Frame 0004
Iraqi Visitors
Baghdad
By Hasan N. Alhasson
12 May 2015

Video Shows Iraqi Shias visiting the shrine of Imam Musa al-Kazim in Baghdad to commemorate his death.

Transcription

Soundbite, Man - خادم الزائرين

مناسبة للشيعة عامة وفاة الامام موسى ابن جعفر ونتحدى الارهاب ونتحدى داعش ونتحدى القاعدة ونتحدى الوهابية

سؤال: كم هو عدد الزوار تقريباً؟

والله أنا لي ٤ ايام بايت في هذا الموكب ما يقارب أكثر من ١٠ ملايين دخلت من هالمكان

سؤال: ماذا جئت تفعل هنا

احنا هنا نخدم الزوار في موكب أهل البيت السادة الحيدرية

Soundbite - Man - One of the visitors
الين جار عليهم بالسوط والعذابات أوجه لهم كلمة أن ينتهزوا هاي الفرصة بالدعاء الى شعب العراق والى كل المؤمنين والمؤمنات وأن يتغمد شهدائنا بالرحمة وأن يمنّ على المرضى والجرحى بالشفاء العاجل آمين يا رب العالمين وأن يكشف الغمة عن هه الأمة وأن يحفظنا من كل شر ومكروه بحق محمد وآله الطيبين آمبن يا رب العالمين

Soundbite - Man -
باسم الله الرحمن الرحيم نعزي صاحب العصر والزمان والمراجع العظام بهذا المصاب الجلل وهو مصاب الامام موسى ابن جعفر عليه السلام

سؤال: ما هي الرسالة التي تريدون إيصالها من خلال هذه الزيارة المليونية؟

احنا نريد نبين من خلال هذه الزيارة أن العراق انشاالله يمر بظروف طيبة وهاي الناس الطيبة المؤمنة ودحراً للإرهاب لعنة الله على كل إرهابي

سؤال: التفجيرات التي حدثت هل أثرت على عدد الزوار؟

بالعكس زادت من عزيمة الزوار هذه انشالله ما تضعف عزيمة الزوار

سؤال: ماذا تمثل هذه الزيارة؟ هذه الزيارة تمثل الشعائر التي يتمثل بها قوله تعالى ومن يعظّم شعائر الله تلك من تقوى القلوب

Frame 0004
Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
20 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war. The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters. Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo. In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon. The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

Frame 0004
Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

Frame 0004
Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abbas al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander:

Abbas al-Asadi: “I will be heading to Samaraa, after this interview a car will come and pick us up and we will go there.

Interviewer: Did you just return from Samaraa for this interview?

Abbas: “No, I came to see my family but they [Army commanders] called me and told me to return. I am now in the army fighting ISIS but I need to return. They need me there. I took a few days off and went there, but now they need me, they called me and I have to return.”

Interviewer: Don't you think you are breaking the Norwegian law, or technically the law in all of Europe, by letting your children participate in war?

Abbas: “I will not break the Norwegian law or the Arabic law. My children came with me after the area was liberated, after the area became safe and the families returned to it. But my little child likes to wear my uniform and I taught him how to shoot just so he can have some experience. But he does not participate in war with me. I know he cannot participate in war, war is not for him.”

Interviewer: The last time we met with them, your children told us that they participated in war and in victories and in fighting ISIS. What is the reason for such statements?

Abbas: “He considers himself to be one with his father, and since his father participated and he entered Jurf al-Sakher after it was liberated, he considered himself as a participant. Of course he did not participate in the battles in Jurf al-Sakher, do you think I would want death for my son? It is impossible.”

Interviewer: When was the last time you went to Norway?

Abbas: “I was there last in 2008.”

Interviewer: Do you intend to return to Norway and if so, when?

Abbas: “Yes I intend to return to Norway, after the war with ISIS ends.”

Interviewer: How many are in your family?

Abbas: “Some of them are living in Oslo, and I have another son who is a doctor in America. According to our beliefs, a person who leaves jihad is an infidel. We ask God to help us and support us.”

Interviewer: Is your wife pleased with what you are doing?

Abbas: “Yes my wife is proud of me because I am fighting with the good people against the enemies.”
Interviewer: What do you want to tell the Norwegian government and the European Union who might think that you brought your son to participate in war?
Abbas: “I did not and will not involve my son in war, I repeat that, I did not and will not involve any of my youngest children in war. They go to school.. just like in anywhere else. When we liberated the area, many people and journalists came and my son was one of those people. He wanted to wear my uniform, and I allowed him to. It has nothing to do with war. We fought him the Arabic traditions, such as shooting, horseback riding, and other simple things. If a war happens in Norway, God forbid, I am willing to fight alongside them. If Norway or Europe needs me to fight, I will definitely help them. Norway is my country and Iraq is my country.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

Thumb sm
Yazidi Refugees Find Shelter in Turkey
Midyat
By emrerende
05 Sep 2014

Up to to 16.000 Yazidi refugees have found shelter in Turkey after fleeing the Islamic state onslaught in and around Sinjar in mid-August, 2014. Many have been accommodated in camps set up by Turkey's governmental relief agency. Turkey says it will soon be ready to open three new refugee camps in northern Iraq for Yazidis and Turkmen fleeing violence in Iraq. The government says it has already spent more than 3.5 billion dollars looking after Syrian refugees and is asking the international community to shoulder some of the burden when it comes to refugees from Syria and Iraq.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Along the roads of the city, in buildings still under construction, you can see hundreds of groups of Yazidis looking for shelter, creating shelters inside the skeletons of buildings, awaiting humanitarian aid. This situation is especially difficult for children and the elderly.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Diyarbakir, Turkey
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

One part of the Yazidi community has been able to pass through the border in northern Iraq with Turkey. The city of Diyarbakir, a Kurdish-majority city, has opened two schools to assist refugees with first aid provided by local associations. The number of refugees within this structure is about 700 people.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Bardarash, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

For the Iraqi woman who finds herself with dependent children and without a male figure at her side, security becomes a constant worry in addition to the emotional and psychological destruction visited on them by the Islamic State. Keeping in touch with friends and relatives helps distract them and maintain a sense of community.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The living conditions of minorities persecuted by the advance of Islamic State militants can be read on the faces of refugees no matter their age. Despite this extreme hardship, the hope that their children will be able to build a better future keeps them going.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Forced migration is in some cases synonymous with survival. These women were found after escaping from an armed group. Young and old, none of them are safe, they say.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

During mealtime, volunteers bring sandwiches and water to refugees. Children play, running between the reinforced concrete pillars of the bridge, left to themselves. The refugees here are waiting for the Duhok municipality to place them in a refugee camp.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Yazidi refugees from the €‹Sinjar area live under bridges along one of the main arteries in Duhok. Sulayman, 42, had a hard escape. He is the only one who speaks English and has managed to keep open relations with humanitarian organizations monitoring the situation where women have no privacy and the water is retrieved from a nearby mosque.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Yazidi refugees tend to move in groups according to their city of origin. Some hotels offer rooms at a fixed cost. In this Hotel refugees pay 600 Iraqi dinars per month no matter now many people reside in the room. Those with the means may even request air conditioning and fresh water.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Lalish, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

A temple sacred to the Yazidi is used as a shelter by refugees arriving from Mount Sinjar. The checkpoints and militarization of the place does not calm their fears that future attacks by the Islamic State can take place. Every inch of the stone temple donning Yazidi symbols of worship is used to shelter a trembling people.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The days become monotonous, as the women constantly prepare meals, clean dishes and wash clothes. The rest of the time the mind is free to worry about what might still happen and get lost in the melancholy of a sectarian war in progress.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Many Yazidi mothers have lost their children on the way to escape from Mount Sinjar during the advance of the Islamic State militia in the plain of Nineveh, but life must go on in spite of the constant pain and the uncertainty of their future.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

After two hundred Yazidi women were kidnapped and converted to Islam to be sold by IS militants, the Yazidi community worries that it can happen again, visible scars on the community of the women who were persecuted.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Arsalam, 38, is the father of 5 children, including two newborn twins. His family comes from Bashiqua and hosts 24 people in 2 rooms of their hotel. Insecurity is always present on the faces of the guests who do not feel at home, even though they are certainly better off than those refugees who are forced to stay on the streets.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Duhok is estimated to host between 200 and 300 thousand refugees. Aid by the international community is slow to arrive, so local volunteers do their best to care for refugees. Women gather in front of an ambulance to have their children examined by doctors and receive treatment.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Diyarbakir, Turkey
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

Inside one of the schools occupied by refugees, volunteers from a local association manage to bring aid to women and children. They ask women of the community every day for a list of products they need. Women collect lunches brought by the municipality and men distribute them to the entire community.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

After attacks by the Islamic State on Mount Sinjar which is located between the north east of Iraq and Syria, minorities have tried to reach places of safety both in northern Iraq and in Turkey. About 120 thousand people managed to escape with the help of Syrian Kurds (YPG) and the air support of the United States.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

A mother of three cares for a daughter who suffers from Down syndrome. She has many fears and many anxieties about the future, abandoning her old life, and how best to care for her daughter.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

A Yazidi woman prepares water inside a tub to wash the younger children. Harsh conditions make caring for children difficult.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

Refugee women and girls cooperate to best manage day to day life, sharing duties and caring for the younger children.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Bardarash, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

In this makeshift refuge, the little ones spend most of their hours stretched out on the floor in the corridors or in empty classrooms of the school.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

A Yazidi woman walked for days to escape from Mount Sinjar and the threat of the militia of the Islamic State. When she arrived in Duhok, she gave birth to a son with the help of older women in the community. The child is at risk due to high temperatures, the shortage of medicines and an unhygienic place to live.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

Yazidi refugees take shelter in a garage building. A woman, aided by her sons, tends to their makeshift house inside the garage.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

Aid from local associations has not been enough to support the Shabak community living in Rovia's mosque. A woman needs to move for the night between the cars parked outside.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

Recognized as an ethnic minority in 1952, the Shabak are now on the run from the militias of the Islamic State. They have already experienced persecution in the past, notably by the regime of Saddam Hussein. 70 families of them take refuge in this mosque from their latest threat.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

A Shabak man is sick, lying on a rug while a woman tends to him, as the public hospital can only be reached in the morning. During the day, temperatures reach around 45 degrees.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

An elderly woman prepares to cook dinner, shielding the fire with wooden panels. Inside the mosque there is no pavement, making hygiene a challenge.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Bardarash, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

Bardarash, 30 km from Mosul, has a Muslim majority. Here, the municipality helped Shabak families take shelter in schools. Young Shabak girls prepare food in one of the classrooms, temporarily used as a kitchen.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

In the tiny village of Rovia a few miles from Mosul, a city currently under control of the Islamic State, the Shabak community has found refuge in a mosque under construction. Inside the community, the proportion of children to adults is very high. The adults hope to spare their children from the psychological trauma of war.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Lalish, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

The temple Lalish is situated to the north of Mosul. It is a place of pilgrimage and an important sanctuary for Yazidis. After IS captured Bashiqua and other nearby villages, many people have sought refuge at the temple monitored by Peshmerga fighters who control the entire district of Sherkan. The Yazidi community has opened its doors to refugees allowing them to settle down within the sacred place, aided by NGOs providing tents and relief supplies.

Thumb sm
Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

Shabak women are preparing for the evening meal in a mosque along the road that leads to Mosul. With only moonlight available, people who sleep outside must cook, eat, and wash quickly.

Thumb sm
Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga Forces in Kir...
By Nwenar Fatih
12 Jun 2014

An abandoned Iraqi Army position near Kirkuk on June 12, 2014

Thumb sm
Serekaniye or Ras al Ayn (3 of 17)
Ras al Ain, Syria
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
24 Apr 2013

April 24, 2013. Abu Ahmed, originally from Iraq, demonstrates on a passing neighbor girl how to behead someone. "With these hands I cannot hold my wife or my baby. My hands are dirty. When I fight, I go crazy. ... shows a video on his phone where he is seen torturing and beheading a shabiha ... After fighting, the next day, I look in my phone, and only then I realize what I did. I love the killing."