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Eid Ul Adha Preparation in Karachi, P...
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
08 Aug 2019

Pakistanis are preparing to celebrate Eid ul Adha on August 12. "Everyone is busy nowadays preparing for Eid ul Adha, buying a good animal to sacrifice. Eid al-Adha. Feast of the Sacrifice, also called the "Festival of the Sacrifice", is the second of two Islamic holidays celebrated worldwide each year (the other being Eid al-Fitr), and considered the holier of the two. It honours the willingness of Ibrahim (Abraham) to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God's command.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Transporter delivering services at its peak during the month of Eid ul Adha as Muslims purchasing sacrificial animals from the Animal Stock Market from the Outskirts of Metropolitan City, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Transporter delivering services at its peak during the month of Eid ul Adha as Muslims purchasing sacrificial animals from the Animal Stock Market from the Outskirts of Metropolitan City, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Boy sitting near sacrificial cow as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor cutting grass for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Children playing with their Sacrificial goat as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Young girl showing her affection with sacrificial goat as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder grabbing sack of grass for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor selling foddering goods and displaying jewelry for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor cutting grass for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor Weighting grass for customers as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Customer purchasing Fodder for his sacrificial cow at makeshift Stall where vendor selling foddering goods and displaying jewelry for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Turkey's Camel Wrestling Championship
Selcuk
By Michael Biach
17 Jan 2015

January 16-18, 2015

Selcuk, Turkey

In January each year there is the annual Camel Wrestling Championship held in Selcuk in Turkey. The event puts together two bull (male) camels with a female camel on heat nearby. The camels fight it out for the female, leaning on each other to push the other one down. It is most common in the Aegean region of Turkey, but is also found in the Marmara and Mediterranean regions of that country. There are an estimated 1200 camel wrestlers (or Tulu) in Turkey, bred specially for the competitions.

A camel can win a wrestling match in three ways: By making the other camel retreat, scream, or fall. The owner of a camel may also throw a rope into the field to declare a forfeit if he is concerned for the safety of his animal.

Camels wrestle with others in their same weight class. Camels have different tricks, and contest organizers match camels with different skills. Some camels wrestle from the right and some from the left; some trip the other with foot tricks ("çengelci"), and some trap their opponent's head under their chest and then try to sit ("bağcı"); some push their rivals to make them retreat ("tekçi").

A camel wrestling event involves considerable pomp and ceremony. The camels are decorated, and participate in a march through town followed by musicians on the day before the event. The actual wrestling can be somewhat underwhelming to someone not familiar with the intricacies, although onlookers must often flee from an oncoming camel that is retreating in defeat from his opponent.

In the heat of the tournament, camels spew foamy saliva in their excitement. Additionally, camels are retromingent animals, and so spectators would be advised to beware not only of flying saliva but of flying urine as well.

Popularity of the sport is declining, as the relative costs of caring for such an animal rises, as well as concern for the animals' welfare.

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Salt Workers of the Danakil Depressio...
Babille, Ethiopia
By Christina Feldt
01 May 2013

Afar lady passing by the salt caravans in the stone desert of the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia.

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Salt Workers of the Danakil Depressio...
Babille, Ethiopia
By Christina Feldt
01 May 2013

Salt worker unloading salt blocks in Berahile, Danakil Depression, Ethiopia.

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Salt Workers of the Danakil Depressio...
Berahile, Ethiopia
By Christina Feldt
01 May 2013

Salt worker unloading salt blocks in Berahile, Danakil Depression, Ethiopia.

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The Salt Workers of the Danakil Depre...
Berahile, Ethiopia
By Christina Feldt
30 Apr 2013

The Danakil Depression -- specifically the area surrounding Lake Afdera is the place where the majority of the salt production in Ethiopia is found. The lake yields more than 1.3 million tons of salt annually and around 750 officially registered salt miners work in this area. Teams of Muslim Afar and Christian Tigrayans from the Ethiopian Highlands gather daily to mine the salt and transport it by camelsand donkyes to a small town called Berahile. In the past, the salt blocks -- called amolé were used all over Ethiopia as money. Although cash has replaced the salt, the trade itself remains the main livelihood of the Ethiopian Afar. They guard and manage the “white gold” as their greatest treasure.

