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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Snow is falling at the entrance of the infamous Red Forest in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.
. Red Forest gained its name from the colour of the trees after they died following the absorption of high levels of radiation.
. After the nuclear disaster, parts of the Red Forest were bulldozed and buried by liquidators in waste gravevards. The sign in the image is reffering to such a "temporarily" graveyard.
. The site remains one of the most contaminated areas in the world today.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Soviet propaganda grafitti on the wall of a house in Chernobyl-2. DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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2021_Chernobyl-5123
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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2021_Chernobyl-5095
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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2021_Chernobyl-5069
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Inside the DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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2021_Chernobyl-5111
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Abandonend and broken parts of the DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Abandonend and broken parts of the DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Inside of DUGA radar station in the secret town of Chernobyl-2. It is one of the six components of Duga ("Arc") over-the-horizon radar complex. Designed in 1970s to detect launches of U.S. ICBMs to Soviet Union. It is a complex of more than 30 structures, the center of which is a breath taking antenna array; 148 x 500 m and 98 x 250 m. Major landmarks here are the communication center building and apartment complex, that was a home for approximately 1000 people.
As the Chernobyl disaster caused a contamination of Chernobyl-2, and then followed by the end of the Cold War seeing the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Duga project ended badly. It was cancelled and all the components were destroyed, except an array at Chernobyl-2.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Hanna Zavorótnja inside her house in Kupuváte inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Like nearly 200,000 other people, Hanna was forced to leave her home after the nuclear disaster following the explosion of reactor number four at the Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl on April 2th, 1986. In 1988 some hundred elderly peope decided to go back to their home towns. First discouraged by officials they were later granted to live inside the exclusion zone. In 2004 Hanna's husband died. Two weeks prior to this visit her sister, who also lived with her, also died. Now Hanna spends her final days alone in the abandoned village of Kupuváte.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Hanna Zavorótnja inside her house in Kupuváte inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Like nearly 200,000 other people, Hanna was forced to leave her home after the nuclear disaster following the explosion of reactor number four at the Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl on April 2th, 1986. In 1988 some hundred elderly peope decided to go back to their home towns. First discouraged by officials they were later granted to live inside the exclusion zone. In 2004 Hanna's husband died. Two weeks prior to this visit her sister, who also lived with her, also died. Now Hanna spends her final days alone in the abandoned village of Kupuváte.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Hanna Zavorótnja inside her house in Kupuváte inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Like nearly 200,000 other people, Hanna was forced to leave her home after the nuclear disaster following the explosion of reactor number four at the Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl on April 2th, 1986. In 1988 some hundred elderly peope decided to go back to their home towns. First discouraged by officials they were later granted to live inside the exclusion zone. In 2004 Hanna's husband died. Two weeks prior to this visit her sister, who also lived with her, also died. Now Hanna spends her final days alone in the abandoned village of Kupuváte.

