

Photos By: Jeffrey Bright

Click on the link below to view more photos:
http://www.transterramedia.com/collections/1452

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Occupation Has No Future
Israel
By Transterra Editor
04 Oct 2013

This film covers the character of Israeli occupation of Palestine. Documenting opinions not usually revealed from both Israelis and Palestinians. A behind the scenes look into how militarism and occupation is implemented in the mindsets of Israeli citizens at a young age. Powerful interviews with Israelis who were once soldiers that are now anti occupation and Palestinians who give personal accounts of life inside the occupation.
By: Upheaval Productions

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Registered Dangerous Trailer
Egypt
By Transterra Editor
04 Oct 2013

A trailer for Registered Dangerous, a one hour documentary about the criminal underclass in Egypt.
By: Khalil Raof

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If You Eat Garlic, You Will Get Full
Heraat, Afghanistan
By Transterra Editor
04 Oct 2013

This film features the miserable life of a group of children in the western city of the Heraat province of Afghanistan by showing their work on the streets of the city.

More importantly, it shows the ill behavior of the residents of the city toward these kids. The film shows how they are treated as outcasts in the society, with people not allowing them in the sports fields, shops, and so on.

The film is ten minutes long.
By: Sara Keawal

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Inconvenient to all, West Bank Bedouins
West Bank, Israel
By Transterra Editor
03 Oct 2013

The Arab al-Jahalin is the biggest bedouin community that lives in the West Bank Area called E-1, part of the Area C, where Israel retains control over security as well as planning and zoning, and holds strategic significance for further expansion of illegal Israeli settlements, approved by the last Israeli government even if they are considered illegal by International laws. Following the 1948 conflict, the majority of the Negev Bedouin were forcibly evicted from their ancestral lands in the Negev by the Israeli authorities. Clans from five of the Negev tribes subsequently moved to the West Bank and registered as refugees with UNRWA. Forced to abandon nomadism and become permanent, the Palestinian Bedouin living in the Jerusalem periphery are now in a very poor, dramatic and emergency situation. In the last 15 years the Bedouin communities have been subject to demolition, requisition of cattle, attacks by settlers, aimed to get away from the area.
But despite this, the communities have shown determination and unbelievable resilience, who led the Israeli military authorities to draw up a "plan of relocation" so-called Nuweimeh Plan, which seeks to solve the ‘Bedouin problem’ by relocating the approximately 2300 Bedouins of the E1-zone to a town named Nuweimeh near Jericho. The lands of Nuweimeh, however is unsuitable for the animals to graze, and in addition there is no job opportunities, which is why the Bedouins who already are settled there live almost solely on UN food parcels. By the other side, the Palestinian Authorities do not provide any significant support to these communities, which are considered as a second class population.

By: Giuliano Camarda

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Radio Beirut Hip-Hop Lebanon
Beirut Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
03 Oct 2013

Radio Beirut is a platform for an open mike session with a Hip Hop party that is a fusion between Oriental music and Arabic Hip Hop,presented by a group from Syria, Beirut and China who are rapping about their daily problems.

by: Matias Nordal Carlsen

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Cabinet Office Clashes Cairo
Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
03 Oct 2013

Protesters start a fire during clashes with army soldiers at the cabinet near Tahrir Square in Cairo December 16, 2011. Stone-throwing demonstrators clashed with troops in central Cairo on Friday, witnesses said, in the worst violence since the start of Egypt's first free election in six decades. Al-Qasr Al-Aini Street, Cairo, Egypt. 16/12/201
By: Jeffrey Bright

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Resilience of Young Students in Alepp...
Aleppo, Syria
By Transterra Editor
03 Oct 2013

Children continue studying despite the dire condition of schools in Aleppo, Syria.

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Egyptians remember those killed in Se...
Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
01 Oct 2013

Egyptians gather in Cairo's Tahrir Square to mourn the deaths of 42 people killed last month in demonstrations demanding the generals who took over from Mubarak hand over to civilian rule immediately. Protesters in Tahrir Square said they now saw no difference between the generals and the president they succeeded. Cairo, Egypt. 02/12/2011

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A New Nakba for Syrian Palestinians
South Beirut, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
01 Oct 2013

Out of the 500,000 Palestinian refugees living in Syria, it is estimated that 56,000 have fled their homes because of the war, and taken refuge in Lebanon.

After Ahmed Jibril, leader of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), announced his support for the Syrian regime, and the Free Syrian army entered the Palestinian refugee camp, Yarmouk, in an angry reaction to Jibril’s statement, 85 percent of the camp’s inhabitants abandoned their homes and took refuge in Bourj el-barajneh Palestinian refugee camp in Lebanon.

These refugees feel a nostalgia for their home in Yarmouk, Syria, similar to the one felt for a forbidden Palestine after the 1948, and 1967 Arab-Israeli wars. The Palestinian refugees in Syria were part of the community with good jobs and homes, unlike the refugees in Lebanon who are restricted in terms of professions and live in an environment where the water is not clean and there is a daily 18 hour power cut.

“Oh, Yaramouk was not like Bourj” moans Mohammed, “in Syria the water is clean and pure, you can drink it.” The belief in the ‘right of return’ to Palestine – a principle of International Law - has been the cornerstone of the Palestinian struggle since the creation of Israel in 1948. However, for those Palestinian-Syrians – victims of a second displacement - there is an emerging narrative whose axis is shifting from Palestine to Yaramouk Camp, or wherever they once lived. Accordingly, the ‘right of return’ the recurring motif of the Palestinian narrative is changing its meaning in the new Middle East.

The Syrian Civil War has paved the way for a new ‘Nakba’; a Nakba leading to the return to an imagined Palestine in Syria.

Collette Hogg lives and has spent the last 11 months in Palestinian Refugee camp Bourj el-barajneh in Lebanon.

Article by Collette Hogg
Photographs by Collette Hogg

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Médecins Sans Frontières Hospital Bra...
Amman Jordan
By Transterra Editor
01 Oct 2013

Tucked away from the loud and busy streets of Amman, Jordan is a place of healing where wars’ wounded hopeless have found a reason to believe in their future. A place where highly qualified volunteers from around the globe dedicate their time and talent to the future of complete strangers. These compassionate individuals belong to Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), or Doctors Without Borders, as it is also known. MSF is a secular non-governmental organization that believes all people have the right to medical care despite race, religion, or political affiliation, and that these peoples needs supersede respect for national borders.
The MSF reconstructive surgical clinic in Amman was created six years ago by a group of surgeons as a interim project for Iraqis with complex injuries untreatable in their country. The clinic run by Médecins Sans Frontières was set up on the second floor of a hospital owned by the Red Crescent. Since its opening in 2006, the clinic has treated over 2,000 victims of violence from Iraq, Gaza, Yemen, Libya and Syria. The surgical project has even added staff due to an influx of victims of increased violence from the surrounding region. In recent months, the clinic has seen a 40 percent rise in patients, 30 percent of which are Syrians. These wounded refugees from the north are able to find their way to the hospital by word-of-mouth. The proximity of the clinic to the Jordanian-Syrian border has made it well-known among the displaced Syrians whose injuries require highly specialized care. And though the ever-increasing number of injured Syrians have forced the MSF surgical project to expand their focus from reconstructive surgery to immediate surgical care, the clinic still plans to continue its same mission in adjoining their original three surgical specialties: maxillofacial, orthopedic and plastic.

