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Herbal High (14 of 18)
Eastleigh Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
09 Jun 2013

Somali families monopolise the export of khat to Europe in Kenya. They create links with Somalis in UK and send initial supplies based on trust.

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Herbal High (13 of 18)
Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
09 Jun 2013

Kenyan packer boxing khat in a warehouse in Kenya's Somali district, Eastleigh

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Kinshasa Street Children (33 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (27 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (23 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (22 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa-Democratic Republic of Congo-09-06-2013- The problem of street children in Kinshasa, continue to rise, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children have been housed and rehabilitated by a National government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers”, meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or the accusation of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing of petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Herbal High (18 of 18)
Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
26 May 2013

Kenyan labourers pack bunches of khat into banana leaves so they can be shipped to the UK. Sacks of khat arrive to Eastleigh at 2pm on a daily basis. The shrub and is ordered and bundled with the customer's name written on their sack. Local vendors then collect their parcels and sell them to local chewers. Khat is a a leafy stimulant native to the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. In these areas, khat chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. May, 2013.

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Herbal High (15 of 18)
Eastleigh Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
19 May 2013

20 boxes loaded with khat are ready to be sent to the UK

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Herbal High (17 of 18)
Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
19 May 2013

Kenyan labourers package khat for the UK. Somalis own the export business, but Kenyans are used as cheap labour.

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Herbal High (16 of 18)
Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
19 May 2013

A young Kenyan carries boxes of khat to a large truck headed for Nairobi's biggest airport. Four days a week, shipments of khat are sent to the UK for Somali diaspora communities. Khat is a a leafy stimulant native to the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. In these areas, khat chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. May, 2013.

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Herbal High (5 of 18)
Eastleigh Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
12 May 2013

Liban Olow chewed Khat everyday for 30 years. "I began to lose my memory. I sometimes forgot the names of my own children. When you chew, your priority is not providing food for your family. I used to chew and stay awake for 72 hours. if we ban Khat, then we would have a working nation, rather than a sleeping nation."

For one bunch of the best quality khat is $40 which is often shared between two people. Although for a bag of just the leaves, it can be as cheap as $1 a bag.

Local khat vendors come to Eastleigh to sell the stimulant as Somalis are their biggest customers. “I live outside, not here. Khat is more of a Somali thing, but I have to chew to show people it is not a bad thing,” says a local Kenyan trader.

Khat is also distributed within Nairobi. It is farmed in Meru and arrives in Eastleigh at 2pm everyday. It is preordered and bundled with the customers name written on their sack. Local vendors then collect their parcels and sell to local chewers.

The Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) in the UK reports that more than 2,500 tonnes, worth about £13.8m, was imported by the UK in 2011/12, bringing in £2.8m of tax revenues. Khat is still legal in the UK, even though it has been banned by the US and other European countries. Khat is shipped to the UK four days a week from Kenya.

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Herbal High (9 of 18)
Eastleigh Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
11 Mar 2013

Sacks of khat arrive to Eastleigh at 2pm on a daily basis. The shrub and is ordered and bundled with the customer's name written on their sack. Local vendors then collect their parcels and sell them to local chewers. Khat is a a leafy stimulant native to the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. In these areas, khat chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. March, 2013.

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Herbal High (10 of 18)
Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya
By Celeste Hibbert
10 Mar 2013

Khat is sold for relatively cheap prices. One bunch of the best quality khat which is often shared between two people costs $40. A bag of just the leaves can be as cheap as $1 a bag. Sacks of khat arrive to Eastleigh at 2pm on a daily basis. The shrub and is ordered and bundled with the customer's name written on their sack. Local vendors then collect their parcels and sell them to local chewers. Khat is a a leafy stimulant native to the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. In these areas, khat chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. March, 2013.