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Zaatari Sleeps
Mafraq, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
01 Apr 2013

Samir's family gets settled in for another night in the Zaatari Refugee camp after dinner. The family is on their 5th month inside the camp and since then three of Samir's children have been married and more of their family has arrived from war torn Syria. The gas heaters are prized inside the camp but have also become hazardous and have burnt down rows of tents at night claiming young lives and destroying valuable possessions.

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Syrians Struggle in Jordan
Za'atari Camp and Mafraq, Jordan
By Amy Hybels
25 Mar 2013

During US President Barack Obama's visit to Jordan, King Abdullah II vowed to keep the Kingdom's borders open after announcing that more than 460,000 Syrian refugees have fled to Jordan since the conflict began. The influx is projected to cost the Kingdom $550 million dollars a year, however the number of refugees are expected to double by the end of the year.
Video journalist Amy Hybels traveled to Mafraq and the Za'atari refugee camp to see how the Syrian refugees living both inside and outside of the largest camp are coping.

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Construction Of Makeshift Shelter
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

On arrival at the camps, refugees construct makeshift wooden framed shelters.

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The syrian nakba 41
Atmeh
By adrian
01 Jan 2013

Young children watch a football game between clothes drying on a fence in Islahiye refugee camp for Syrians in southern Turkey.

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The syrian nakba 42
Atmeh
By adrian
01 Jan 2013

A tent in the Islahiye refugee camp for Syrians, in Turkey, home to almost four thousand people fleeing the violence.

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Al Zaatari Refugee Camp
Mafraq, Jordan
By Mais Istanbuli
29 Dec 2012

Syrian Families at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan

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Displaced Syrians Brace For Winter's ...
Idlib, Syria
By U.S. Editor
14 Dec 2012

Displaced Syrians brace for winter’s onslaught.

There are nearly two million internally displaced people who are stuck inside Syria with no place to go. Cold and afraid, most say they want desperately want to cross into Turkey. But Turkey has refused to accept them citing overcrowding. Qah camp is inside Syria close to the Turkish border. It was founded three months ago and is now has 520 tents. More families arrive every day, many from Hass—a town 85 kilometers southwest of Aleppo. The population, mainly women, children and the elderly, has swelled to 3600 since it was established three months ago.

About 450,000 Syrians live in camps in neighboring countries including over 137,000 in Turkey. But for an estimated two million internally displaced people remain in Syria, in danger and living in very difficult conditions.

Two new refugee camps are being constructed in Turkey, ostensibly to accommodate those stuck at the border. But for the people whose homes have been destroyed, family members killed, villages abandoned, it’s a race against time, weather and war.

Just two weeks ago regime forces dropped bombs nearby, creating a panic as people ran desperately for the Turkish border. No deaths were reported, but the situation remains tense. “Six missiles hit this village and [nearby] Atmeh,” reported Hassan, 35, a former police officer who has joined the FSA and lives with his family in the camp.

Since winter began more than a month ago, the region has experienced many days of torrential rains. Water leaks into the tents, wetting blankets, mattresses and rugs. At night, temperatures sometimes drop below freezing. “From inside the tents, you can hear the children crying,” says Mustafa, a 22 year-old former chef and military sergeant who fled with nine members of his family.

A doctor working with Medicins du Monde who preferred not to be identified said that he has seen many cases of respiratory problems and say that about 30% of the camp’s residents suffer from diarrhea as a result of unclean drinking water. Hepatitis A is also spreading rapidly at the camp. And it’s only December—the toughest winter months are still ahead.

-Jodi Hilton

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Azaz Camp, Syria (5 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (9 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (15 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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Azaz Camp, Syria (25 of 41)
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border.
Refugees from Halep and surrounding areas have lost their houses under the bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at the time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings. The refugees believed the could cross the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees were accepted by the Turkish government who settled in the nearby camp of Kilis, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive.

Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. The refugees must stay were they are, with no home in Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, as if convicted to stay in the camp.
The excess number refugees not accepted into Turkey settled in September 2012 under big hangars once used by Syrian customs police for storing and checking goods before letting them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavement, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.