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Kalimandir, Hinduism and "Babas" of I...
Rome, Italy.
By Transterra Editor
01 Oct 2013

Kalimandir was founded by an Italian Baba known by the name of Yogi Krishnanath. This Baba, whose real name is Alessandro Pace, lived twenty years of his life on Indian mountains, places in which he came for the first time in August 1969 starting from Rome by hitch hiking. He came (forced) back to Rome and decided to build a Hindu temple on a field belonging to his family. The Temple is dedicated to Goddess Shiva and Khali and it is administrated by Krishnanath and his partner. They surf the Web and use Social Networks to "improve interfaith dialogue and to communicate with people about the activitiies of Kalimandir.

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Dadaab
Somalia, Africa
By Transterra Editor
30 Sep 2013

Can a shelter become a prison? "We cannot leave the camp neither go back to our country nor prosper". At the same time, can a shelter become homeland? "In this place I grow myself, I studied, worked and became father. I feel home". This is a contradiction faced by refugees of the largest camp worldwide, Dadaab, in north-eastern Kenya.

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Friends in Low Places
Houston, Texas
By Transterra Editor
28 Sep 2013

The cracks and alcoves around downtown Houston and Buffalo Bayou have become home to the homeless veterans. Wrestling with psychological problems, arrest warrants, and an inability to integrate into civilian society, these men group together for companionship, and seek solace in a hidden existence. Together, they build shelters from scraps of tarpaulin, or scuttle through holes in concrete bridges into the caves beyond, and fish from the river for food. They share the burden of addiction, self medicating the pain of old injuries due to lack of medical insurance, or drowning memories in a blur of alcohol or crack cocaine, which they sometimes fight over.

The percentage of veterans in the homeless community is double the representation of veterans in normal society. Around 300,000 veterans sleep rough every night throughout the United States, while around 62,000 will have been homeless at some point in 2012.

Article here: http://transterramedia.com/media/31442#

Photographs by Spike Johnson
Text by Spike Johnson

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Niger, a Dark Paradise of Uranium
Niamey, Niger
By Transterra Editor
05 Sep 2013

An unsteady bike headlight and a kid eager to escape from his mother’s arms can easily turn into a tragedy. Because when night shows up, only the headlights of the cars furtively light up the faces of Niamey’s inhabitants.

In the rural areas of Niger, where more than 83 percent of Nigeriens live and less than 2 percent of the inhabitants have access to electricity, people have to sleep at 8 p.m. because, by then, it is already dark and there is no electricity. With a blistering 48 degrees in summer and barely any electricity to turn on a fan, the people of Niger live in “darkness, warmth and insecurity,” says activist of Right of Energy organisation.

The national rate of access to electricity in Niger does not exceed 10 percent, while France lights up almost one third of its light bulbs from Uranium it extracted from Niger. Niger’s contract with Areva, which France owns 80 percent of, is expected to be renewed by the end of 2013 and currently, negotiations are underway.
The government is looking for Niger's best interest, rather than France's, as the Nigerien Minister of Mines says, “natural resources must serve our country’s interests.” This is particularly important, since the country has been ranked as the least developed country when it came to UNDP’s index of human development.

It was announced that a new mine pit will soon be open and, starting from 2015, 5000 tons of uranium will be extracted from it each year. This mine, however, was attributed to Areva in 2009, and so far, all subcontractors in the project have been foreign. Nevertheless, it has been stated that this mine will contribute to the development of Niger in the fields of health, eduction, transportation, water and access to energy. Civil society activists are skeptic of this project and have been taking measures such as organizing debates and forums and surveying the behavior of new investors, in order to ensure that they receive what they have been promised.

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Transterra Editor
10 Sep 2013

TURKEY, ISTANBUL: The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Wall by Jorge Mendez Blake. © Claudia Wien

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Reactions in Nairobi to Westgate Mall...
Nairobi, Kenya
By Transterra Editor
25 Sep 2013

The Westgate Mall in Nairobi, Kenya, was recently the site of a terrorist attack, claimed by Al Qaeda-linked militant group, Al-Shabab, based in the horn of Africa. 67 people were killed and 62 injured in the dramatic 4-day siege that came to a close on Tuesday, September 24.

Filmed by Sam Charo.
http://transterramedia.com/users/1388

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Illegal Gold Mines in Indonesia
Bunyawangi, Indonesia
By Transterra Editor
13 Jan 2011