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Salt Workers of the Danakil Depressio...
Berahile, Ethiopia
By Christina Feldt
30 Apr 2013

A salt caravan on its way to Berahile. This walk takes up to 3 days and temperatures hardly drop below 50º.

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Salt Workers of the Danakil Depressio...
Babille, Ethiopia
By Christina Feldt
30 Apr 2013

Salt worker loading salt blocks on his camel, getting ready for the 3-day walk to the town of Berahile.

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Salt Workers of the Danakil depressio...
Babille, Ethiopia
By Christina Feldt
30 Apr 2013

Tiles of salt getting stacked, tied and prepared for transport.

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Salt Workers of the Danakil Depressio...
Babille, Ethiopia
By Christina Feldt
30 Apr 2013

Salt worker transporting salt blocks with his camels and donkeys in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia.

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Salt Workers of the Danakil Depressio...
Babille, Ethiopia
By Christina Feldt
30 Apr 2013

Tiles of salt getting stacked, tied and prepared for transport.

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A Fight for a Voice (12 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Ubax is taking photos of camels for her report on farm animal healthcare.

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Olive Wood Carving for tourism in Pal...
bayt Jala, Palestine
By Firas S Mukarker
13 Feb 2013

A very ancient handcraft in Bethlehem, Palestine, was inherited thousands of years ago by the time of Romans in the Holy Land , until today, you can find all this work in souvenir shops in Bethlehem, mostly camels and religious statues for Christians Jews and Muslims .

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (6 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
03 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Mustafa Can is a camel handler and works at a camel stable in Burhaniye, a town in the Aegean region of Turkey, where camel wrestling is a popular age old tradition.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (7 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--A man shows his granddaughter one of the camels participating in the Pelitkoy camel wrestling tournament. About a hundred camels compete each weekend, though no winner is declared.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (8 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--A camel is prepared for wrestling by having it's muzzle removed and a rope tied around it's mouth. The rope is used to control the camel and separate it from it's opponent before either creature is injured.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (9 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--A camel pins it's opponent during a wrestling tournament held in a village in the Aegean region of Turkey. No champions are declared, and most often the bouts end in a tie. Owners say winning is not important.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (10 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Spectators grill meat, drink raki and dance to music performed by Roma (Gypsy) musicians during a camel wrestling tournament held in a village in the Aegean region of Turkey.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (11 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Participants relax during an unseasonably warm February day at a camel wrestling tournament in the town of Pelitkoy in the Aegean region of Turkey.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (12 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Mustafa Can unloads a camel from a truck after it competed in a camel wrestling tournament.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (13 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camel owner Mustafa Akgun tries to coax a reluctant
camel into a truck in order to be transported to a competition in nearby town of Pelitkoy in the Aegean region of Turkey, where camel wrestling is popular.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (2 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camels are decorated with handmade decorations made of felt, beads and shells.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (3 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camel owner Ahmet Sorsilmaz from Bodrum, Turkey, kisses his camel on the morning before a wrestling tournament.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (4 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--A man leads his camel around the arena at Pelitkoy Camel Wrestling tournament before a match.

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Camel Wrestling in Turkey (5 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
02 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Elaborate handmade decorations are used to decorate camels that compete in wrestling matches, a popular sport in Western Turkey.

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Salt Workers of The Danakil Depressio...
Berahile, Ethiopia.
By Christina Feldt
02 May 2012

Salt worker arriving in the town of Berahile after a long walk through the stone desert of the Danakil Depression.

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Salt Workers of The Danakil Depressio...
Berahile, Ethiopia
By Transterra Editor
02 May 2012

The Danakil depression -- specifically the area surrounding Lake Afdera is the place where the majority of the salt production in Ethiopia is found. The lake yields more than 1.3 million tons of salt annually and around 750 officially registered salt miners work in this area. Teams of Muslim Afar and Christian Tigrayans from the Ethiopian Highlands gather daily to mine the salt and transport it by camelsand donkyes to a small town called Berahile. In the past, the salt blocks -- called amolé -- were used all over Ethiopia as money. Although cash has replaced the salt, the trade itself remains the main livelihood of the Ethiopian Afar. They guard and manage the “white gold” as their greatest treasure.

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Salt Workers of The Danakil Depressio...
Berahile, Ethiopia
By Christina Feldt
01 May 2012

Afar lady passing by the salt caravans in the stone desert of the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia.