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Refugee Mizna Muhammad And Daughter (...
Bengahzi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
21 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Intisar Mohammad Camp Security (16-24)
Benghazi ,Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Mother And Child In Camp (17-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Children Going To Class (14-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Lonely Boy (15-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Camp School (12-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Children In School (13-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
20 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Camp Street View (8-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
19 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? Th Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Children In Refugee Camp (9-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
19 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

The kids are passing their days in th...
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
19 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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View From Refugee Camp (7-24)
Benghazi, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
19 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

They are washing the soil, day and night, hoping that it hides gold. Seventy to eighty percent of all prospectors arrive illegally from the neighboring country of Zimbabwe. The nuggets, belonging to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants. The state is left with the ground and river water no more suitable for drinking nor watering, along with the treatment of the gold diggers' damaged health. Gold rush in Manica, in the heart of Mozambique.

They are digging at a depth of 15 to 20 meters under the ground, in an extensive tunnel system.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

They are washing the soil, day and night, hoping that it hides gold. Seventy to eighty percent of all prospectors arrive illegally from the neighboring country of Zimbabwe. The nuggets, belonging to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants. The state is left with the ground and river water no more suitable for drinking nor watering, along with the treatment of the gold diggers' damaged health. Gold rush in Manica, in the heart of Mozambique.

Those who carry the sacks from the mine to the river bank walk sometimes up to 1000 meters with the bag on their head. They get 15 meticals (half of an American dollar) per sack they deliver to the river. On average, they deliver 48 to 50 sacks a day

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

They are washing the soil, day and night, hoping that it hides gold. Seventy to eighty percent of all prospectors arrive illegally from the neighboring country of Zimbabwe. The nuggets, belonging to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants. The state is left with the ground and river water no more suitable for drinking nor watering, along with the treatment of the gold diggers' damaged health. Gold rush in Manica, in the heart of Mozambique.

They build artificial bases and dams at the river bank where they wash the soil day and night to find the gold.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

They are washing the soil, day and night, hoping that it hides gold. Seventy to eighty percent of all prospectors arrive illegally from the neighboring country of Zimbabwe. The nuggets, belonging to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants. The state is left with the ground and river water no more suitable for drinking nor watering, along with the treatment of the gold diggers' damaged health. Gold rush in Manica, in the heart of Mozambique.

Today's lunch is xima, an inexpensive and popular food of many African countries, made of cassava.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

They are washing the soil, day and night, hoping that it hides gold. Seventy to eighty percent of all prospectors arrive illegally from the neighboring country of Zimbabwe. The nuggets, belonging to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants. The state is left with the ground and river water no more suitable for drinking nor watering, along with the treatment of the gold diggers' damaged health. Gold rush in Manica, in the heart of Mozambique.

The river becomes heavily polluted for they use mercury to extract the gold. The mercury comes mostly from Spain. In many cases, mercury poisoning was found in fish caught in the local rivers and sometimes even in human beings.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

Most of the gold diggers have a nomadic life with there families and keep traveling along the river where they suspect gold then set up housing and work the rivers until the next location. Mozambique 2013.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

The gold diggers wash the soil during the day and all night, hoping that it reveals the precious metal. The majority of prospectors arrive illegally from neighboring countries like Zimbabwe. The gold nuggets, belonging to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants. The state is left with the ground and rivers where the water is no longer suitable for drinking and the ground infertile. The rivers become heavily polluted from mercury used to extract the gold, poisoning aquatic life in the river and posing a serious health risks for the gold diggers. The diggers work on their own account and after selling the gold they must give half of the money to the owner of the land they found it on.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

Women are often sitting at the river side with a young children in their laps.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

The gold rush in Manica, the heart of Mozambique, has attracted the attention of workers from surrounding countries with rumors of a foreign merchants paying up to 1200 to 1300 meticals (44 to 48 American dollars) for one gram of gold. Mozambique 2013.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

Those who carry the sacks from the mine to the river bank walk up to 1000 meters with the bags on their head. They get 15 meticals (half of an American dollar) per sack they deliver to the river. On average, they deliver 48 to 50 sacks a day Mozambique 2013.

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

The gold diggers wash the soil during the day and all night, hoping that it reveals the precious metal. The majority of prospectors arrive illegally from neighboring countries like Zimbabwe. The gold nuggets, belonging to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants. A Lebanese merchant usually pays up to 1200 to 1300 meticals (44 to 48 American dollars) for one gram of gold. Mozambique 2013.

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Giving the Bird
Beirut, Lebanon
By johnny
27 Oct 2010

A young Lebanese girl "gives the bird" to unsuspecting photographer, Johnny McCallister.

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Landscape Of A Refugee Camp
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
01 Jan 2009

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Silent speak-out
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
31 Dec 2008

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Silent speak-out II
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
31 Dec 2008

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Kids against the war
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
31 Dec 2008

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Sample media
Oaxaca: Mezcal Country
New York
By Ross McDonnell
03 Oct 2007

Documenting Oaxaca's Mezcal production.

A bottle of mezcal infused with scorpions in Tlacolula de Matamoros, Oaxaca.

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Sample media
Oaxaca: Mezcal Country
New York
By Ross McDonnell
03 Oct 2007

Documenting Oaxaca's Mezcal production.

A bottle of Real Minero made with Tripón agave, a very rare agave often found in the Santa Caterina de las Minas region.

Real Minero

The palenque of Real Minero, a small production brand specializing in mezcal distilled in clay pots giving a unique flavor. It is located in the tiny pueblo of Santa Caterina de las Minas in Oaxaca

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Single Mom in London 2
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
27 Sep 2007

five-year-old Hassan, son of single mother Kelly.