The tradition of mining gold started at least as early as the first millennium BC. Sought after since the beginning of recorded history, gold remains a highly valued metal, reaching record highs recently on December 2, 2009, gold passed the important barrier of US$1200 per ounce to close at $1215. Gold further rallied, hitting new highs in May 2010 after the European Union debt crisis prompted further purchase of gold as a safe asset. September 2010 rose to a record $1,300 an ounce. Since April 2001 the gold price has more than tripled in value against the US dollar.
Illegal mining of gold has rocketed in many poor countries as gold prices have risen. This has created difficulties for established gold mining companies, dangers for the illegal miners themselves, as well as environmental problems.
This rise in the price of gold has created a gold rush since the mid 2000 across Ghana, Brazil, Peru and Indonesia to name but a few. As a new gold rush spreads to the world’s remotest corners, the face-off between illegal, small-scale miners and multinational firms has cost millions of dollars and claimed lives.
In Indonesia the government estimates there are 62,000 illegal miners across the country, twice the number working legally. Mines and Energy Minister Bambang Yudhoyono told parliament recently that annual losses amounted to 30 tonnes of gold. Thus far there are no answers to the problem. President Wahid's decree calls on the police chief and attorney-general to take "stern legalaction" against anyone involved in illegal mining--"both government apparatus and community members."
But it also seeks to recognize the rights of indigenous miners and calls on legal mining firms to provide
more help to local communities. One of those local communities is Presanggaran as small town located just east of mount Tumpang Pitu in Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia.
Where many miners travel daily to the illegal mines located on Tumbang Pitu. The mine has been in operation since June 2009 and local villagers have begun protesting because the waste produced by the mine is polluting the environment. Two illegal miner’s Ali aged 33 and Supur aged 30, who both live in Presanggaran.
They meet up daily at 7.00am with fellow miner’s at the local shop buying batteries for their headlamps, re-fuel their motorbikes and stock up on cigarettes. Then begins the 7km journey to the base of the mountain, where riders dismount and continue the final 2km on foot to the mining camp weaving among the numerous trails through out the low lying forest.
Upon arrival miners relax and joke before the days work begins. Ali and Supur along with fellow miners have been for the past year tunnelling deep in to mount Tumpang Pitu. Their tunnel is approx. 35 meters deep splitting into two parts at approx. 20 meters. The men work in a shift rotation as staying more than two hours continuously in the humid oxygen deprived environment can become unbearable. Ali and Supur always take the first shift, one working while the other keeps watch for potential cave-ins and accidents. Illegal miners with inadequate equipment run other risks, too. Traditional miners are not supposed to dig below 25 metres.
But some are down to 80 metres there are rock falls constantly but the presence of gold is too alluring. The miners can collect about 1 to 5 grams of gold and earn up to 175,000 rupiah (€15) a day. Supur estimates in the last year they have discovered 1 to 1 ½ kg of gold in their tunnel. But as it deepens the rock becomes harder and the risk of flood becomes higher. They contemplate to continue on, branch of in other directions or search elsewhere.
But one thing is certain if the price of gold remains the same or continues to rise, these illegal mines will remain the same or continue to grow.

Photos By: Jeffrey Bright

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Demonstration
Yemen
By Transterra Editor
23 Sep 2013

A mass demonstration took place in Tarim, one of the largest cities of the province of Hadramaut.

Hundreds of students from primary and secondary schools protested to revive what has become known as a Student Day in the Southern City.

Hundreds of students from several schools walked, waving flags of the State of South and pictures of martyrs of the peaceful revolution as they chanted anti-government slogans.

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Sulphur Mines at Kawah Ijen Indonesia 2
Kawah Ijen, Indonesia
By Transterra Editor
19 Jan 2011

In the remote East Java, Indonesia lies the ominous Kawah Ijen volcano, topped with an immense crater and a 200-meter-deep lake of sulfuric acid. It is within this precarious work environment where miners spend their days, hacking chunks of cooled sulfur with steel bars and ferrying up and down the mountain twin basket loads that weigh between 130 and 220 pounds. As they break up sulfur, they are perpetually engulfed in a cloud of smoke. Respiratory issues are rife among the workers because of this, who brave their surroundings with minimal to no protection. There is little pay-off for this sacrifice, as the daily earnings range from a mere $8 - $12. Gloves and gas masks are an unaffordable luxury.

An active vent at the edge of the lake is a source of elemental sulphur, and is what supports the mining operation. Escaping volcanic gases are channelled through a network of ceramic pipes, which causes the condensation of molten sulfur. The sulfur, which is deep red in colour when molten, pours slowly from the ends of these pipes and pools on the ground, turning bright yellow as it cools. It is this sulfur that keeps the miners returning every day despite the danger posed to their health, desperate to make a living.

Photos By: Jeffrey Bright

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Israeli Forces Demolish Bedouin Camp ...
Al Araqib, Israel
By Transterra Editor
27 Aug 2013

Al-Araqib, an unrecognized village of the Al-Turi Arab Bedouin tribe (8 km north of Beersheba), was demolished for the 54th times since July 2010. Israel Land Administration inspectors and some 40 riot police officers stormed the village and 2 bulldozers knocked down three shacks.

Photos By: Eloise Bollack

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Fallen General of Kerdasa Funeral
Nasr City, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
20 Sep 2013

The Funeral of fallen general "Nabil Farag " who was killed during the security operation on Thursday in Giza town of Kerdasa.

Photos By: Mohamed Osam

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Summer in Damascus
Damascus, Syria
By Transterra Editor
04 Jul 2012

"A little bit of Damascus" is a film, which shows another face of Damascus, than is usually seen. It was filmed in summer 2012 in the streets of Old Damascus. It shows its people, streets and monuments like Umayyad mosque or Khan As´ad Pasha. The main part of the video belongs to Ayman al-Ouf, who has a shop with wooden mosaic boxes. During the film he speaks two funny stories about Damascus. The first story is about two men who used to smoke hashish and earned a lot of money only because they created imaginery person of sheikh al-Zengi, who was originally insect. The second one is about Abu Ezzat al-Bagajati and his servant, who were known for their sense of humour. There is also third story which is about Old Damascus and prophets who are buried there or visited the city. The video has unusual edition because on the screen can be one till four shots in the same time. First four minutes are black-and-white, then it is coloured.

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Whang Od, the 92-year old Tattoo Artist
Buscalan, Philippines
By Transterra Editor
05 Dec 2012

Whang Od, the 92 year old Kalinga tattoo maker, lives in the hidden village of Buscalan
in the Kalinga province in the Philippines. This tattoo practice was used as a form of skinnatural language passed on from generation to generation.

Whang Od has become popular not only because she has appeared on National Geographic, but also because the day she dies, a big part of her tribe’s culture dies away as well. Even though some kids from the village tried learning from her, Whang Od says that the “future artist must be from her family.”

Within the tribal culture, the tattoo symbolized feminine beauty and male courage was a culture of exchange that did not require money. Now, however, people have to pay for their tattoos as they are required to start using money for things like electricity, buying pigs and hens, and rice.

Lost tourists who pass by Buscalan are offered lodging and food at Whang Od’s modest, two-story house before they are given the chance to pay 500 pesos for a tattoo chosen by Whang Od herself. Clients can only decide where they want their tattoo, unless they choose one of the drawings on Whang Od’s hands.

Whang Od would like to live to be 100 years old.

Photographs by Buscando Historias
Text by Buscando Historias

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Sample Footage by Mohanad Lord
Syria
By Transterra Editor
11 Sep 2013

A collection of sample footage from contributor Mhndlord

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Burlesque to Motherhood, the Show Goe...
San Diego, California
By Transterra Editor
01 Sep 2013

Video and text by Ashley Gallagher.
http://transterramedia.com/users/1458

This story comes from San Diego, California and documents the life of a Burlesque performer as she juggles single-motherhood and stage performances. The profiled woman, Lady Borgia, is considered one of the most prominent performers in the area and has traveled across the United States. She has also participated in the Exotic World competition at the Burlesque Hall of Fame in Las Vegas. Her tenacity to raise her son, Reilly, surrounded with "gorgeous women in fishnet stockings," is a passion she displays in home.

