Andreas bro Andreas bro

My name is Andreas Bro I am a freelance photojournalist based in Copenhagen. I solve a wide range of assignments, still and moving images.

Media created

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Empty containers in the desert. To be filled with water from a rainwater cistern.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Alia is helping the women clean out the enclosure for the goats. Everybody has to work, even the kids. The dust is everywhere while animal feces and dirt is put into large bags, bare handed.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Ferhan drinks from a rain water cistern. Even though the water is only for live stock due to parasites.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Bedouin in the desert, riding on his donkey and taking care of his animals.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Up the hill behind the fence is a large manmade pool where the Bedouins lead the animals to drink water. It is built by YMCA and Dan Church Aid(NGO’s). It is projects like this that help the Bedouins maintain their ancient way of life in the desert.
The pool is built on the site for an ancient christian church several centuries old.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The view from Mohammad’s house in Rashayida. He has a wife in the desert village and a wife out in the desert a few kilometres away. It is a part of ancient Bedouin culture to have more than one wife.
Najat, one of Mohammad’s many daughters, is playing in front of the house.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Omar is trying to move the donkey. At the same time the donkey is drinking from a leak in a water pipe that connects the houses in Rashayida with water.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The men do not work as much as the women. But they always handle the slaughtering of animals. The younger men are shepherds while the older men are the patriarchs of the family. They are in charge and are responsible for making sure that everything is being done according to plan.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
27 Mar 2011

Na’ma is making sure the sheep stays still while Sabha is milking it. The women in the Bedouin communities are in charge of almost all of the domestic duties. They prepare food, take care of the kids and milk the animals at the end of the day, when they get back from grazing in the desert.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Shepherd in the desert is resting while his livestock is making their way throught the desert.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Because of the lack of rain it is only the most robust plants that can grow. The Bedouins produce almost no crops because of the tough climate. The little crop they do have demands a lot of nurturing.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The tank is the Bedouin's only way to get water when the rainwater cisterns are not filled.
The water they use for everything from cooking to feeding to the animals. The tanks are placed in the outskirts of the camps and then the water is filled into smaller containers and brought into the camp.
The water is being transported from the nearby desert village in a tractor. With the expenses of rental of a tractor, gas and the price of the water the total amount is circa 55 dollars and is a major part of the budget. In some periods it can be necessary to collect water as much as once a day.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

A traditional Bedouin meal consists of pieces of meat of goat or lamb put on top of a base of rice and bread and then poured over with warm water. The food is eaten by forming meat, rice and bread into a little ball, which you then shove into your mouth with your thumb.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

A fire is lit for making tea. Drinking tea is an integrated part of being Bedouin.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Several of the men have gone out into the desert to check up on the animals. Afterwards they are resting, enjoying the wild nature, before returning back home.
From left: Salem, Mohammad, Saad, Salem, Yusef and Funkhor

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Taleb is laying on a couple of mattresses in a Bedouin camp in the desert. The Bedouins in this area have many children. A lot of men have two wives and upwards of twenty children.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Hamida is the oldest Bedouin in and around Rashayida. The word is that she is 110 years old.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The young men from the surrounding Bedouin camps met up in the common “television lounge” which is a shed without windows. With one lamp hanging from the ceiling and a TV they spend the night together. The electricity they get from a solar panel, which a NGO built for them. Tonight they are watching a Turkish soap series translated into Arabic.
From left: Khaled, Awda, Ferhan, Suad, Mosa and Salem.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
27 Mar 2011

Ferhan is a shepherd. Almost every day he takes the sheep out for as much as ten hours. He is resting before he rides on with the animals into the desert. The Bedouins have goats, Sheep and camels. The animals are their livelihood.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Donkeys are the young shepherds' preferred transportation in the desert. Every day they lead the animals out towards food and water. The sun is coming down relentlessly and the heat is extreme even early in the day.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

A goat has been slaughtered and is waiting to be cut up, cooked and eaten for lunch.

