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Sickness born out of poverty (2 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

I have now lost the feeling in my feet and constantly injure myself.

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Sickness born out of poverty (1 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

Life is extremely difficult, my son helps me to dress myself, clean my wounds and now that I have completely lost my sight navigate through my house. CIOML provide me with antibiotics which has helped calm the disease spreading but I feel that it is now too late.

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Cham fisher folk fear their future (1...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

Karim and his wife Amrah fish almost every day in the Tonle Sap river. Karim jumps on his small fishing boat after diving into the waters to free his fishing net, which got stuck between the rocks. Karim says, "The only thing we can do is go fishing. I found peace in that, but if we have to leave this place, I don’t know where to go.”

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Cham fisher folk fear their future (1...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

Cham fishermen pray in their mosque, an open space with a green cloth that works as a roof. “When the wind is blowing hard, our mosque sometimes collapses. Then we have to built it up again,” says Treh Roun, one of the three local leaders. Behind the mosque, the Sokha hotel is under construction. The 16-floor hotel will probably be opened in 2014 and is expected to have room for about 800 guests.

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From Top of the Rock
new york
By motasemdhawi
31 Dec 2012

Amazing view for New York city from top of the rock

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The Pilgrimage (29 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
30 Dec 2012

A group of pilgrims return to their camp after visiting the holy site of Lalibela. Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (28 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

A group of pilgrims recite the bible at an early morning prayer at the holy complex of Lalibela. Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (8 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

Wrapped in shrouds of early morning mist and cotton, Ethiopian Orthodox Christians stand in prayer at the edge of Bet Giyorgis, the rock church carved to resemble a cross. Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, in the small town of Lalibela, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (7 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

In the 1500s, King Lalibela had 11 churches hewn from a 'mother rock' in order to create a holy place underground safe for pilgrims to worship and evade detection. The result was so captivating that the first European to enter the site wrote "I am weary of writing more about these buildings, because it seems to me that I shall not be believed if I write more." Lalibela's vision ensured continued worship for hundreds of years, with masses of the pious still congregating each Christmas. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (6 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

Narrow tunnels underneath the churches and within the mountain connect the churches, and as the number of pilgrims swell dramatically with Christmas approaching, the passages become an increasingly tight traverse. Stories of long treks echo off the cool stone, with one pilgrim sharing a story of his group's barefoot journey of more than 8 days in order to reach Lalibela. As so many villages are within reach, more than 60,000 pilgrims descend on the churches each Christmas. Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (5 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

Serenity and fulfillment consummate one's spiritual journey. For the pilgrims transfixed in prayer, the experience has been a voyage both into the depths of the earth as well as the depths of their own faith. Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, in the small town of Lalibela, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (4 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

Resting against the rock face of the church, an Orthodox Christian is caught in a moment of contemplation. Each of the underground churches contain a thick and richly colored curtain hiding a replica of the Ark of the Covenant, viewed only by priests, deacons and bishops. Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, in the small town of Lalibela, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (3 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

Pious Ethiopian Orthodox Christians stand above the cross-shaped stone church of Bet Giyorgis. After congregating early in the morning, the pilgrims travel down the stone steps of the church to be blessed by the priest. Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, in the small town of Lalibela, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (2 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

Rows of pilgrims from villages all over Ethiopia file down paths on their way to be blessed by priests and visit the holy site of Lalibela. Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, in the small town of Lalibela, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (12 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

A young Orthodox Priest takes part in the prayers early in the morning at Bet Giyorgis, the cross-shaped stone church in Lalibela. Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (11 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

An Ethiopian Orthodox priest awaits pilgrims in one of Lalibela's 12 stone churches. Pilgrims flock to the holy city each year for Christmas. Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (10 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

Religious iconography is carved into the stone of the many rock-hewn churches of Lalibela. Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (9 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

A pilgrim prays against the wall of Bet Giyorgis, the cross-shaped stone church in Lalibela. Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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75th Anniversary of the Nanjing Massa...
Nanjing, China
By amandamustard
12 Dec 2012