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Traditional Oil Wells in East Java In...
Indonesia
By Transterra Editor
27 Aug 2013

Photographer Jeffrey Bright follows traditional oil miners through the creational process of diesel oil in East Java Indonesia.

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Bulgaria's Revolution
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Transterra Editor
22 Jul 2013

Thousands of mainly younger, well-educated Bulgarians have been rallying in Sofia and other cities since June 14 to demand the resignation of the Socialist-led cabinet.

What sparked the unrest originally was the appointment of the representative of DPS (Movement of rights and freedom) Delyan Peevski as the head of the State Agency of National Security. Demonstrators then rallied against Plamen Oresharski’s cabinet, protesting openly against his media, which have been accused by the majority of the public of presenting the procession in his benefit. Because of the scandal involving the appointment of Peevski, President Rosen Plevneliev announced that he no longer trusts the Oresharski cabinet. Even after the removal of Delyan Peevski, the protests continued, still demanding the government’s resignation. Unprecedented in duration, people have now been in protesting for three consecutive months. The protests have been relatively peaceful, the activists by in large have been avoiding provocation and clashes with the police.

The journalist photographed people protesting, then in their every day life, to give a more in-depth look at the people behind the Bulgarian unrest. Borislav Popov, who decided to stay in Bulgaria rather than live abroad, believes that "we have to learn that we are the ones that are responsible for our lives and we can’t keep complaining that communism, our parents, or our employers are at fault; we have to take responsibility for our actions."

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My Life as a Nepalese Transgender
Nepal
By Transterra Editor
20 Sep 2013

Photos and Text by Rajneesh Badhari.

Nepal is the first country to recognize the third gender category. In 2007, Nepal's apex court ordered to scrap laws that are discriminatory. The court also ordered to draft a new law for same sex marriage, it hasn't materialized as constituent assembly was dissolved without delivering a new constitution.

There are few organization that are openly speaking for the LGBT issues here. But people from LGBT groups are still facing problem. Getting a new job for them has been difficult. Neelam Paudel, 21, from Morang, is one of them.

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Al Qaeda Affiliated Rebels Execute Al...
Raqqa, Syria
By Transterra Editor
16 Sep 2013

-Al Qaeda affiliated rebels in Syria executed two Alawite men on September 16 in the main square of the rebel-controlled city of Raqqa. Fighters from the “Islamic state of the Levant and Iraq”, a Sunni extremist group affiliated with Al Qaeda, justified the execution on the grounds that the men were “Nusaries”, a derogritory term used to describe members of the Alawite sect of Islam, from which Syrian president Bashar al-Assad hails.

When local women witnessing the execution protested the actions of the fighters, the fighters cursed the women and claimed that the men had raped women in the city of Homs. The men were subsequently executed and their bodies carted away in the back of a pick-up truck. This event has reinforced fears that Sunni extremists will try to eliminate the Alawite community of Syria if president Bashar al-Assad falls from power.

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Sulu's Road to Revolution
Sulu, Philippines
By Transterra Editor
07 Mar 2012

A final peace agreement with the government was signed in 1996 but is now being threatened by another peace deal by the government with the Moro Islamic Liberation front, a much more larger secessionist group who split from the MNLF in 1976. The MNLF believes that this agreement with the MILF would undermine all the agreements done with them in the past.

Conflicts in the region, and the continuous plunder of the land by corrupt powers has kept the paradise of Sulu and other parts of Mindanao in the dark for decades, far from development and still home to the poorest provinces in the country.

More than four decades later, the revolution, which also gave birth to numerous factions, failed agreements, corruption, and betrayal, killed not only thousands of men, but also ideals that faded along the way, leaving behind a torn archipelago that has yet to see genuine self determination.

Sulu is considered the most dangerous part of the Philippines where secessionist rebel groups's stronghold are located. It is also where terror and bandit groups like the Abu Sayyaf was formed and continuously engages in kidnap for ransom activities.

Photos by Jes Aznar

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Interview with Leyland Cecco
By Transterra Editor
13 Sep 2013

Contributor Leyland Cecco talks about his most recent work he sold through Transterra Media.

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Interview with Simon Letellier
By Transterra Editor
13 Sep 2013

Contributor Simon Letellier talks about one of the stories he sold through Transterra Media, where he photographed the chaos in an emergency room in Aleppo after a bombing.

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Christians Targeted in Al-Minya
Al-Minya, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
03 Sep 2013

After police violently dispersed Morsi supporters from two Cairo squares, Nahda and Rabaa squares , sectarian violence erupted in lower Egypt. Angry mobs burned churches in Al-Minya, along with houses and stores run by Christian people. Egypt's Christians are now living in fear.

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Addiction in Paris
Paris, France
By Transterra Editor
18 Apr 2013

The number of drug addicts in France is difficult to assess. The first problem to look at is defining the addiction, and which products are most common (cocaïne, weed, crack, ecstasy...). The number is believed to be between 150 000 and 300 000. In Paris, a city project named « shoot rooms » is set to open in October where associations helping drug addicts will be able to help and assist roughly 200 drug addicts. But before this opening, in December 2012, I went to meet drug addicts to better understand their day to day life. Lot of them refused to answer questions and being photographed. Only one has accepted to be followed during the day to better understand his life. I met him at CAARUD office, an association helping drug addicts in the La Chapelle area, north of Paris. The area between the La Chapelle subway and the La Chapelle gate, is one of the most important places for drugs use in Paris. Under highways, drug users smoke cocaïne and crack every day, searching for money to pay for their drug use. Philippe is one of them. He is 58 years old and drug addict for more than 20 years.
He would like to quit, but is unable to do it. For Philippe, everyday is the same thing: smoking cocaïne and searching for money to pay for it. Over the months we spent together I better understood what being a drug addict meant. At the beginning of each month, he receives money from his Togolese family. With that money, he pays for a room in a hotel where he stays during one week. His every day is the same. He wakes up, doesn’t eat breakfast. Goes to La Boutique; the center for an association helping drug addicts. He meets other drug addicts at the center and speaks with a social assistant. The association gives Philippe some new crack pipes so that disease contamination can be avoided. He then goes to meet the dealer, buying cocaïne and going back to the hotel to smoke. He sleeps a little bit, eats a burger, and later going back to smoke more.
But after one week Philippe doesn't have enough money to pay the hotel so he has to leave the room. At this time he decides to keep small amount of money he has to buy cocaïne, and everyday he goes to Sleep-in, a drug addicts’ helping association which offers addicts a bed to sleep in. Even if he doesn't like this place because of the violence between drug addicts, he has no choice because he has to sleep there. In order to smoke his cocaine he has to go under highways, or in some squats. After few days he doesn't even have enough money to buy cocaïne. So he sells his mobile phone to the dealer and tries to buy more cocaine.
Philippe is tired of this kind of life. He would like to go in rehabilitation. He has already done so once but he failed at the end and came back in Paris where his demon took him back.
This reportage wasn't easy to do because following a drug addict is quite complicated. Rendez-vous were complicated and I had to search for him during few hours. But Philippe, like lot of drug addicts in Paris, stays in the La Chapelle Area, so I always found him. But one day I didn't. So I went back the day after and many days after that. Finally, he called to tell me that he has been arrested and is now in jail. He doesn't like it but he knows that it's also a kind of rehab, and he hopes not to fail again when he is released.

