David Rengel David Rengel

(Torreblanca de los Caños, Sevilla. 1978) Photographer and documentary filmmaker. His professional activity is related to the film industry for over 14 years. Operator, assistant or director of photography in spot, videoclips, TV shows, movies, or national and international documentaries, including: Norma Foster. David Trueba; Camino. Javier Fesser, The Devil's Backbone. Guillermo del Toro; Lázaro de Tormes. Fernando Fernan Gomez, The Kingdom of Heaven. Ridley Scott, nobody knows anybody. Mateo Gil; Among Wolves. Gerardo Olivares. Is documenting projects in Asia, Africa, Central America, Europe, with the collaboration of NGOs like the Red Cross, Doctors Without Borders, Red Sport and Cooperation, World Vision and published in national and international media, National Geographic, Days Japan, Colors Magazine, CNN, Foreign Policy, El País, Fisheye, Sunday Times, Interviú, Yo Dona or The World (XL Weekly). Co-founder of An Hua in order to publicize the forgotten conflicts and document the social, historical and contemporary changes. Focused its commitment issues and concerns related to human rights, anthropology, economics and environment. Awards 2013 • 1st Prize and Gold Medal China International Photographic Art Exhibition • 1st Prize Contemporary African Photography Award (Popcap’13) • 2º Prize International Image Contest (FINI 2013) • 1st Prize Globalgiving Photo Contest • Finalist XVI International Prize of Humanitarian Photography Luis Valtueña • Finalist Iberoamerican photography projects “Saltando Muros” Spain. FIArt Foundation 2012 • Grant 12th Photographic Forum Can Basté • 1st Prize International Photography Revela'12 to holders of the Social Rights • Finalist 4º Quarter JGS - Forward Thinking Museum Contest 2010 • Finalist Award Photo Spain Fisheye Human Rights 2010 • Finalist Photo Discoveries Spain 2010. Exhibitions 2013 • Institute Cervantes, New Delhi, India. "Future Plans". • Vogele Kultur Centrum, Zurich, Switzerland. "Future Plans". • Lagos Photo Festival, Lagos, Nigeria. "Future Plans". • JT Photogallery, Outono Photographic'13, Vigo, Spain. "Future Plans". • Athens Photo Festival, Athens. Greece. "Future Plans". • Photo Festival Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. "Future Plans". • Delhi Photo Festival, India Habit Center, New Delhi, India. "Future Plans". • Collective. "The Bell Tolls", Buenos Aires, Argentina. • International Festival of the Image, Mexico DF, Mexico. "Future Plans". • Can Basté Foundation, Barcelona, Spain. "Future Plans". • Collective. International Luis Valtueña, Pamplona, Vigo, Seville, Barcelona, Madrid ... Spain. "Kala Azar. Black Fever ". 2012 • Collective “Award Reveals”. Outono Photographic’12, Ourense, Spain. “Memory Books”. • Collective HeroRats-Apopo, Deurne Rivierenhof, Antwerpen. • Collective “Award Reveals”. Photography Biennial Xavier Miserach, Son Espace Gallery, Cataluña, Spain. “Memory Books”. • Photo Gallery FNAC. Madrid, Barcelona, Sevilla, La Coruna ... . "Ninja: Gold Rush in Mongolia". 2010 • Photo Gallery FNAC. Madrid, Barcelona, Sevilla, La Coruna ... . "Memory Books". • Collective, Photo Spain Fisheye Human Rights. Madrid, Barcelona, Sevilla... . “Memory Books”.

Collections created

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Dirty Tourism and Child Labor in Camb...
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Around the world, the popularity of poverty-driven tourism, including visits to orphanages, slums or landfills is growing. This tourist activity was born in the 19th century in the poorest neighborhoods of London, Paris and Manhattan.Today, these types of tours use children and their families for the economic benefit of the organizers, leading to greater exploitation and denigrating children, often under-age workers living in poor conditions, as they become the object of the visit.