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Mohammad Ali is watering the little trees that are placed inside the enclosure. Every tree gets a couple of litres of water so it stays alive.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

The Eurovision Song Contest 2012 was held in Azerbaijan. The land of fire, as it is called, put on a massive and spectacular show but the festivities were tainted by the country's poor human rights record and its harsh crack down on peaceful protests. The country’s own opposition tried to draw attention to the fact that the country is not a fair democracy even though the government tries to present such an image.
A protester is getting taken away at a peaceful rally at the lavish boulevard along Baku’s harbour front. The secret police would walk around the protesters and single them out. The minute they started shouting slogans they would be shut-up, dragged off into a police car that would speed off, or they would be put in a bus and taken to a police station. Often this would be done very quickly and violently.
The protest was held by critics of the current regime and was partly held to make the foreign media aware of the problems in the country.
According to Amnesty International it is not a rare sight to see protesters getting arrested, registered and then left somewhere. If you are a part of arranging the protest you could look at jail time. Normally the regime charges people with hooliganism if they need someone to disappear for a few years. That or send them to do military service.
Unfortunately there are reports of alleged torture of people that are incarcerated.
Independent journalists work under tough conditions with no protection from the government and are subject to targeting.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

The Eurovision Song Contest 2012 was held in Azerbaijan. The land of fire, as it is called, put on a massive and spectacular show but the festivities were tainted by the country's poor human rights record and its harsh crack down on peaceful protests. The country’s own opposition tried to draw attention to the fact that the country is not a fair democracy even though the government tries to present such an image.
A protester is getting taken away at a peaceful rally at the lavish boulevard along Baku’s harbour front. The secret police would walk around the protesters and single them out. The minute they started shouting slogans they would be shut-up, dragged off into a police car that would speed off, or they would be put in a bus and taken to a police station. Often this would be done very quickly and violently.
The protest was held by critics of the current regime and was partly held to make the foreign media aware of the problems in the country.
According to Amnesty International it is not a rare sight to see protesters getting arrested, registered and then left somewhere. If you are a part of arranging the protest you could look at jail time. Normally the regime charges people with hooliganism if they need someone to disappear for a few years. That or send them to do military service.
Unfortunately there are reports of alleged torture of people that are incarcerated.
Independent journalists work under tough conditions with no protection from the government and are subject to targeting.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

The Eurovision Song Contest 2012 was held in Azerbaijan. The land of fire, as it is called, put on a massive and spectacular show but the festivities were tainted by the country's poor human rights record and its harsh crack down on peaceful protests. The country’s own opposition tried to draw attention to the fact that the country is not a fair democracy even though the government tries to present such an image.
A protester is getting taken away at a peaceful rally at the lavish boulevard along Baku’s harbour front. The secret police would walk around the protesters and single them out. The minute they started shouting slogans they would be shut-up, dragged off into a police car that would speed off, or they would be put in a bus and taken to a police station. Often this would be done very quickly and violently.
The protest was held by critics of the current regime and was partly held to make the foreign media aware of the problems in the country.
According to Amnesty International it is not a rare sight to see protesters getting arrested, registered and then left somewhere. If you are a part of arranging the protest you could look at jail time. Normally the regime charges people with hooliganism if they need someone to disappear for a few years. That or send them to do military service.
Unfortunately there are reports of alleged torture of people that are incarcerated.
Independent journalists work under tough conditions with no protection from the government and are subject to targeting.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

The Eurovision Song Contest 2012 was held in Azerbaijan. The land of fire, as it is called, put on a massive and spectacular show but the festivities were tainted by the country's poor human rights record and its harsh crack down on peaceful protests. The country’s own opposition tried to draw attention to the fact that the country is not a fair democracy even though the government tries to present such an image.
A protester is getting taken away at a peaceful rally at the lavish boulevard along Baku’s harbour front. The secret police would walk around the protesters and single them out. The minute they started shouting slogans they would be shut-up, dragged off into a police car that would speed off, or they would be put in a bus and taken to a police station. Often this would be done very quickly and violently.
The protest was held by critics of the current regime and was partly held to make the foreign media aware of the problems in the country.
According to Amnesty International it is not a rare sight to see protesters getting arrested, registered and then left somewhere. If you are a part of arranging the protest you could look at jail time. Normally the regime charges people with hooliganism if they need someone to disappear for a few years. That or send them to do military service.
Unfortunately there are reports of alleged torture of people that are incarcerated.
Independent journalists work under tough conditions with no protection from the government and are subject to targeting.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