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Western Influence in Kurdistan's Cul...
Sulaimaniyah, Iraq
By Transterra Editor
13 Aug 2013

Within Kurdistan and, to a lesser extent, Iraq, Sulaimaniyah has always been the city where changes start. It is known as the cultural capital of Kurdistan - more liberal, youthful and intellectual than Erbil. It is the home of Gorran - the first serious opposition to the ruling PUK and PDK parties and it is the city where all the uprisings and social upheavals in Kurdistan have begun. Although Islam still predominates in the city, people are more secular here than in Erbil and in the countryside.

Kurdistan is modernizing fast. The skylines of the cities are perpetually changing and growing upwards. There are many new cars on the street, often luxury models. People are becoming more prosperous and looking for ways to show it. At the same time, Western cultural influence is everywhere. There are multiplex cinemas that are indistinguishable from any in Europe. Internet access is faster and more commonplace. Many Kurds who left for Europe before and during the second Gulf War are now returning having lived, worked, had families and run businesses in Europe for ten years or more. Nowhere is this influence more outwardly tangible as in the style and fashion of Kurdish young people.

However, while the symbols of apparent modernization spring up all over the place, beneath the surface Kurdistan remains a deeply traditional place. Young people who dress in modern European clothes, drive new expensive 4x4s and hang out drinking in hotel bars and house parties still cannot go on dates with each other. The course of their early life is still mapped out by both familial and social expectations. The men are expected to go into a decent job (i.e. doctor, lawyer, engineer) and the women are expected to get married in their early twenties and start having children immediately. Sons and daughters live with their parents until they are married because estate agents won't rent property to single people for fear of 'dishonour'.

As they strain to create their own identity and express themselves through what they put on their back, the frustration in young men and women is palpable.

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Nuclear Power in Kudankulam, India
Kudankulam, India
By Transterra Editor
09 Sep 2013

Idinthakarai, a majority Christian fishing village near the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP) in India, has become the epicenter of the anti-nuclear movement in the region. There is an estimated one million people living within 30 kilometers of the plant in villages all along the coast of Mannar — which is against the stipulated safety rules of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) of India — and the people deeply fear that poor regulation at the KKNPP could result in a disaster similar in scale to Fukushima.

Representing this cause, since 2011, the People’s Movement Against Nuclear Energy (PMANE) has been holed up in Idinthakarai where their headquarters is located. Idinthakarai's only entry point is closely guarded by villagers which, coupled with rumours about the villagers being armed with crude bombs, means the police are reluctant to enter this zone and deal with protests.

PMANE largely depends on the efforts of the women, and the support of local priests and churches to gather support and manpower in the area for the anti-nuclear protests. They work from the Lourde Mary Church in Idinthakarai, 6 km away from the power plant, dutifully sending out press releases and Facebook updates on the rare robust internet connection provided by the church, demanding for the Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL) to address their fears.

On May 6, 2013, the Supreme Court of India cleared the way for operations to begin at the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP). But despite the villagers' need for energy from other sources, and PMANE's best efforts, they still have received little or no safety-training in the event of a disaster. And the NPCIL continues to do little to assuage the fears of the local fishing communities.

Photos by Jyorthy Karat.
Article by Srinath Perur.

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Living in the Shadow of a Gold Rush
LaRiconada, Peru
By Transterra Editor
09 Sep 2013

La Rinconada was a nice, quiet rural village in Peru’s Los Andes range twenty years ago. However, the economic crisis in the country and the discovery of gold changed the town completely during the nineties. Now, it is a crowded place where thousands of the poor from all over South America frequently immigrate looking for opportunity. The precious metal has transformed La Rinconada into a chaotic village of nearly 50,000 inhabitants (four times more than the past) with a serious lack of social services. The increase in the price of gold (25% last year and 600% in ten years) has pushed many more people to move up there.

Nowadays, the landscape in La Rinconada is full of metallic shelters built without official permits. There is no pavement, sewers and running water. It is full of rubbish and defecation everywhere. It is now a place with serious problems of alcoholism, drugs and crime. The police is nearly absent and illegal prostitution is always present. The use of mercury to separate gold from rock has created a high level of pollution that provokes aggressiveness among the population. This, added to the fact that La Rinconada is about 6,000 meters altitude, causes also breath sicknesses (especially among children) and the local clinic covers just 10% of the needs. Despite some apparent efforts of the local administration, the situation is getting worse year by year.

Photos and Text by Albert González Farran.

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After Water Comes the Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Transterra Editor
06 Sep 2013

The Bedouins living in The West Bank are living hard and simple lives. It is a daily struggle to make ends meet. Living in tent camps and small desert towns, they try to create a life for their families.
In the desert outside Bethlehem, lies a little Bedouin village called Rashayida. Circa 250
Bedouin families from the same clan inhabit the village. If you go past the village and stay on the road it turns into nothing but a small path. That is where you meet the Bedouins that still inhabit the desert.
In the area around Rashayida, the Bedouins live a quiet, simple and hard life. It is a society that does not fit in anywhere else. Here life is centered around one thing: Survival.

The lack of water is one of the great challenges in the desert. They face serious issues like Climate change, the lack of infrastructure and the always-present conflict between Israelis and Palestinians.
Even though a Bedouin does not need a lot of water to survive, the issue is not just about
clean drinking water. They need water for their livestock, personal hygiene and cooking.
Just as it is important to have water for the few crops they grow.
The Bedouins are dependent on clean water, which they can get in the nearby village
and transport into the desert. A tank of water contains three cubic metres of water that
is 3000 litres. A Palestinian family on average spends 8 percent of its monthly expenses on buying water. A worldwide comparison shows an average of 3,5 percent. This number jumps upwards of 50 percent for those Palestinian families relying on tankered water like the Bedouins.
The Bedouins are some of the poorest people in the West Bank. Their primitive lifestyle means that they pay a lot of money for water. Still the quality they get is very poor, because the water in the tanks is stagnant.
Rainwater cisterns, that collect water, are scattered throughout the area. The Romans built them in ancient times, and when fixed they can be used for watering the animals. However, this option is not enough though, due to the lack of rain.