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2021_Chernobyl-4888
Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Hanna Zavorótnja inside her house in Kupuváte inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Like nearly 200,000 other people, Hanna was forced to leave her home after the nuclear disaster following the explosion of reactor number four at the Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl on April 2th, 1986. In 1988 some hundred elderly peope decided to go back to their home towns. First discouraged by officials they were later granted to live inside the exclusion zone. In 2004 Hanna's husband died. Two weeks prior to this visit her sister, who also lived with her, also died. Now Hanna spends her final days alone in the abandoned village of Kupuváte.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Hanna Zavorótnja inside her house in Kupuváte inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Like nearly 200,000 other people, Hanna was forced to leave her home after the nuclear disaster following the explosion of reactor number four at the Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl on April 2th, 1986. In 1988 some hundred elderly peope decided to go back to their home towns. First discouraged by officials they were later granted to live inside the exclusion zone. In 2004 Hanna's husband died. Two weeks prior to this visit her sister, who also lived with her, also died. Now Hanna spends her final days alone in the abandoned village of Kupuváte.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Hanna Zavorótnja inside her house in Kupuváte inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Like nearly 200,000 other people, Hanna was forced to leave her home after the nuclear disaster following the explosion of reactor number four at the Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl on April 2th, 1986. In 1988 some hundred elderly peope decided to go back to their home towns. First discouraged by officials they were later granted to live inside the exclusion zone. In 2004 Hanna's husband died. Two weeks prior to this visit her sister, who also lived with her, also died. Now Hanna spends her final days alone in the abandoned village of Kupuváte.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Hanna Zavorótnja inside her house in Kupuváte inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Like nearly 200,000 other people, Hanna was forced to leave her home after the nuclear disaster following the explosion of reactor number four at the Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl on April 2th, 1986. In 1988 some hundred elderly peope decided to go back to their home towns. First discouraged by officials they were later granted to live inside the exclusion zone. In 2004 Hanna's husband died. Two weeks prior to this visit her sister, who also lived with her, also died. Now Hanna spends her final days alone in the abandoned village of Kupuváte.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Hanna Zavorótnja inside her house in Kupuváte inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Like nearly 200,000 other people, Hanna was forced to leave her home after the nuclear disaster following the explosion of reactor number four at the Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl on April 2th, 1986. In 1988 some hundred elderly peope decided to go back to their home towns. First discouraged by officials they were later granted to live inside the exclusion zone. In 2004 Hanna's husband died. Two weeks prior to this visit her sister, who also lived with her, also died. Now Hanna spends her final days alone in the abandoned village of Kupuváte.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Hanna Zavorótnja inside her house in Kupuváte inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Like nearly 200,000 other people, Hanna was forced to leave her home after the nuclear disaster following the explosion of reactor number four at the Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl on April 2th, 1986. In 1988 some hundred elderly peope decided to go back to their home towns. First discouraged by officials they were later granted to live inside the exclusion zone. In 2004 Hanna's husband died. Two weeks prior to this visit her sister, who also lived with her, also died. Now Hanna spends her final days alone in the abandoned village of Kupuváte.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Hanna Zavorótnja inside her house in Kupuváte inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Like nearly 200,000 other people, Hanna was forced to leave her home after the nuclear disaster following the explosion of reactor number four at the Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl on April 2th, 1986. In 1988 some hundred elderly peope decided to go back to their home towns. First discouraged by officials they were later granted to live inside the exclusion zone. In 2004 Hanna's husband died. Two weeks prior to this visit her sister, who also lived with her, also died. Now Hanna spends her final days alone in the abandoned village of Kupuváte.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Radioactive contaminated robotic machines and vehicles are on display in the town of Chernobyl. These machines were used by liquidators to collect the nuclear waste in the aftermath of explosion of reactor 4. All machines are highly contaminated.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The only bar in the town of Chernobyl where workers can buy food, drinks and coffee. The selling of alcohol before 7pm is prohipited.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

An abandoned house is reclaimed by nature in the nearly abandoned village of Kupuváte inside the Chernobyl Exclusion zone.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Oleksandr Rybak, who has worked inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone for more than 12 years now, is a showing an image of workers on the construction site of the sarcophagous in 1986 after the Chernobyl reactor explosion. Behind him the new safe confinement is seen. The construction had been completed and opened in July 2019. Construction costs were about 1.5 billion Euro. The new safe confinment is able to work for 100 years before it need to be replaced. Also the monument to the casaulties is seen in front of the new safe confinement.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Oleksandr Rybak, who has worked inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone for more than 12 years now, is a showing an image of workers on the construction site of the sarcophagous in 1986 after the Chernobyl reactor explosion. Behind him the new safe confinement is seen. The construction had been completed and opened in July 2019. Construction costs were about 1.5 billion Euro. The new safe confinment is able to work for 100 years before it need to be replaced. Also the monument to the casaulties is seen in front of the new safe confinement.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The new safe confinement is seen in the background, covering the damaged sarcophagous of reactor 4. The construction had been completed and opened in July 2019. Construction costs were about 1.5 billion Euro. The new safe confinment is able to work for 100 years before it need to be replaced. Also the monument to the casaulties is seen in front of the new safe confinement.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Oleksandr Rybak, who has worked inside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone for more than 12 years now, is a showing an image of workers on the construction site of the sarcophagous in 1986 after the Chernobyl reactor explosion. Behind him the new safe confinement is seen. The construction had been completed and opened in July 2019. Construction costs were about 1.5 billion Euro. The new safe confinment is able to work for 100 years before it need to be replaced. Also the monument to the casaulties is seen in front of the new safe confinement.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Visitors are standing on the fuel channels above the core of Reactor Number 3 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. The radioactive wreckage of exploded Reactor Number 4 is hiding behind a massive concrete wall only less than 70 meters away. On April 26th, 1986, a worker noticed that the channels went up and down. Seconds later the core of Reactor Number 4 exploded causing the world's greatest atomic disaster with tons of nuclear fuel escaping into the atmosphere.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

The water pumps of reactor 3 at the Nuclear Power Plant Chernobyl.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

A technician is standing on the fuel channels above the core of Reactor Number 3 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. The radioactive wreckage of exploded Reactor Number 4 is hiding behind a massive concrete wall only less than 70 meters away. On April 26th, 1986, a worker noticed that the channels went up and down. Seconds later the core of Reactor Number 4 exploded causing the world's greatest atomic disaster with tons of nuclear fuel escaping into the atmosphere.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Visitors in front of the Memorial for Valery Khodemchuk, the first victim of the explosion of reactor 4 at the Nuclear Power Plant Chernobyl. Khodemchuk had the night shift as a circulating pump operator and was killed by the explosion. His body was never found and it is presumed that he is entombed under the remains of the circulation pumps.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Visitors in front of the Memorial for Valery Khodemchuk, the first victim of the explosion of reactor 4 at the Nuclear Power Plant Chernobyl. Khodemchuk had the night shift as a circulating pump operator and was killed by the explosion. His body was never found and it is presumed that he is entombed under the remains of the circulation pumps.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Inside the infamous Control Room Number 4. This is the exact place where in the early morning hours of April 26th, 1986, a number of wrong decisions lead to the greatest nuclear catastrophe of mankind. The control room shines purple, a result of the constant decontamination measures.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Inside the infamous Control Room Number 4. This is the exact place where in the early morning hours of April 26th, 1986, a number of wrong decisions lead to the greatest nuclear catastrophe of mankind. The control room shines purple, a result of the constant decontamination measures.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Inside the infamous Control Room Number 4. This is the exact place where in the early morning hours of April 26th, 1986, a number of wrong decisions lead to the greatest nuclear catastrophe of mankind. The control room shines purple, a result of the constant decontamination measures.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Inside the infamous Control Room Number 4. This is the exact place where in the early morning hours of April 26th, 1986, a number of wrong decisions lead to the greatest nuclear catastrophe of mankind. The control room shines purple, a result of the constant decontamination measures.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Inside the infamous Control Room Number 4. This is the exact place where in the early morning hours of April 26th, 1986, a number of wrong decisions lead to the greatest nuclear catastrophe of mankind. The control room shines purple, a result of the constant decontamination measures.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Inside the infamous Control Room Number 4. This is the exact place where in the early morning hours of April 26th, 1986, a number of wrong decisions lead to the greatest nuclear catastrophe of mankind. The control room shines purple, a result of the constant decontamination measures.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Devices from Reactor Number Three Inside control room number three. The room is an identical twin of infamous control room number 4, but completley intact. Radiation levels inside control room 3 are not as high as in control room number 4. So people are able to learn more about how the control room and the reactor number 4 worked before acutally visiting control room 4.

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Chernobyl Exclusion Zone
By Michael Biach
04 Feb 2021

Inside control room number three. The room is an identical twin of infamous control room number 4, but completley intact. Radiation levels inside control room 3 are not as high as in control room number 4. So people are able to learn more about how the control room and the reactor number 4 worked before acutally visiting control room 4. Visitors are looking at a