Tents arrived just at around the middle of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were placed on open ground. In December 2012, the number of refugees at the Azaz camp reached about 7000.

Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide meals every day. Supplies come from world wide relief organizations and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to meet the needs of so many. Tents are not waterproof. The pavement is constantly wet when the rain falls, especially hard for those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Water is scarce and is brought in big containers for those who need it most. Heating becomes a real issue with the oncoming winter. Kids are sent to the surrounding fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot go too far since the mine fields protecting the no-man’s land are right at border line next to the camp. Refugees burn dry grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light to even walk. They rest by candlelight in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest calling for better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) to get attention from the Turkish Governor of the area, with no results. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place to return to. Convicted, forgotten. No one knows for how long.

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The syrian nakba 38
Atmeh
By adrian
01 Dec 2012

The silhouette of a Syrian woman outside a medical tent in Atmeh camp for IDP Syrians. Around 12,000 IDP's now live in the camp. The seemingly endless Syrian war means that these people will likely stay in these camps for the foreseeable future.

December 2nd 2012, Atmeh, Syria.

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The syrian nakba 39
Atmeh
By adrian
01 Dec 2012

Atmeh refugee camp, for internally displaced Syrians. Around 12,000 IDP live in the camp. Atmeh, Syria.

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The syrian nakba 40
Atmeh
By adrian
01 Dec 2012

02/12/2012 Atmeh refugee camp, for internally displaced Syrians. Around 12,000 IDP live in the camp. Atmeh, Syria.

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Playing with fire
Bayt Jala, Palestine
By Firas S Mukarker
21 Nov 2012

location: scout camp, Beit Jala palestine , playing with the fire 2012

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Sunrises over Zaatari
Mafraq, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
31 Oct 2012

Sunrise in Zaatari Refugee Camp in Mafraq, Jordan. The United Nations High Commission for Refugees now estimates that over 47,000 displaced Syrians live in Zaatari refugee camp. This camp population is included in the total 275,000 estimated to be living in Jordan by the government. But despite the hardships of a desert camp in winter, daily life continues. Marriages, births, children playing and people calling home to check on loved ones still in Syria - this is Zaatari. Oct. 31, 2012.

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Family in Wait
Mafraq, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
31 Oct 2012

Samir and his two daughters both are engaged to marry men the refuged from their hometown of Darraa, Syria that live inside the Zaatari Refugee camp, Mafraq, Jordan Oct 30, 2012.

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Income for the Family
Mafraq, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
31 Oct 2012

Abu Hamed and his brother have organized a series of small shops where refugees can purchase vegetables, water, candy, and even cigarettes. The currency used is everything from Syrian to Jordanian even Saudi. Zataari Refugee Camp Mafraq Syria, Oct 31, 2012

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Samir Waiting for Syria
Mafraq, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
27 Oct 2012

Samir, remains hopeful for a proper surgery to be able to walk without pain again and to leave the Zaatari camp that now holds over 100,000 Syrian refugees, but he is thankful for his Jordanian brothers.

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Waiting for Surgery
Mafraq, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
27 Oct 2012

Samir, father of eight, spent seven years in the Syrian Army only to be shot in the front of his home in-front of his family for asking Syrian soldiers why they were questioning him. He is now living with the bullet lodged inches away from his spine making the left side of his body inactive. He remains hopeful to leave soon and thankful for his Jordanian brothers. Oct. 26, 2012.

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Syrian Refugees In Baalbek
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This Syrian woman has been in Lebanon for six months. She came from Homs.
The reason for her to leave was a very heavy shelling on their house, and abductions of people. She came with her whole family, which consists of five people.
They crossed the border in a legal way taking a taxi until Baalbek. It was at the time when crossing the border was still easy.
The life in Lebanon has been fine till now. They registered with" UNHCR" when they arrived. Now she is registering her children in school at the "Save the Children registration center."