According to WHO, every human being should have access to around 100 liters of water daily. The average on The West Bank is 70 litres.
Israelis, Israeli settlers and Palestinians get mainly their water from two places: The Jordan River and the mountain aquifer that runs under Palestinian and Israeli land. Israel also gets water from the Sea of Galilee, which is the mouth of the Jordan River. Water has been rerouted away from the Jordan River since the sixties with devastating effect. An effort to change this has begun in 2013 even though some critics deem it not nearly enough to restore the levels of the river.
The Jordan River is off limits to Palestinians, because the Israeli military has deemed it military grounds. Jordan, Lebanon, Syria also taps water from the river. This massive use
has left the river all but dry. The Dead Sea has divided into two lakes, because of the low flow.
In the Oslo accords there is a section on water, which states that the water they share shall be further resolved when the Oslo accords are resumed. This has yet to happen.

Photos by Andreas Bro
Text by Andreas Bro

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Christians in Ras al-Ayn
Ras Al-Ayn, Syria
By Transterra Editor
03 Jun 2013

The deserted streets in the Christian neighborhood of Ras al-Ayn, in the northeast of Syria, reflect the fear of the people. This was once a place where Christians went for coffee to Muslims and Kurds had tea with Arabs. Today there is no place for Orthodox Christians to practice their faith. Since the end of January this year, the priest fled the country and left the St. George Church with closed doors. The division among the Arab and Kurdish militias is destabilizing the area and brings chaos into the city. There are also more and more stories of people who have to leave their homes and kidnapping for ransom.

Some Christian families are seeking refuge with the Kurdish militia, and others with the Arabs. "The city is characterized by division," said one resident, "only God knows what future awaits the Syrian Christians."

To see the accompanying article, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/21616

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Notes from Syrians on the Ground
Azaz Syria
By Transterra Editor
03 Sep 2013

As mounting evidence of chemical weapons-use accelerates the calls for international military intervention, journalist Anna Therese Day shares her ongoing project, “Messages to America: Notes from Syrians On The Ground,” a glimpse into the millions of lives disrupted and violated by the bloody Syrian conflict. Last week, US Secretary of State John Kerry revealed findings of the alleged use of sarin nerve gas and announced his confidence that Congress will approve President Obama’s request for limited military strikes in Syria upon their resumption on September 9. The piece includes reportage from the past two years of reporting in northern rebel-controlled Syria.

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Dear America: Messages From Syria's C...
Azaz
By Transterra Editor
03 Sep 2013

Since 2011, the deadly Syrian conflict has claimed the lives of over 100,000 Syrians, while robbing millions more of their dignity and hope as they flee from their homes. Of the millions displaced, more than half are children under the age of 18. As Obama heads to Congress for permission for military intervention, journalist Anna Therese Day shares her ongoing project, “Dear America: Messages from Syrian Children,” a glimpse into the millions of children’s lives interrupted, the child-victims of the Syrian civil war.

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Hyacinth Weed Threatens Livelihoods o...
lake victoria
By Transterra Editor
01 Sep 2013

For the millions who live on or near the shores of Lake Victoria in Kenya, a plant called hyacinth is threatening their livelihoods. Hyacinth is beautiful, but for fishermen who have made their living on the sea for decades, its beauty is overshadowed by the enormous problems it presents as it takes over the shores that were once sand, now a dense mass of plants with small or sick fish in its shallow waters. In some parts, it is nearly impossible for large boats to move through.

Though there have been small solutions proposed and implemented to remove to take back the waters, but by in large, the people of Lake Victoria still wait for a solution that will save their waters.

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Typhoon Floods Manila
Manila, Philippines
By Transterra Editor
20 Aug 2013

According to the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), Typhoon Trami intensified further and picked up with maximum speed of 95 kph near the center and gustiness at 120 kph and it continues to heighten the effects of southwest monsoon that may last until Thursday.

Based on the PAGASA’s three-day rainfall data, the storm-enhanced southwest monsoon has dumped about 300 millimeters (mm) of rains.

Streets in low areas in Metro Manila are flooded. Financial offices, restaurants, schools and government offices are closed due to flooding.

There are 7 people dead as of this writing due to this disaster.

People living near Marikina River are required for force evacuation due to the river was on alert level 4 due to continuous raining.

Residents near La Mesa dam and Tulyahan River in Quezon City are required to evacuate due to the rising level of waters.

SCTEX Bridge along Pasig, Potrero collapse due to the raging waters.

As of 4:55 p.m, local governments of the following areas affected by floods amid enhanced monsoon rains have declared state of calamity:

METRO MANILA
-Muntinlupa -Pateros -Paranaque

PROVINCES
-Rizal: Taytay, San Mateo -Bataan -Pampanga (entire province) -Cavite (entire province) -Ilocos Sur: Narvacan -Laguna: Biñan, Cabuyao, San Pedro, Calamba, Sta Rosa, Bae, Sta Maria and Los Baños

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Portraits of Tunisia's Rebellion
Tunis, Tunisia
By Transterra Editor
06 Aug 2013

Following the political assassination of opposition leader Mohammad Brahimi, a continuing sit-in has been organized, "Occupy Bardo," in Bardo Square in capital Tunis. The first goal of the opposition was reached: the suspension of the National Constituent Assembly. They are still calling for the resignation of ruling party, Ennahda. These portraits of rebellion show the diversity of the people participating, and their uniting call: "We are Tunisians, We are plurality, and We respect each other."

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Tea Estates in Bangladesh
Srimangal, Bangladesh
By Transterra Editor
07 Aug 2013

Sreemangal (Srimangal), The Tea Capital of Bangladesh, is an area of tea estates with fruit groves and gardens. For miles, Sreemangal Tea Estates is an expanse of green across rolling hills. Some of the world's best tea is both cultivated and exported from Sreemangal. But there is more to Sreemangal than just tea. Sreemangal is a magical world famous for nature, forests and wildlife, which makes it a great Bangladesh Eco-Tourism Destination.

The laborers are mostly Hindu women. They originate from the neighboring states of India, mostly from Orissa and speak a language called Deshali, kind of a mixture of Bengali and language of Orissa. These laborers make around $0.50 per day.

The production of tea, photographed below, generally happens in these steps. First, the laborers pluck. The season for tea leaf-gathering lasts eight months. Workers pluck the small buds young leaves of every tea bush from early morning to night, seven days a week.