Tourism is a major source of income for Cambodia and Siem Reap famous on the world for the temples of Angkor Wat World Heritage, is considered the tourist capital of the country. About 25 kilometers from the city, tons of garbage and toxic wastes build up in Anlong Pi, the main landfill for Siem Reap, every day. Most of the 200 people who work and live in this dump, including at least 50 children, earn less than $ 1,25 a day collecting plastic, glass, paper, copper ... or anything that can be recycled and sold. But children and inhabitants of the landfill not only have to endure the stench of tons of garbage, that trucks bring in more than 10 times a day. Tour guides and tour companies offer visits to the landfill, where adults and children work and live in extreme poverty, to allow tourists from wealthy countries to take pictures with the children, as part of their tour. Buses, tuk-tuks or taxis arrive full of foreign tourists, making a place where children are forced to work to survive into a spectacle.

On 20 November 1959, United Nations adopted the Declaration of the Rights of the Child. In paragraph 9, the Declaration specifies that the child must be protected against all forms of neglect, cruelty and exploitation. It bans practices pushing children to engage in any occupation or employment, which would prejudice his health, education or interfere with his physical, mental or moral development. These prescriptions are far from being fulfilled. Many children work part time or full up to 12 hours a day at the garbage dump of Anlong Pi rummaging through the trash to help their families and get some money.

Media created

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Child Labor Tourism 25
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Sigen Rathy is 12 years old. She returns to work as the tourists leave the landfill after their tour. She wants to be a doctor in the future. Working alongside her parents, she earns about 4000 rieles daily, or just under one dollar.

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Child Labor Tourism 23
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Kon Mai is 15 years old. He had to leave school because his parents constantly travel from one place to another in the country, or even outside Cambodia, looking for work to support him and his five young brothers. His parents now also work at the garbage dump. At home, he faces domestic violence, and he wants to leave as soon as possible. In the future, he would like to work in construction.

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Child Labor Tourism 24
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists leave on the bus that brought them to the garbage dump of Anlong Pi. Children say goodbye to tourists, hoping to receive more sweets or some money. Tourists continue taking pictures as they say goodbye to the children and residents of the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 22
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

The increase in tourism has generated an increase of garbage in Siem Reap. This situation has worsened conditions for families living and working in Anlong Pi. The landfill is being expanded by GAEA. This company earns big money with the business of garbage and recycling.

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Child Labor Tourism 20
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Japanese tourists cover their faces with masks to avoid breathing in toxins or bacteria. One woman takes photos of children working in the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 21
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump with their families from different regions of the country.

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Child Labor Tourism 19
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump with their families from different regions of the country.

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Child Labor Tourism 18
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A truck from GAEA, the company in charge of landfill Anlong Pi, arrives at the landfill full of garbage from Siem Reap. From dawn to dusk, for a minimum of 12 hours per day, people working in the landfill, children and adults, scavenge through tons of waste, looking for recyclable materials or any items with value that can be sold like plastic, paper, copper, glass, etc. to eek out a living.

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Child Labor Tourism 17
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Kon Mai, 15, stands atop a mountain of garbage from which he looks defiantly towards a group of tourists. He started to work in the garbage dump at 12 years-old. He had to leave school because his parents constantly travel from one place to another in the country, or even outside Cambodia, looking for work to support him and his five young brothers. His parents now also work at the garbage dump. At home, he faces domestic violence, and he wants to leave as soon as possible. In the future, he would like to work in construction.

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Child Labor Tourism 16
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of Japanese tourists take pictures of the landfill. Tourists are informed of these visits by word of mouth or directly with local tour guides in the hotels where they stay.

Families working in the landfill do not say anything about the tours. They are silent. The landfill is controlled by a private company that decides who works or does not work at the Anlong Pi, and the company benefits from these tours.

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Child Labor Tourism 14
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump, most of whom have come with their families from different regions of the country to work.

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Child Labor Tourism 15
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists leave on the bus that brought them to the garbage dump of Anlong Pi. Children say goodbye to tourists, hoping to receive more sweets or some money. Tourists continue taking pictures as they say goodbye to the children and residents of the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 13
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

While Sueun Chany, 12, carries large bags of trash from one side of the garbage dump to the other, a tourist waits to take pictures of children alongside their peers who have arrived by Tuk-Tuk. Foreign tourist visit the Anlong Pi garbage dump as part of their holiday in Cambodia.

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Child Labor Tourism 12
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Suy Sokhon is 16 years old, and has gone two years without going to school. Her parents can not afford the costs of books and tuition. She has worked in the landfill from 12 years of age.

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Child Labor Tourism 10
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A Japanese tourist covers her mouth with her hands because she can't bear the strong smell that this mountain of toxic waste and decaying food generates. She does this without putting down the iphone with which she takes pictures. Some children living and working in the landfill laugh at her.

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Child Labor Tourism 11
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Meas Chan, 10, looks for recyclable materials inside the garbage dump. Tons of waste arrive daily to garbage dump of Anlong Pi from the tourist destination of Siem Reap. He walks behind a bulldozer driven by his father, while his younger brother looks at him. About 50 under-aged children work in the garbage dump according to available data.

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Child Labor Tourism 09
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

The inhabitants of landfills burn some of the waste they receive because it is impossible to recycle all of it, and space is limited. Toxic gases are unbearable, and soil and groundwater are contaminated. Some locals fall sick due to the continuous intake of toxic gases.

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Child Labor Tourism 08
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Lia Neang Syer is 14 years old. She began working in the garbage dumb at 10 years old. She could not continue studying, because she had no money to pay for books and extra lessons. She has two sisters and one younger brother, and her mother also works at the garbage dump. She does not like the job, but she is forced to work because her family needs the money to live. Behind her, other children look for plastic and metal to sell.

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Child Labor Tourism 07
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A Japanese tourist gets his picture taken with children working in the garbage dump by his hiking mates. Tourists take pictures and give candies to children. This group of Japanese tourist are medical students who have come to the dump Anlog Pi on their tour rote.

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Child Labor Tourism 05
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Hael Kemra is 15 years old. In the future she wants to be an English teacher. She began working at the dump at 10 years old. Her mother took her to the garbage dump to earn money when her father abandoned them.

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Child Labor Tourism 06
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Children and their parents, all are landfill workers. They scavenge in the trash and look for recyclable materials inside the garbage dump with a metal hook attached to a wooden stick, walking behind a bulldozer. Tons of waste arrive daily to garbage dump of Anlong Pi from the tourist destination of Siem Reap. Largely for economic reasons, children are forced to work at the landfill by their parents. Some study in the mornings, and in the afternoons they will work at the landfill.

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Child Labor Tourism 04
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists disturb children working in the garbage dump of Anlong Pi while the children are resting. The tourists, visiting this landfill as part of their package vacation to Cambodia, take pictures of the children with their cameras and phones. Their tour route offers a visit to the garbage dump where children work alongside adults in extreme poverty and dangerous conditions, allowing them to take pictures with the children. The landfill is located a few kilometers from Siem Reap, the most famous tourist destination in Cambodia, for the temples of Angkor.

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Child Labor Tourism 03
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Sau Srey Neang is 11 years old and has three brothers and one sister younger. She has gone over a half a year without hearing from her father, who went to work to Thailand. She knows that her family needs help, but she wants to continue studying to be a teacher. This is her first year working in the landfill.

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Child Labor Tourism 02
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists is lead through the landfill in Siem Reap, Cambodia where many children work sorting trash.

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Child Labor Tourism 01
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Viku Tupse is 9 years old. Among the trash, he found a broken face of Mickey Mouse. He knows that this will pull on the heartstrings of tourists and puts it on the head. He does not understand why tourists visit the garbage dump where he works, but he likes the candies that they give him. He has lived in the landfill for two years.