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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SYRIAN REFUGEES IN LEBANON - Beirut E...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Beirut Editor's Picks
18 Sep 2012

This photo collection shows a few Syrian families who are waiting to register their children with the UNHCR and the organization, Save the Children, so they can attend school in Lebanon after crossing over from Syria.
The latest report from the UNHCR states that over 67,960 Syrian refugees are in Lebanon, with 49,653 registered and over 18,307 in contact with UNHCR. While most children will be able to attend school in Lebanon, there have been many issues with refugees being denied because they lack proper paperwork. Another issue that is increasingly become more of a problem is that of child trauma, as reports say almost every child has seen someone killed and there are no resources available to provide counseling for the children, many of which are suffering from PTSD.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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EL RANCHO
Ghadras, Lebanon
By Mais Istanbuli
26 Aug 2012

As the crowds gather in Thrill Town under the hot summer sun, Johnny Hotshot, the head performer begins his show. “I need a volunteer” he calls out in his American accent to the scared and skeptical audience. After commandeering a child he preforms rope tricks, lassoing misbehaving children to the delight of their camera-snapping parents.

It could be a scene from any western dude ranch, though this ranch is in the heart Lebanon.

El Rancho, a theme park and fully working ranch sits in the Ghodras hills of Northern Lebanon, less than 40 minutes away from bustling Beirut. On an average Sunday Christian and Muslim Lebanese families, as well as visitors from Iraq, Iran and the Gulf come to visit the only ranch in the Middle East.

Cowboy culture is not native to Lebanon or the Middle East but became popular as a novelty after exposure on television and though movies. Many guests have never been to a ranch, or ridden a horse which is apparent after a series of families peek at the horses and then retire to brunch.

“Are you a real cowboy?” A little girl asks Johnny Hotshot, the head performer at El Rancho. Looking the part he wears cowboy boots, spurs, and a collection of guns around his waist. “OF COURSE” he shouts and fires a shot in the air with his cap gun. Johnny and a cast of several other American’s are flown out to the ranch on monthly contracts to give El Rancho an authentic feel and to amuse its well-heeled guests.

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El Rancho (21 of 21)
Ghadras, Lebanon
By Monique Jaques
26 Aug 2012

Johnny Hotshot, and American cowboy and entertainer at El Rancho preforms in the afternoon show where he shoots baloons and does rope tricks.

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El Rancho (2 of 21)
Ghadras, Lebanon
By Monique Jaques
26 Aug 2012

An Egyptian handler persuades a bull back into the pen after a bull riding session.

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El Rancho (4 of 21)
Ghadras, Lebanon
By Monique Jaques
26 Aug 2012

Bull riding is a popular spectators sport at El Rancho.

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El Rancho (5 of 21)
Ghadras, Lebanon
By Monique Jaques
26 Aug 2012

Johnny Hotshot, and American cowboy and entertainer at El Rancho.

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El Rancho (6 of 21)
Ghadras, Lebanon
By Monique Jaques
26 Aug 2012

A Lebaneese couple shoot guns and bows at a target at El Rancho, a dude ranch in Northern Lebanon.

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El Rancho (7 of 21)
Ghadras, Lebanon
By Monique Jaques
26 Aug 2012

Hamis, a Syrian cowboy speaks with Brock and American ranch hand brought out to work at El Rancho.

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El Rancho (8 of 21)
Ghadras, Lebanon
By Monique Jaques
26 Aug 2012

Hamis, a Syrian cowboy shows off his belt buckle won in last years rodeo. Hamis came to work at El Rancho after the Syrian Revolution started.

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El Rancho (9 of 21)
Ghadras, Lebanon
By Monique Jaques
26 Aug 2012

Johnny Hotshot, and American cowboy and entertainer at El Rancho preforms at the evening dinner show.

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El Rancho (10 of 21)
Ghadras, Lebanon
By Monique Jaques
26 Aug 2012

Johnny Hotshot, and American cowboy and entertainer at El Rancho preforms at the evening dinner show.

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El Rancho (11 of 21)
Ghadras, Lebanon
By Monique Jaques
26 Aug 2012

An Iraqui family climb ropes across a valley at El Rancho. Because of Lebanon's easy visa restrictions to Arab countries the ranch receives many visitors from the Middle East.