The Eurovision Song Contest 2012 was held in Azerbaijan. The land of fire, as it is called, put on a massive and spectacular show but the festivities were tainted by the country's poor human rights record and its harsh crack down on peaceful protests. The country’s own opposition tried to draw attention to the fact that the country is not a fair democracy even though the government tries to present such an image.
A protester is getting taken away at a peaceful rally at the lavish boulevard along Baku’s harbour front. The secret police would walk around the protesters and single them out. The minute they started shouting slogans they would be shut-up, dragged off into a police car that would speed off, or they would be put in a bus and taken to a police station. Often this would be done very quickly and violently.
The protest was held by critics of the current regime and was partly held to make the foreign media aware of the problems in the country.
According to Amnesty International it is not a rare sight to see protesters getting arrested, registered and then left somewhere. If you are a part of arranging the protest you could look at jail time. Normally the regime charges people with hooliganism if they need someone to disappear for a few years. That or send them to do military service.
Unfortunately there are reports of alleged torture of people that are incarcerated.
Independent journalists work under tough conditions with no protection from the government and are subject to targeting.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

Two women are arrested during a protest in front of the national Azeri TV station for shouting slogans. The protest took place during the Eurovision song contest. Civilian agents and policemen arrested everyone present who was not press or security, including bystanders not involved in the protest.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

The Eurovision Song Contest 2012 was held in Azerbaijan. The land of fire, as it is called, put on a massive and spectacular show but the festivities were tainted by the country's poor human rights record and its harsh crack down on peaceful protests. The country’s own opposition tried to draw attention to the fact that the country is not a fair democracy even though the government tries to present such an image.
A protester is getting taken away at a peaceful rally at the lavish boulevard along Baku’s harbour front. The secret police would walk around the protesters and single them out. The minute they started shouting slogans they would be shut-up, dragged off into a police car that would speed off, or they would be put in a bus and taken to a police station. Often this would be done very quickly and violently.
The protest was held by critics of the current regime and was partly held to make the foreign media aware of the problems in the country.
According to Amnesty International it is not a rare sight to see protesters getting arrested, registered and then left somewhere. If you are a part of arranging the protest you could look at jail time. Normally the regime charges people with hooliganism if they need someone to disappear for a few years. That or send them to do military service.
Unfortunately there are reports of alleged torture of people that are incarcerated.
Independent journalists work under tough conditions with no protection from the government and are subject to targeting.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

The Eurovision Song Contest 2012 was held in Azerbaijan. The land of fire, as it is called, put on a massive and spectacular show but the festivities were tainted by the country's poor human rights record and its harsh crack down on peaceful protests. The country’s own opposition tried to draw attention to the fact that the country is not a fair democracy even though the government tries to present such an image.
A protester is getting taken away at a peaceful rally at the lavish boulevard along Baku’s harbour front. The secret police would walk around the protesters and single them out. The minute they started shouting slogans they would be shut-up, dragged off into a police car that would speed off, or they would be put in a bus and taken to a police station. Often this would be done very quickly and violently.
The protest was held by critics of the current regime and was partly held to make the foreign media aware of the problems in the country.
According to Amnesty International it is not a rare sight to see protesters getting arrested, registered and then left somewhere. If you are a part of arranging the protest you could look at jail time. Normally the regime charges people with hooliganism if they need someone to disappear for a few years. That or send them to do military service.
Unfortunately there are reports of alleged torture of people that are incarcerated.
Independent journalists work under tough conditions with no protection from the government and are subject to targeting.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

The Eurovision Song Contest 2012 was held in Azerbaijan. The land of fire, as it is called, put on a massive and spectacular show but the festivities were tainted by the country's poor human rights record and its harsh crack down on peaceful protests. The country’s own opposition tried to draw attention to the fact that the country is not a fair democracy even though the government tries to present such an image.
A protester is getting taken away at a peaceful rally at the lavish boulevard along Baku’s harbour front. The secret police would walk around the protesters and single them out. The minute they started shouting slogans they would be shut-up, dragged off into a police car that would speed off, or they would be put in a bus and taken to a police station. Often this would be done very quickly and violently.
The protest was held by critics of the current regime and was partly held to make the foreign media aware of the problems in the country.
According to Amnesty International it is not a rare sight to see protesters getting arrested, registered and then left somewhere. If you are a part of arranging the protest you could look at jail time. Normally the regime charges people with hooliganism if they need someone to disappear for a few years. That or send them to do military service.
Unfortunately there are reports of alleged torture of people that are incarcerated.
Independent journalists work under tough conditions with no protection from the government and are subject to targeting.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

