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Wounded Free Syrian Army Soldier
aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

A wounded Free Syrian Army soldier arrived at a hospital after having been shot by a sniper in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Wounded Free Syrian Army Soldier
aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

Doctors aid a wounded Free Syrian Army soldier who arrived at a hospital after having been shot by a sniper in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Wounded Free Syrian Army Soldier
aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

A wounded Free Syrian Army soldier arrived at a hospital after having been shot by a sniper in Aleppo, Syria, May 2013.

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Wounded Free Syrian Army Soldier
Aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

A wounded Free Syrian Army soldier arrived at a hospital after having been shot by a sniper in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Wounded Free Syrian Army Soldier
aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

A doctor attempted to remove a bullet from a wounded Free Syrian Army soldier's back after he arrived at a hospital having been shot by a sniper in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Wounded Free Syrian Army Soldier
aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

Doctors aided a wounded Free Syrian Army soldier who arrived at a hospital after having been shot by a sniper in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Wounded Free Syrian Army Soldier
Aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

A wounded Free Syrian Army soldier being aided during an X-Ray procedure after he arrived at a hospital having been shot by a sniper in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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X-Ray of Bullet in Wounded Free Syria...
Aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

An X-Ray revealed a bullet in the chest of a wounded Free Syrian Army soldier who arrived at a hospital having been shot by a sniper in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Emergnecy Room Aftermath Aleppo
Aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

The remnants of material in an emergency room after doctors treated a wounded Free Syrian Army soldier in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Doctor Asleep in the Deserted Top Flo...
Aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

A Syrian doctor slipped away from a 48 hour shift in the ER to a room in the hospital that has been deserted by staff and patients because of intense sniper fire in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Relatives Visiting Wounded in Aleppo ...
Aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

Relatives visited their family member who was shot by a sniper in a hospital in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Doctor on Break Aleppo
Aleppo
By Simon Letellier
26 May 2013

A doctor watches TV between surgeries after an airstrike nearby brought a constant flow of wounded victims to the hospital. The routine of the doctor's life in this hospital is around the clock work with little rest between ER shifts in Aleppo, Syria, May, 2013.

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Spanish Conqueror's Remains Found in ...
Mexico City, Mexico
By @LatAmSight
13 May 2013

Spaniard conqueror Hernán Cortez Tomb
by: Pablo Perez
Jesus' Hospital, located in downtown Mexico City, a few blocks from the Zocalo, was founded by Spaniard conqueror Hernán Cortéz in 1520, in the place where there had been his first encounter with Mexican Cacique Moctezuma, to take care of the marginal people.
This It is the oldest operating hospital in America and the third largest worldwide. The hospital keeps dedicated to social assistance and is managed by a board that was headed until 1932 by descendants of Cortéz, who held the noble title of Marquis of the Oaxaca Valley.
Cortez's remains rest in a church next to the Jesus' hospital, which for a long time depended of a patronage given trough a bull awarded by Pope Clement VII. These remains went through several churches in Spain and Mexico before its current location, where were hidden for more than 100 years, for fear that their desecration. Both, the the Cortez tomb as the foundation of the hospital are unknown for most of the Mexico City inhabitants.

La Tumba de Hernán Cortéz

El Hospital de Jesús, situado en el centro de la Ciudad de México a unas cuadras del Zócalo, fue fundado por Hernán Cortéz en 1520 para la atención de la población marginada en el lugar donde había tenido lugar su primer encuentro personal con Moctezuma. Es el hospital en funcionamiento más antiguo de América y el tercero del mundo. Se sigue dedicando a la asistencia social y está gestionado por un patronato que estuvo encabezado hasta 1932 por los descendientes de Cortés, que ostentaban el título nobiliario de marqueses del Valle de Oaxaca.
En una iglesia anexa al hospital, que durante mucho tiempo y gracias a una bula papal de Clemente VII dependió del patronato, se encuentran los restos de Hernán Cortés. Estos restos pasaron por varias iglesias en España y México antes de su lugar actual y estuvieron escondidos en ese mismo templo durante más de 100 años por temor a que fueran profanados. Tanto la presencia de la tumba como la fundación del hospital por Cortés son desconocidos entre la mayor parte de los vecinos de la ciudad de México.

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THE FIGHT AGAINST MALARIA: DR ALBERT ...
Lambarene, Gabon
By serengeti1 serengeti1
10 May 2013

100 years ago te Albert Schweitzer Hospital was established on the banks of the Ogooue River, in Lambarene, Gabon. Today its Medical Research Unit leads the charge to discover an antidote against a scourge that kills hundreds of thousands of people - many of them children - in Africa each year. That scourge is called malaria, carried by Anopheles mosquitos.