A man views recovered remains from a mass grave. Thousands gather at the Memorial Hall in Nanjing to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, of which fewer than 200 survivors currently remain. On December 13, 1937, Japanese troops began the occupation of the then capital of China. According to the 1946-1948 Tokyo War Crimes Trials, over 300,000 Chinese were killed and at least 20,000 were raped over the course of six weeks. Hundreds of testimonies, diaries, photographs and film reels depict mass executions and brutal cases of torture and rape. Despite evidence, some Japanese officials have disputed the massacre’s legitimacy. As a formal apology has yet to be made, this disparity remains to be an underlying resentment in Sino-Japanese relations, even after 75 years have past.

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75th Anniversary of the Nanjing Massa...
Nanjing, China
By amandamustard
12 Dec 2012

Thousands gather at the Memorial Hall in Nanjing to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, of which fewer than 200 survivors currently remain. On December 13, 1937, Japanese troops began the occupation of the then capital of China. According to the 1946-1948 Tokyo War Crimes Trials, over 300,000 Chinese were killed and at least 20,000 were raped over the course of six weeks. Hundreds of testimonies, diaries, photographs and film reels depict mass executions and brutal cases of torture and rape. Despite evidence, some Japanese officials have disputed the massacre’s legitimacy. As a formal apology has yet to be made, this disparity remains to be an underlying resentment in Sino-Japanese relations, even after 75 years have past.

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75th Anniversary of the Nanjing Massa...
Nanjing, China
By amandamustard
12 Dec 2012

A man throws a coin at a pond at the Peace Stage. Thousands gather at the Memorial Hall in Nanjing to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, of which fewer than 200 survivors currently remain. On December 13, 1937, Japanese troops began the occupation of the then capital of China. According to the 1946-1948 Tokyo War Crimes Trials, over 300,000 Chinese were killed and at least 20,000 were raped over the course of six weeks. Hundreds of testimonies, diaries, photographs and film reels depict mass executions and brutal cases of torture and rape. Despite evidence, some Japanese officials have disputed the massacre’s legitimacy. As a formal apology has yet to be made, this disparity remains to be an underlying resentment in Sino-Japanese relations, even after 75 years have past.

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75th Anniversary of the Nanjing Massa...
Nanjing, China
By amandamustard
12 Dec 2012

Students gather at the museum's Peace Stage. Thousands gather at the Memorial Hall in Nanjing to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, of which fewer than 200 survivors currently remain. On December 13, 1937, Japanese troops began the occupation of the then capital of China. According to the 1946-1948 Tokyo War Crimes Trials, over 300,000 Chinese were killed and at least 20,000 were raped over the course of six weeks. Hundreds of testimonies, diaries, photographs and film reels depict mass executions and brutal cases of torture and rape. Despite evidence, some Japanese officials have disputed the massacre’s legitimacy. As a formal apology has yet to be made, this disparity remains to be an underlying resentment in Sino-Japanese relations, even after 75 years have past.

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75th Anniversary of the Nanjing Massa...
Nanjing, China
By amandamustard
12 Dec 2012

A candlelight ceremony is held at the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall on the eve of the 75th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, of which fewer than 200 survivors currently remain. On December 13, 1937, Japanese troops began the occupation of the then capital of China. According to the 1946-1948 Tokyo War Crimes Trials, over 300,000 Chinese were killed and at least 20,000 were raped over the course of six weeks. Hundreds of testimonies, diaries, photographs and film reels depict mass executions and brutal cases of torture and rape. Despite evidence, some Japanese officials have disputed the massacre’s legitimacy. As a formal apology has yet to be made, this disparity remains to be an underlying resentment in Sino-Japanese relations, even after 75 years have past.