Second is appraisal, weighing and transportation. Usually for a working day the tea pluckers fill several big bundles, about 20 to 30 kilograms. The women deliver the bundles to a company representative who quickly examines the leaves, weighs the gathered quantity and write down the data in a notebook. Afterwards, women deliver the bundles to the workers in the truck which then will transport the tea leaves to the factories.

Third is factory processing, where the leaves are selected, dried and oxygenated. The last step is exportation. Between 1985 and 1990, Bangladesh exported up to 90 percent of its tea, with major customers including Pakistan, Afghanistan and the former Soviet Union. In the last 10 years (2003-12), nearly 85 percent of tea produced in the country was used for internal consumption, while the rest was exported abroad

Bangladesh exports tea to countries such as Pakistan, Afghanistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Ukraine and UK after meeting the internal demand. According to some internal sources due to a jump in domestic tea consumption, Bangladesh now exports only to Pakistan, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.

To view Multimedia Video, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/21070

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Low-Income Families Face Evictions in...
Milan, Italy
By Transterra Editor
27 Oct 2012

Vulnerable families in Milan, Italy, have become victims of extensive eviction in the city. A cut in government housing subsidies in 2012, combined with widespread unemployment and a high cost of living have contributed to the more than 67,790 evictions last year and estimated 300,000 more families at risk in 2013. A photojournalist followed several families through their unique eviction journeys, from their homes to the streets, foster homes or hotels. Often, illegal immigrants are particularly suseptible to evictions, as landlords raise their rents because they know that they are unable to report them to authorities.

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Maximum Security Prisoners Set Free b...
Naivasha, Kenya
By Transterra Editor
24 Nov 2012

Naivasha prison is the largest prison in eastern Africa, housing up to 3500 in their maximum security unit with most inmates serving life sentences. A smaller medium security prison including a small female unit is also located inside the prison compound. In 2007 Bishop Cosmas and Reverend David started bible studies and other out reach activities. Around 1500 have now gone through the programme and several inmates have been released early to preach the gospel. The gospel has affected all aspects of life in the Naivasha Maximum Security Prison and changed lives.

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Life in Rebel-Held Raqqa, Syria
Raqqa, Syria
By Transterra Editor
23 Apr 2013

Raqqa is the first Syrian provincial capital to be taken over by the rebels during the war. It offers a look into how Syria might look like after a hypothetical fall of president Bashar al-Assad. The city, still being shelled and bombed by the regime, is now under control of the Free Syrian Army and of several Islamist groups, including al-Qaeda-affiliated Jabhat al-Nusra and a group staying in the opulent governor's palace. They all have different visions for a future Syria. A Civilian Council is trying to act as a "mini-government," as they put it themselves, and a newly formed Sharia Committee had to close after hundreds protested over the arrest of two young sisters. People are enjoying their new freedom but complain about the economy, feel insecure about the future and are wary of Islamist groups. At the same time, the extremists' style is becoming 'the new cool', more young men wear beards in their style and their black bandanas are the best selling item among the rebel paraphernalia sold by street vendors.

For more photos, click here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1319

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Kenyan Grade School
Kenya
By Transterra Editor
10 Oct 2012

A decade after the free primary education policy was introduced in Kenya, the programme has increased enrollment nationally but many private schools are still present, even in very poor areas, pointing to issues regarding quality of public schools and raises questions if free primary education is actually free.

But the required funds have not been allocated to the schools: Ministry of Education records from 2009 show there were 170,000 teachers in charge of 8.2 million pupils, a ratio of 48-to-one compared to 34 in 2002 resulting in less public school children receiving a proper education and passing exams for secondary school education. In both private and public school the differences are clearly visible: more books per student, less children and education material in private schools than public school.

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Tunisia Takes to the Streets over Moh...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Transterra Editor
25 Jul 2013

After the brutal killing secular opposition party leader Mohamed Al-Brahimi, who was shot eleven times in the head in front of his family on July 25, angry protesters marched along the Habib Bourguiba Ave in capital, Tunis. This is the second assassination of an opposition figure in six months in Tunisia.

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Khanalig Village in Azerbaijan
khanalig azerbaijan
By Transterra Editor
25 Jul 2013

Khanalig is an ancient Caucasian village. It is located in the greater Caucasian mountains of Azerbaijan, on the border with Russian Dagestan. The history of Khanalig goes 5,000 years back and it is among the most ancient and continuously inhabited places in the world. To cross 63 km from Quba town to Khanalig takes almost 3 hours: the road is difficult and lays between mountains, waterfalls and rivers. Khanalig is also the highest, most remote and isolated village in Azerbaijan, and among the highest in the Caucasus. About 2,000 of Khinalig's citizens have their own language and dress in a traditional way that is kept until now. At the winter there is no access to this place because of the snow, the weather in khinalig village changes dramatically during summer and winter, ranging from −20 °C to 18 °C. Because of the high altitude and remoteness, Khanalig survived many invasions that were in that era over the years.

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The Front Lines of Kenya's National ...
Tsavo East, kenya
By Transterra Editor
10 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Service rangers are dedicated to the protection and management of wildlife in Kenya, despite the dangers the job entails. One of their main tasks involves guarding parks and reserves against those who poach elephants for their valuable ivory tusks. Though the rangers are armed with assault rifles, they face extreme dangers when faced with poachers who are often heavily armed and out number the KWS rangers. These exclusive photos portray the rangers as they put their lives on the line to protect Kenya’s threatened elephants in Tsavo East National Park. June, 2013.

View More Photos: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1244

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Morsi Overthrown, Egypt Celebrates
egypt
By Transterra Editor
03 Jul 2013

On July 3, 2013, anti-President Morsi protesters gathered in Tahrir Square, Cairo under the protection of the Egyptian army to advocate for the president to step down. The Egyptian army ousted Mohammed Morsi at 7:30 pm, Egypt's first democratically-elected leader, from power and suspended the country's constitution. Morsi was taken into military custody and Egypt's Chief Justice Adly Mansour was sworn in, completing a transition of power. Egypt's future is unknown as the country's condition is constantly changing by the power of the people. Protesters celebrated by waving flags, lighting fireworks, and taking pictures with the army patrolling the streets.
Cairo, Egypt, 2013.

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Kenyans Supply Somalis Herbal High 2013
Kenya
By Transterra Editor
12 Jun 2013

Khat, a stimulant similar to the coca leaf in South America, is heavily distributed within Nairobi, the largest city and capital of Kenya. It is cultivated in Meru and arrives in Eastleigh, a suburb of Naroibi, at 2 pm everyday. Khat is pre-ordered and bundled with the customer's name written on each sack, which local vendors then collect and sell to local chewers. Local khat vendors come to Eastleigh to sell the stimulant to Somalis who make up most of their customer base. Since it's an important cash crop for Kenyans and Ethiopians, Khat is a thriving business. It is now Ethiopia's second largest export behind coffee. Though khat has been banned by the US and other European countries, it remained legal in the UK until the beginning of July, when it was also outlawed. Previously it had been shipped to the UK four days a week from Kenya.