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Imran Khan's Final Election Rally in ...
Islamabad, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
09 May 2013

Thousands of people attended an election rally held by PTI in Islamabad. Imran Khan, the former cricketer and chairman of PTI addressed his followers via video link from his hospital bed.

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

In the octagonal communal garden at the centre of Benghazi’s Al Nafsia drug addiction clinic four men sit quietly talking in the shade. The atmosphere of contemplation makes the clinic seem like an oasis of calm in a city where assassination attempts and armed raids are a monthly occurrence and the soundscape is regularly punctuated by gunshots and squealing tires.

Here Libyans with addiction problems are helped to kick their habits with the help of psychologists and tailor made drug courses. The only problem: this clinic has room for just 40 inpatients, and it is the only treatment centre of its kind in a country where drug addiction is rapidly increasing.

Doctors across Libya say they are being overwhelmed by patients with drug problems and it is proving impossible to provide appropriate treatment for everyone.

‘Every month more people come to us needing help,’ says Dr Abdullah Fannar, deputy director at Tripoli’s Gargaresh psychiatric hospital. ‘It’s part of the fallout from the revolution. The government security forces are weak and hundreds of thousands of Libyans were displaced, wounded or bereaved during the uprising. Now street drugs are proving to be an attractive solution to many of those who are struggling to deal with their new reality.’

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

In the octagonal communal garden at the centre of Benghazi’s Al Nafsia drug addiction clinic four men sit quietly talking in the shade. The atmosphere of contemplation makes the clinic seem like an oasis of calm in a city where assassination attempts and armed raids are a monthly occurrence and the soundscape is regularly punctuated by gunshots and squealing tires.

Here Libyans with addiction problems are helped to kick their habits with the help of psychologists and tailor made drug courses. The only problem: this clinic has room for just 40 inpatients, and it is the only treatment centre of its kind in a country where drug addiction is rapidly increasing.

Doctors across Libya say they are being overwhelmed by patients with drug problems and it is proving impossible to provide appropriate treatment for everyone.

‘Every month more people come to us needing help,’ says Dr Abdullah Fannar, deputy director at Tripoli’s Gargaresh psychiatric hospital. ‘It’s part of the fallout from the revolution. The government security forces are weak and hundreds of thousands of Libyans were displaced, wounded or bereaved during the uprising. Now street drugs are proving to be an attractive solution to many of those who are struggling to deal with their new reality.’

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

In the octagonal communal garden at the centre of Benghazi’s Al Nafsia drug addiction clinic four men sit quietly talking in the shade. The atmosphere of contemplation makes the clinic seem like an oasis of calm in a city where assassination attempts and armed raids are a monthly occurrence and the soundscape is regularly punctuated by gunshots and squealing tires.

Here Libyans with addiction problems are helped to kick their habits with the help of psychologists and tailor made drug courses. The only problem: this clinic has room for just 40 inpatients, and it is the only treatment centre of its kind in a country where drug addiction is rapidly increasing.

Doctors across Libya say they are being overwhelmed by patients with drug problems and it is proving impossible to provide appropriate treatment for everyone.

‘Every month more people come to us needing help,’ says Dr Abdullah Fannar, deputy director at Tripoli’s Gargaresh psychiatric hospital. ‘It’s part of the fallout from the revolution. The government security forces are weak and hundreds of thousands of Libyans were displaced, wounded or bereaved during the uprising. Now street drugs are proving to be an attractive solution to many of those who are struggling to deal with their new reality.’

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

Mohamed
Addicted to pharmaceuticals including Tramadol, Diazepam, and Bromisoval
From Benghazi
Has spent 1 month at the clinic
  ‘I started taking Tramadol in 2006. At first it gives you energy and stops you feeling tired. After taking for a long time you get very depressed and frustrated. You get aches all over your body, irritable and angry. Before I came to the hospital I’d been taking Tramadol regularly for five years. I couldn’t take it anymore. I want to turn around my life and feel jealous of my friends who never tried the pills.’  

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

Islam
Addicted to Tramadol
From Benghazi
Has spent one month in the clinic

‘I was skateboarding a lot and started taking Tramadol because it means you can skate for longer and don’t get tired.’

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

Rafah
Addicted to heroin and alcohol
From Benghazi
Has spent two weeks at the clinic

‘Bokha is made out of figs. You mash them all up and the heat the mixure for 15 days in a big barrel. It froths up and eventually the end liquid comes dripping out of a tube from the top. It’s illegal but all kinds of people drink it all over Libya.’