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75th Anniversary of the Nanjing Massa...
Nanjing, China
By amandamustard
12 Dec 2012

A candlelight ceremony is held at the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall on the eve of the 75th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, of which fewer than 200 survivors currently remain. On December 13, 1937, Japanese troops began the occupation of the then capital of China. According to the 1946-1948 Tokyo War Crimes Trials, over 300,000 Chinese were killed and at least 20,000 were raped over the course of six weeks. Hundreds of testimonies, diaries, photographs and film reels depict mass executions and brutal cases of torture and rape. Despite evidence, some Japanese officials have disputed the massacre’s legitimacy. As a formal apology has yet to be made, this disparity remains to be an underlying resentment in Sino-Japanese relations, even after 75 years have past.

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75th Anniversary of the Nanjing Massa...
Nanjing, China
By amandamustard
12 Dec 2012

Thousands gather at the the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the 'Rape of Nanjing', of which fewer than 200 survivors currently remain. On December 13, 1937, Japanese troops began the occupation of the then capital of China. According to the 1946-1948 Tokyo War Crimes Trials, over 300,000 Chinese were killed and at least 20,000 were raped over the course of six weeks. Hundreds of testimonies, diaries, photographs and film reels depict mass executions and brutal cases of torture and rape. Despite evidence, some Japanese officials have disputed the massacre’s legitimacy. As a formal apology has yet to be made, this disparity remains to be an underlying resentment in Sino-Japanese relations, even after 75 years have past.

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A Day Of Hope
Downtown, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

She asks the government to find her husband saying, "Even if he's dead, give him to me, I want to bury him with my own hands."

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A Message For Bashar
Downtown, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

A man with a message to the Syrian president asking him to release the Lebanese hostages in the Syrian prisons who've been there for almost 15 years.

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Mothers And Sisters
Downtown, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

To date, the families of the disappeared continue to struggle for their right to know what happened to those who were taken from them. They want to know if they are still alive or, if they died, whether they can recover their remains.

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Grief Between Religions
Achrafieh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Christian and Muslim women grieve for their lost ones.

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In Memory Of
Achrafieh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Women at the cemetery gates holding flowers and their beloved's picture.

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Cemetery Mothers
Mar Metri, Achrafieh, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

It gets emotional every time they hold their pictures. They visited 3 cemeteries where the state recognized the presence of mass graves, a gesture of hope, a reminder of their past and an act of determination.

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We Have The Right To Know
Adlieh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

30 years have gone by and she still has hope of finding her, dead or alive. She demands her right to know what happened.

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Massive Grave
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Over 17,000 people disappeared during the 1975-90 Lebanese Civil War. To date, the families of the disappeared continue to struggle for their right to know what happened to those who were taken from them, if they are still alive and, if it turns out that they have died, whether they can recover their remains.

PICTURED: A woman holding her husband's photo in the cemetery.

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Compassion Among The families Of The ...
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Over 17,000 people disappeared during the 1975-90 Lebanese Civil War. To date, the families of the disappeared continue to struggle for their right to know what happened to those who were taken from them, if they are still alive and, if it turns out that they have died, whether they can recover their remains.

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Hold Him Tight
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

A woman holding a picture with tears in her eyes.

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The Sorrow Of Losing
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

There are several thousand people who were missing and forcibly disappeared in Lebanon. The great majority of them went missing during the Lebanese war (1975-1990) at the hands of Lebanese militias, as well as local and foreign armed groups.

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A Forcibly Disappeared Person
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

In Lebanon most of the missing and disappeared are civilians. Many were kidnapped from their homes, from the streets, or at checkpoints controlled by militias or foreign troops.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Amputee Sok Try takes the first few steps in his new prosthetic leg. Mr Sok lost his leg after triggering a land mine in Battambang province in 1996, since then he has had five replacements.

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Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Orthot...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

A patient takes his first few steps on his new prosthetic limb. The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Orthotics Rehabilitation Clinic helps disabled local get back on their feet, so that they provide for their families and themselves.