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A Hero For The Strays
Alor Star, Malaysia
By U.S. Editor
11 Mar 2013

Md Azmi Ismail, 55, also known as Pak Mie and his wife Halijah Idris, better known as Mak Intan, 65, are both animal lovers. For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife have been tending to the needs of stray animals, especially dogs with diseases such as mange and cataracts.

With their combined love to care for animals in need, the couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near the the river in Tanjung Bendshara. The shelter that has been operating for the past 4 years 450 km’s away from Kuala Lumpur. The couple have put in their savings to run the shelter and take donations from campaigning on social media sites such as facebook or via word of mouth. Their facebook page alone has become popular with nearly 5000 “friends” pledging their support to the shelter.

The married couple, volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are also attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals such as dogs should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden. It is acceptable to have a dog as a guard or for hunting but not as a pet, particularly not a domestic pet.

Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip. They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money. They have also been accused of mistreating the animals and torturing them. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations putting forward that it was only until a video about the center went viral on the internet that they started to receive public donations. Prior to that the family ran the center with their own money.

The Pak Mie shelter now tends to over 700 dogs, over 100 cats, as well as exotic animals such as foxes, squirrels and monkeys in a 200 meters x 30 meters compound shelter. Pak Mie feeds them with at least 5 large bags of rice taking him 3-4 hours to feed them.

The shelter is now family operated bringing in his son to help. Contrary to their efforts the shelter is under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners and local land authorities.

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Heroes for the Strays (1 of 30)
Alor star, Malaysia
By syahrin
11 Mar 2013

-Pak Mie prepares food for his dogs.

For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife Mak Intan have been tending to the needs of stray animals suffering from diseases such as mange or cataracts.

The couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near a river in Tanjung Bendshara. Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip.

They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money and accused of mistreating the animals. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations. The center was only recently running on public donations. Prior to this the family ran the center with their own money.

The married couple volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals, such as dogs, should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden.

Contrary to the couple's efforts,the shelter is currently under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure by landowners.

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Spare Materials
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

Refugees rely on support from the local Lebanese community for their existence. A lack of aid to the region means shelters are constructed from any materials the local people can spare.

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Inside A Makeshift Shelter
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

A living space inside a makeshift Syrian shelter.

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Living Space Inside A Refugee Shelter
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

A makeshift Syrian home, many of the items seen here have been donated from the local community.

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Living Space Inside A Shelter
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

A room for washing and cooking inside a makeshift Syrian shelter.

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Modern Services Run To A Makeshift Sh...
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

A makeshift shelter, connected to intermittent electricity via a cable in the street for Syrian refugees.

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Construction Site
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

This half-finished building has become a home to Syrian families escaping the bloodshed. It has no windows or doors and provides shelter to around eight families.

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Construction Of Makeshift Shelter
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

On arrival at the camps, refugees construct makeshift wooden framed shelters.

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Men Construct A Shelter
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

New arrivals from Syria build shelters in the Bekaa Valley, Lebanon.

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The Rise Of The Anonymous (13 of 13)
Tehran, Iran
By Hanif
09 Feb 2013

6 March 2013 – Activist women of Toloo prepare foods which will be distributed among homeless people.

"The Rise Of The Anonymous" institute includes more than 3000 members which every week between 100-150 members activate in it and about 2000 warm meals are distributed by this institute to homelesses every week.

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January 25th Clashes in Cairo (9 of 10)
Cairo, Egypt
By mgdowney
25 Jan 2013

A group of young men take shelter behind a make-shift shelter of scrap metal while exchanging volleys of rocks with the police. For most of the youth taking part in the clashes, it's more of a game, as they jump out to throw a firebomb or rock many are laughing and enjoying the chaos.

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Israeli Boys In Shrapnel Shelter
Siderot, Israel
By kkoponen
17 Nov 2012

Little boys play in a concrete shrapnel shelter in Sderot, southern Israel. These shelters are everywhere in Sderot which is only a few kilometers from Gaza and frequently targeted by Hamas' rockets.

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Roni Keidar in her living room
Erez, israel
By javiervidela
16 Nov 2012

Roni Keidar in her living room. While we were doing the interview, the sounds of bombing in Gaza made the house shakes every minute, and we heard the israeli alarm "Red Color" sound almost every 20 minutes. When we hear the alarm, we have 15 seconds to hide in the shelter.

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Gas Masks in the shelter
Erez, Israel
By javiervidela
16 Nov 2012

Couple of boxes of gas masks in the shelter of Roni Keidar's House.

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Roni Keidar's house
Erez, israel
By javiervidela
16 Nov 2012

The house of Roni is completely empty. Her family of two daughters and her gradsons was sent far away from rockets, for their own safety.

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Roni Keidar and her husband hiding in...
Erez, israel
By javiervidela
16 Nov 2012

Every time the "Red Color" alarm sets off in the neighborhood, warning of a rocket sent from Gaza to the area, the couple have 15 seconds to hide in the shelter. A rocket crashed onto the house roof three weeks ago.

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Israeli Couple at the Borders of Gaza
Erez, Israel
By Mais Istanbuli
16 Nov 2012

Roni Keidar, the worker at the Israeli organization "The Other Voice" and her husband, talking about their experience with the war between Gaza and Israel.

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Family
Bamako, Mali
By bindra
16 Sep 2012

Families from Gao and Kidal prepare food together in the compound they share together in Bamako. Many displaced say they are in need of adequate shelter, food and clean water.

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The boy
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
01 Apr 2010

An estimated number of five million illegal migrants live and work in the European Union. A number growing with at least 500.000 each year, despite great efforts by the EU, and in particularly the border states Spain, Greece and Italy, to prevent them from entering the EU.
In an area in the outskirts of Calais which goes by the name “the jungle", Afghan children and adolescents as young as 12 years of age, wash themselves in the waste water of the local factory.
They seek shelter and try to keep warm under blankets in the bushes and in tents donated by local charity organizations. It has been a very long and harsh winter. Should the migrants by any chance have assumed to have reached a peaceful place to rest after fleeing the war in Afghanistan, they have very soon been met by a quiet different reality. In the jungle of Calais the Afghan boys also seek shelter from a different power: the local riot police.

This young afghan boy is 12 years old and have done the trip from Afghanistan on his own.

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Fort Europa 2
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
03 Mar 2010

An estimated number of five million illegal migrants live and work in the European Union. A number growing with at least 500.000 each year, despite great efforts by the EU, and in particularly the border states Spain, Greece and Italy, to prevent them from entering the EU.
In an area in the outskirts of Calais which goes by the name “the jungle", Afghan children and adolescents as young as 12 years of age, wash themselves in the waste water of the local factory.
They seek shelter and try to keep warm under blankets in the bushes and in tents donated by local charity organizations. It has been a very long and harsh winter. Should the migrants by any chance have assumed to have reached a peaceful place to rest after fleeing the war in Afghanistan, they have very soon been met by a quiet different reality. In the jungle of Calais the Afghan boys also seek shelter from a different power: the local riot police.