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

Rafah
Addicted to heroin and alcohol
From Benghazi
Has spent two weeks at the clinic

‘Bokha is made out of figs. You mash them all up and the heat the mixure for 15 days in a big barrel. It froths up and eventually the end liquid comes dripping out of a tube from the top. It’s illegal but all kinds of people drink it all over Libya.’

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

Esam
Addicted to heroin
From Tripoli
Has spent 3 weeks at the clinic

‘If you needed a fix back in the old days, there was a place in Tripoli’s medina where you could put your arm through a hole in the wall with the money in the palm of your hand and you’d receive the injection.

Gaddafi is the reason for the prevalence of HIV amongst drug users. Gaddafi made selling needles to suspected addicts a crime, forcing us to share.’

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

Mohamed
Addicted to pharmaceuticals including Tramadol, Diazepam, and Bromisoval
From Benghazi
Has spent 1 month at the clinic

'I started taking Tramadol in 2006. At first, it gives you energy and you stop feeling tired. After taking the drug for a long time you get very depressed and frustrated. You get aches all over your body. You also become irritable and angry. Before I came to the hospital, I’d been taking Tramadol regularly for five years. I couldn’t take it anymore. I wanted to turn my life around and feel jealous of my friends who never tried the pills'

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

Mohamed
Addicted to pharmaceuticals including Tramadol, Diazepam, and Bromisoval
From Benghazi
Has spent 1 month at the clinic

‘I started taking Tramadol in 2006. At first it gives you energy and stops you feeling tired. After taking for a long time you get very depressed and frustrated. You get aches all over your body, irritable and angry. Before I came to the hospital I’d been taking Tramadol regularly for five years. I couldn’t take it anymore. I want to turn around my life and feel jealous of my friends who never tried the pills.’

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

Ali
Addicted to Tramadol
From Sebha
Has spent 1 month at the clinic

‘It spreads through schools. My neighbour gave me the first pill. He said it would make me feel powerful. It spreads through groups of friends. After a long time the side effects are very bad I was suffering from aches all over my body, insomnia and uncontrollable anger.

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

In the octagonal communal garden at the centre of Benghazi’s Al Nafsia drug addiction clinic four men sit quietly talking in the shade. The atmosphere of contemplation makes the clinic seem like an oasis of calm in a city where assassination attempts and armed raids are a monthly occurrence and the soundscape is regularly punctuated by gunshots and squealing tires.

Here Libyans with addiction problems are helped to kick their habits with the help of psychologists and tailor made drug courses. The only problem: this clinic has room for just 40 inpatients, and it is the only treatment centre of its kind in a country where drug addiction is rapidly increasing.

Doctors across Libya say they are being overwhelmed by patients with drug problems and it is proving impossible to provide appropriate treatment for everyone.

‘Every month more people come to us needing help,’ says Dr Abdullah Fannar, deputy director at Tripoli’s Gargaresh psychiatric hospital. ‘It’s part of the fallout from the revolution. The government security forces are weak and hundreds of thousands of Libyans were displaced, wounded or bereaved during the uprising. Now street drugs are proving to be an attractive solution to many of those who are struggling to deal with their new reality.’

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

In the octagonal communal garden at the centre of Benghazi’s Al Nafsia drug addiction clinic four men sit quietly talking in the shade. The atmosphere of contemplation makes the clinic seem like an oasis of calm in a city where assassination attempts and armed raids are a monthly occurrence and the soundscape is regularly punctuated by gunshots and squealing tires.

Here Libyans with addiction problems are helped to kick their habits with the help of psychologists and tailor made drug courses. The only problem: this clinic has room for just 40 inpatients, and it is the only treatment centre of its kind in a country where drug addiction is rapidly increasing.

Doctors across Libya say they are being overwhelmed by patients with drug problems and it is proving impossible to provide appropriate treatment for everyone.

‘Every month more people come to us needing help,’ says Dr Abdullah Fannar, deputy director at Tripoli’s Gargaresh psychiatric hospital. ‘It’s part of the fallout from the revolution. The government security forces are weak and hundreds of thousands of Libyans were displaced, wounded or bereaved during the uprising. Now street drugs are proving to be an attractive solution to many of those who are struggling to deal with their new reality.’

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

In the octagonal communal garden at the centre of Benghazi’s Al Nafsia drug addiction clinic four men sit quietly talking in the shade. The atmosphere of contemplation makes the clinic seem like an oasis of calm in a city where assassination attempts and armed raids are a monthly occurrence and the soundscape is regularly punctuated by gunshots and squealing tires.

Here Libyans with addiction problems are helped to kick their habits with the help of psychologists and tailor made drug courses. The only problem: this clinic has room for just 40 inpatients, and it is the only treatment centre of its kind in a country where drug addiction is rapidly increasing.

Doctors across Libya say they are being overwhelmed by patients with drug problems and it is proving impossible to provide appropriate treatment for everyone.

‘Every month more people come to us needing help,’ says Dr Abdullah Fannar, deputy director at Tripoli’s Gargaresh psychiatric hospital. ‘It’s part of the fallout from the revolution. The government security forces are weak and hundreds of thousands of Libyans were displaced, wounded or bereaved during the uprising. Now street drugs are proving to be an attractive solution to many of those who are struggling to deal with their new reality.’

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggles
Benghazi, Libya
By Mais Istanbuli
15 Apr 2013

There’s a light sheen of sweat across Mohamed’s face as he recounts his story. ‘I first tried Tramadol more than five years ago with my friends. We’d take the pills and go to coffee shops or play music. At first it was great. It mellows you out, gives you energy and makes you feel strong. But you end up needing more and more. After a while you start to get aches all over your body. You get crazy mood swings and feel like you can’t control your own life.’
Mohamed’s tale is one that is all too familiar to the staff at Benghazi’s Al Nafsia drug addiction clinic. We’re sitting in a shady spot in the octagonal communal garden that lies at the centre of clinic. The atmosphere of contemplation makes it seem like an oasis of calm in a city where assassination attempts and armed raids are a monthly occurrence and the sound of gunshots regularly punctuates the afternoon haze. At the Nafsia clinic Libyans with addiction problems are helped to kick their habits with the help of psychologists and tailor-made drug courses. The only problem: this clinic has room for just 40 inpatients, and it is the only treatment centre of its kind in a country where drug addiction is rapidly increasing. Doctors across Libya say they are being overwhelmed by patients with drug problems and it is proving impossible to provide appropriate treatment. ‘Every month more people come to us needing help,’ says Dr Abdullah Fannir, deputy director at Tripoli’s Gargaresh psychiatric hospital. ‘It’s part of the fallout from the revolution. Border control is weak making it easy for drug traffickers, and there’s more demand as well. Hundreds of thousands of Libyans were displaced, wounded or bereaved during the uprising. Now street drugs are proving to be an attractive solution to many of those who are struggling to deal with their new reality.’

Drugs and stability

Due to Libya’s weak institutions and the stigma attached to drug taking there are no official statistics on drug use and there have been very few studies. Last June a study published by the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine revealed that the percentage of HIV positive injecting drug users stood at 87%, the highest recorded anywhere in the world. Responding to the report last year the Libyan government said that it would treat the HIV and drug crisis as a matter of national priority but, according to Dr Fannir, so far nothing has been done to confront the problem. ‘There is still no needle exchange program and our doctors don’t have the right experience or the right drugs. In fact not a single one of the report’s recommendations has been implemented. I believe because of this inaction the rate of HIV infection is rising among injecting drug users, even as the number of drug users increases.’ According to Fannir the worsening crisis has severe implications for the wider community. ‘It is getting to the point that it threatens national stability. Heroin addiction is causing massive damage to poor communities. People are seeing their friends and family falling into destructive lifestyles. Drug dealing is fueling militia violence. All this is undermining faith in Libya’s politicians and the effect of this should not be underestimated.’

Addiction ‘not a priority’

Despite the concerns of those working on the ground senior health officials are unphased. Dr Mustafa Gebreil is an independent member of Libya’s congress and works in the Health Ministry. He rejects the idea that battling addiction should be an immediate focus for the government.
‘The Health Ministry is concentrating on crisis fighting. There are many issues that need attention in Libya, and because of this treating drug addicts is not a priority.’ The social stigma that surrounds HIV and drug taking is a big part of the problem according to Dr Alessandra Martino, an HIV specialist who has worked in Libya since 2005. ‘HIV is very closely associated with vices like casual sex, homosexuality and drug taking: things that are unacceptable in mainstream Libyan culture. This means for Libyans HIV and drug abuse are not a very fashionable area to be campaigning about or working in.’ Dr Martino says the shame that surrounds HIV leads some suffers to do terrible things to hide their illness. ‘Recently I had to treat a two month old child with HIV. The child’s mother had been infected by her husband who was addicted to heroin and knew he was HIV positive. He concealed his illness from his wife when they got married and forced her to give birth in Tunisia to avoid the HIV test that is compulsory at Libyan maternity hospitals. If doctors had known that the mother was HIV positive the child could have been born without the disease but now its future looks very bleak’.

To get married in Libya you are required to present a certificate that shows you are free of HIV, but according to Dr Martino these are readily available on the black market and before the revolution cost just 100 dinars ($80).
Once infected HIV sufferers find it difficult to receive treatment. Many hospitals are terrified of HIV contamination and will refuse treatment to those suspected of being injecting drug users. And even when they do receive treatment it can be ineffective. Problems with drug procurement means sometimes patients can’t get hold of the medicine they need. This allows the disease to mutate, and according to Dr Martino, because of this most patients being treated for HIV in Libya have become at least partially resistant to the treatment they are receiving.

Revolution and rehabilitation

Accounts from drug users back up the reports by doctors that Libya’s drug problems are worsening. Salah is a recovering heroin addict at Benghazi’s Nafsia hospital and says heroin became increasingly easy to get hold of after the uprising.
‘It was everywhere after the revolution. I originally gave up heroin in 2008 but I started to take it again after the liberation. I fought on the front lines and like other fighters I received a significant payout after the revolution. A lot of my friends started to take it, and because I had the extra money it was difficult to stay away.’

According to Dr Alessandra Martino the influx of the drug makes sense. ‘If I was a heroin importer this is exactly the place that I’d come to. Libya has a young population and there’s nothing for young people to do. There are few jobs, few sports facilities or cinemas, officially there’s no sex before marriage and there is no alcohol. Soon they’re going to have lots of money because the oil money will be distributed. And law enforcement is weak. It’s the perfect market.’

Addiction education

The lack of knowledge about drugs in Libyan society is also a cause for concern according to Dr Fannir. ‘During the Gaddafi era the general public knew very little about the dangers of drugs, and the situation isn’t improving. The chaos of revolution meant outreach and education programs collapsed and many still haven’t returned.’
Speaking about their experiences many of the patients at the drug treatment centre lament the lack of education about drugs in Libya. ‘Back in the 90s we didn’t know what we were letting ourselves in for,’ says Esam, a HIV positive veteran of Tripoli’s heroin scene. ‘There was a place in the old quarter where you could put your arm through a hole in a wall with some cash in the palm of your hand. Someone would take your money and you’d receive an injection, but you wouldn’t see anything. People aren’t so naive now, but most still don’t fully understand the consequences of their actions.’

Free treatment for some

As we leave the Nafsia clinic the patients prepare for lunch. A hospital worker hands around containers with chicken stew and rice in the communal garden. The scene is relaxed and there’s a sense of optimism amongst the patients.
Drug users from all over the country are referred to the Al Nafsia clinic by doctors. They come from all walks of life and treatment is free but, with facilities for just a handful of inpatients and a couple of hundred outpatients the vast majority have to battle their addictions without proper support. ‘This place is good for Libya but you’ve got to remember its patients are the lucky few’ says one of the hospital’s psychologists as he shows us out. ‘We help all we can but for the rest free Libya is a very difficult place.’

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Syrian doctor in a Field Hospital - S...
Raqqah, Syria
By abo.hashem
26 Mar 2013

A syrian doctor watching an x-ray of injured feet filled with fragments of a shell in Raqqa city northern Syria

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Burn (8 of 15)
Samalout, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
23 Mar 2013

The clinic runs on a modest budget of 2,400 Egyptian pounds per month. However, it is very difficult for the clinic to stock adequate supplies like medications and gloves. Much of the medicine in the clinic comes from donations from people visiting from abroad.

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Burn (9 of 15)
Samalout, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
23 Mar 2013

The most vulnerable group to burns are children. Some are burned by parents for misbehaving, whereas others are injured as a result of the cooking area being the same as the sleeping area.

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Health in Uganda (20 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a one month baby girl with evident signs of malnutrition.

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Health in Uganda (21 ...
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows a one month baby girls with evident signs of malnutrition.

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Health in Uganda (10 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda-March 10, 2013-
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a woman affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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Health in Uganda (11 ...
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda-March 10, 2013-
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a woman affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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Health in Uganda (12 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda-March 10, 2013-
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a man affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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Health in Uganda (13 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero-Uganda-March 10th,2013-
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a man affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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Health in Uganda (14 ...
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a man affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.