The Eurovision Song Contest 2012 was held in Azerbaijan. The land of fire, as it is called, put on a massive and spectacular show but the festivities were tainted by the country's poor human rights record and its harsh crack down on peaceful protests. The country’s own opposition tried to draw attention to the fact that the country is not a fair democracy even though the government tries to present such an image.
A protester is getting taken away at a peaceful rally at the lavish boulevard along Baku’s harbour front. The secret police would walk around the protesters and single them out. The minute they started shouting slogans they would be shut-up, dragged off into a police car that would speed off, or they would be put in a bus and taken to a police station. Often this would be done very quickly and violently.
The protest was held by critics of the current regime and was partly held to make the foreign media aware of the problems in the country.
According to Amnesty International it is not a rare sight to see protesters getting arrested, registered and then left somewhere. If you are a part of arranging the protest you could look at jail time. Normally the regime charges people with hooliganism if they need someone to disappear for a few years. That or send them to do military service.
Unfortunately there are reports of alleged torture of people that are incarcerated.
Independent journalists work under tough conditions with no protection from the government and are subject to targeting.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

During the Eurovision Song contest there were protests, most of them organized by the opposition. One man was arrested by undercover agents/police during a protest in front of the national TV station.
The agents would go through the crowd and arrest anybody who was not press or police. This man turned up with a few others and started to give a speech, within seconds he was detained and taken away. One other protester that was arrested had heard the man saying that he was a member of the government party.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan demonstrations during Euro...
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
20 May 2012

During the Eurovision Song contest there were protests, most of them organized by the opposition. This woman was arrested by undercover agents/police during a protest in front of the national TV station.
The agents would go through the crowd and arrest anybody who was not press or police. This woman walked by the protest, and started shouting, very quickly her and the woman she was with were put in a police car and driven away.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan: An Illusion (12 of 12)
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
21 May 2012

A museum that was built by Ilham Aliyev to commemorate his father Heydar Aliyev. The museum was opened during the week Eurovision was held in the capitol. It is normal procedure that families are being asked to move when the government wants to expand and build on a large scale.
If people refuse they are forced to give up their homes. There are accounts of people being threatened and forced to sign contracts to sell their own house and of houses being demolished with people’s belongings still in them.
The government makes an agreement of payment but either the money is not paid or the amount paid is below market price and not sufficient for families to buy something similar in a new location.
Go to www.andreasbro.com to watch and read personal accounts.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan: An Illusion (11 of 12)
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
21 May 2012

With Azerbaijan winning a temporary seat in the UN Security Council last year and becoming a member of PACE (Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly).
It would be easy to think that leaders in the west would criticise and put pressure on the president Ilham Aliyev to implement democratic reform and release political prisoners. This is however not the case.
In a recent article featured in the Danish national daily newspaper Politiken a report was mentioned which documents that some PACE members who are perceived by the Azeri Government to be the country’s “friends” receive 0,4-0,6 grams of caviar at an estimated value per kilograms of almost 1700 dollars. Trips and conferences in the land of fire, as Azerbaijan is called, are seen as well with lavish gifts to follow.

With this kind of behaviour it has managed to stop it’s critics. One of PACE’s jobs are to overview that new members in the east uphold the promise they made when they joined, to uphold human rights and release political prisoners.
The writers of the report say itself that the government in Baku has managed to avoid its obligations towards the European Council.
According to Amnesty international the lack of criticism is to be found in Azerbaijan being a very strategic country. Being next door to Iran and a stop over for equipment and personnel to Afghanistan and of course the vast resources of oil and natural gas.

Thumb sm
Azerbaijan: An Illusion (10 of 12)
Baku, Azerbaijan
By Andreas bro
21 May 2012

Transparency International (transparency.org) currently rates Azerbaijan number 143 out of 183 on the corruption chart with a score at 2.4 out of possible 10.
Azerbaijan is believed to have corruption on the highest levels of government.
A lot of commerce and business in the country is monopolized and so it is hard for regular people to break into business and make their fortune. To do so you would most likely have to pay the people that control the business a bribe to get a foothold, which for many people is out of the question.
It seems impossible to work your way up from nothing.
If this is not possible you can work for the government then you have a good chance to make a decent living. But if you are affiliated with any of the opposition parties it is almost impossible to find employment.