View More Photos:
http://transterramedia.com/collections/1069

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The Ancient Craft of Pottery in the G...
Gaza City
By Transterra Editor
06 Jun 2013

Jun 2013 12:00 This pottery factory in Gaza has been a source of income and pride for the Attallah family for generations. The tradition of pottery making in Gaza dates back centuries and has been a source of income and family pride. This ceramic factory rest underneath the Attallah family's home. The Attallahs consider the pottery industry a part of their identity and heritage. They are one of the oldest families producing pottery in Gaza. Their factory was established over 60 years ago and are now struggling to maintain not only their business but an ancestral tradition. The security situation in Gaza and the Israeli blockade has made their business unprofitable and on the brink of vanishing.

To Read Full Article Go To : http://transterramedia.com/media/19049
View More Photos Here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1175

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Yezidis Demand Return of Loved Ones H...
Dohuk
By Transterra Editor
15 Apr 2015

Yezidis hold up signs and balloons with messages directed at the Yezidis still being held by ISIS.

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Yezidis Demand Return of Loved Ones H...
Dohuk
By Transterra Editor
15 Apr 2015

The Sharya refugee camp near Dohuk in Iraqi Kurdistan.

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Yezidis Demand Return of Loved Ones H...
Dohuk
By Transterra Editor
15 Apr 2015

Yezidi children hold up signs at a protest against the detention of Yezidis still being held by ISIS.

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Yezidis Demand Return of Loved Ones H...
Dohuk
By Transterra Editor
15 Apr 2015

Yezidi children hold up signs at a protest against the detention of Yezidis still being held by ISIS.

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Refugees Flee Yemen on Oil Tanker
Aden
By Transterra Editor
15 Apr 2015

Refugees from different parts of Yemen, who were able to reach Aden, board an oil tanker leaving to Djibouti on April 15, 2015. The refugees are trying to escape the escalating violence as air strikes and ground-battles continue all over Yemen.
Transterra obtained this photo from a local employee of Aden port.

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Cameroonian Army Battles Boko Haram
Fotokol, Amchide
By Transterra Editor
16 Feb 2015

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT

February 16, 17, 2015
Fotokol; Amchide; Kolofata, Northern Cameroon

Cameroonian special forces soldiers from the Batallion d'Intervention Rapide (B.I.R.), or Rapid Intervention Battalion patrol villages and battle Boko Haram fighters along the Cameroonian-Nigerian border between the towns of Fotokol, Kolofata, and Amchide.

Located in the extreme north of Cameroon, along the Nigerian frontier, these towns have been the scene of intense fighting between Boko Haram and both Cameroonian and Nigerian troops, who have been trying to secure the porous border. The town of Fotokol was the scene of a massacre of 70 civilians by Boko Haram in early February. Cameroonian troops are now participating in an African Union funded alliance aimed at encircling and finishing off Boko Haram. The alliance also includes Nigeria, Niger, Chad, and Benin. An assault by Cameroonian forces against Boko Haram in the Nigerian village of Ndaba on March 13, 14, 2015 highlights the cross border nature of this ongoing battle.

This footage includes shots of Cameroonian troops engaging Boko Haram in Fotokol and Amchide; shots of civilians fleeing the fighting; shots of dead civilians killed by Boko Haram; an interview with a survivor of the Fotokol massacre; and shots of the river separating Nigeria and Cameroon near Fotokol.

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Boko Haram Militants Killed in Firefi...
Biu, Nigeria
By Transterra Editor
15 Jan 2015

Boko Haram militants, suspected to be Chadians, lay dead after a failed attack on Biu, suppressed after a long fire-fight with Nigerian military forces.

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Boko Haram Militants Killed in Firefi...
Biu, Nigeria
By Transterra Editor
15 Jan 2015

Boko Haram militants, suspected to be Chadians, lay dead after a failed attack on Biu, suppressed after a long fire-fight with Nigerian military forces.

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Pakistan's Fight Against the Taliban
Peshawar, Pakistan
By Transterra Editor
30 Dec 2014

The recent Taliban attack in Peshawar that took the lives of over 100 children is the latest in a years-long conflict between the Pakistani government and Taliban militants. The group has actively staged attacks on civilians and government targets since 2004, especially in the tribal regions bordering Afghanistan. With no clear end in sight to the conflict, and now mourning the loss of 132 of their children, Pakistani citizens and politicians face an uncertain security situation.

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ISIS Execution in Deir Ezzor
Deir Ezzor, Syria
By Transterra Editor
05 Dec 2014

Deir Ezzor Province, Syria

December 5, 2014

This video shows a man’s public execution carried out by ISIS in the province of Deir Ezzor.

According to the verdict read by an ISIS fighter before the execution, Mohammad Mousa al-Jasem confessed to stepping on the Quran during a quarrel with his parents.
The man was executed because “he stepped on the Quran, not because he hit his mother,” the fighter says to bystanders.

Shot List

  1. Various of public execution.

2 .SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Unnamed ISIS fighter with covered face reading execution verdict

“He stepped on God’s Book [the Quran]. He took a knife and wanted to slip his mother’s throat. God’s verdict [has been taken] by the Islamic Court. The so-called Mohammad Mousa al-Jassem confessed that, [during] a quarrel with his mother and father, he beat them and tried to kill [his mother] by placing a knife on her throat.

“She held God’s Book to deter him, but he took the Book, threw it and stepped on it and cursed God almighty.

“We shall implement God’s verdict, not because he beat his mother, but because he stepped on God’s Book.

[reading a verse from the Quran] And if you ask them, they will surely say, “‘We were only conversing and playing. Say, ‘Is it Allah and His verses and His Messenger that you were mocking?’

“‘Make no excuse; you have disbelieved after your belief. If We pardon one faction of you - We will punish another faction because they were criminals.’”

[Another fighter addresses man to be executed]

“Ask God almighty for forgiveness, you have gravely sinned! Ask God for forgiveness! Testify [that there is no God but Allah and that Mohammad is His Messenger].”

[A fighter shoots the man with a pistol in the head amid shouts “God is greatest!” and shooting in the air.]

“The State of Islam shall remain! The state of Islam shall remain! This is the destiny of each apostate!”

3 Wide of man’s body being tied to a fence.