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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

The camp was built to host 10,000 people but is now home to more than 12,000. They mainly come from the area of Qamlishi in Syria and have fled the fighting between regime troops and the rebels.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

A refugee holding the currency exchange shop. He also sells sim cards. Refugees work inside or outside the camp to earn some money. Their income allows them to buy items they don't get with the humanitarian aid. Working outside the camp is also a way for them to be partly integrated in the economic life of the region.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

These two teenagers manage a clothing store, instead of going to school, to make money and help their families.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

Children make up half of the population of the camp. School is not mandatory and many of them don't attend. They wander in the alleys, playing in dust ditches and flying small kites.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

Children go to school until 3 pm. Teachers are all refugees living in the camp. After class, they play in the camp or learn traditional Kurdish dance.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

Children go to school until 3 pm. Teachers are all refugees living in the camp. After class, they play in the camp or learn traditional Kurdish dance.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

Many shops, like this "supermarket", have popped up inside the camp. They allow refugees to earn some money, find items they don't get through humanitarian aid, and help recreate the atmosphere of a city with barber shops, clothing stores, photo and video studios, etc.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

Many refugees are college graduates and used to work in the oil industry in Syria. But in Iraqi kurdistan, the authorities allow them to work only in low-paying manual jobs, showing the limits of the "Kurdish fraternity".

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

Refugees receive humanitarian aid every month. The boxes contain food and hygienic products. Many refugees complain about the lack of medicines. They usually buy the rest of the items they need thanks to the money they earn by working outside or inside the camp.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

Mnedy, 36, is the chief of the G block. The camp is divided in blocks, from A to R, with around 100 tents per block. 530 people live in the G block. The chief must report all the problems of his block and has to make sure supplies are equally distributed among inhabitants. Mnedy said there are not many big problems in the camp, except for the lack of medicines and the fact that he is not paid for the work he does has a chief.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

Aven (7), Wael (4), Muamed (2 months, born in the tent) have been living in this tent with their parents since August 2013, after several months of waiting at the border. They come from Al-Malikiyah, also known as Derik in Kurdish. The other refugees are mostly from Al-Maabadah. They don't attend school, as it not mandatory in the camp.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

Tents are about 10 square meters. Each family is given one, which can accommodate up to seven people.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

The camp is located one hour from Erbil, the capital of the Iraqi Kurdistan region. It was opened in August 2013, after the reopening of the borders with Syria. Around 12,00 refugees, mostly Syrian Kurdish, are packed in 1800 tents. Men who work outside the camp are only allowed to do low-paid manual jobs, while many of them hold a university diploma.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

Children can't leave the camp, and there is no class for those under seven years-old. School is not mandatory and many of them don't attend. They wander in alleys, playing in the dust ditches and flying small kites.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

A repairman in the camp. His job is to repair anything that has been broken, using any materials and tools he can find.

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Kawrgosk refugee camp
By Victor Point
14 Apr 2014

About 516 tents built on concrete foundations are about to be finished in the camp.

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Bakery In the Opposition Controlled A...
Deir Al-Zor, Syria
By TTM Contributor 9
09 Apr 2014

The difficulty of daily life for the people in the opposition-controlled area of Deir al-Zor can be seen through the bakeries, where the prices of bread have skyrocketed, increasing to 500 Liras (before the war in Syria bread cost around 10 Liras) for a pack with only eight pieces of bread. This is due to the fact that the majority of bakeries in the city have stopped working, either due to being bombed or because of the lack of flour and fuel in the besieged city.

As a way to change this, a group of young people have invested in one of the abandoned bakeries in the city. Relying on donations from people and charity organizations, such as the Euphrates Organization affiliates to the local council one pack of bread has fallen to 25 Liras, containing 10 pieces of bread. The bakery is located in Al Jabela neighborhood, which is only meters away from the battlefront with government forces.

The people of the bakery say that there are able to feed around 500 families, both for the Al Jabela neighborhood and the surrounding neighborhoods. The first interview is with the supervisor of the bakery, Majid Al Abosh, who worked as a tailor before the revolution. The second interview is with the man in charge of working in the bakery, Mohammed Al Mohameed, a baker who had stopped working after the city was besieged, and is now back to work.

1) General Shots of the Bakery

2) Shots of children loading flour into bags

3) Shots of the workers preparing the dough

4) Shots of the dough on the rolling carpet as the workers process it

5) Shots of the pieces of dough as they roll into the oven

6) Shots of bread coming out of the oven

7) Workers grouping the bread into piles

8) Interview one :: Majid Al Abosh, Bakery Supervisor
"We produce bread daily in the liberated areas of Deir Al-Zor. We produce three days a week by collaborating with the local council and three days by collaborating with the Deir Al-Zor charity organization. We sell it at a symbolic price, just to cover the production costs. The flour we get for free from the local council, other organizations and private supporters. Ten pieces are sold for 25Liras. Friday is our day off. So families benefit from this bakery. There is an electricity problem, because of the cuts; we stopped for four days because we weren’t able to provide electricity. Finally, one of the brigades helped us provide electricity by setting diesel from the rural areas. We sell the bread for a symbolic price in order to cove the production and labor costs. The most annoying part of the job is that we can sell to one person for not more than 50 Liras, so the biggest amount of families will be able to benefit from this. There are families that bread for 50 liras is not sufficient for but there's nothing we can do. There is a project to open three more bakeries, I can't go into details but hopefully if it's god's will the project will come true and more people will benefit from this."

9) Interview two :: Mohammed Al Mohameed, Bakery Manager
"Mohammed Al Mohameed, Deir El Zor resident. We are still resilient thanks to god. I have worked as a baker before; this is my profession, to feed all the people of Deir El Zor. It is true that we are besieged and diesel and yeast are hard to get, we are suffering, not just us but the people of Deir El Zor. Electricity cuts are often but we have a generator thanks god. Even if the regime deprives us of goods and electricity we are going to feed the people of Deir El Zor and the displaced. Daily we produce a ton or two. We work in the morning and another organization covers the night shift. The Euphrates organization affiliates to the council and the organizations of the outcasts."

25/1/2014 فيديو مصور بتاريخ

يُظهر مخبز يقع في المنطقة المحررة في ديرالزور شرق سوريا حيث وصل سعر زبطة الخبز الى ٥٠٠ ليرة سورية وهو ثمن خيالي.

هذا المخبز المهجور تم استثماره من قبل مجموعة من الشباب الذين يعتمدون على تبرعات فردية والمنظمات الخيرية. وتمكن المخبز من انتاج ربطة خبز سعرها ٢٥ ليرة سورية وتحتوي 10 أرغفة وهو سعر رمزي.

يقع هذا الفرن في حي الجبيلة الذي لا يبعد سوى بضعة أمتار عن جبهة القتال الجيش السوري ويقول القائمون على الفرن ان الانتاج يكفي حاجة ما يقارب الخمسمائة عائلة من الخبز في حي الجبيلة والأحياء المجاورة وهو يعمل لستة أيام في الاسبوع .

المقابلة الأولى مع المشرف على الفرن (ماجد العبوش) كان يعمل في مجال الخياطة قبل الثورة ليتحول إلى المجال الاغاني بعد الثورة

المقابلة الثانية مع المسؤول عن تشغيل الفرن (محمد المحيميد) مسؤول تشغيل الفرن.

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Death Trip from Egypt
Cairo
By zeer news
09 Apr 2014

Syrians who already left their country more than a year ago and fled to Cairo in search of a better life, are actually leaving Egypt to reach the European shores. As legal immigration is almost impossible, they look for the only possible way to travel: crossing the Mediterranean Sea by boat. Risking their life, leaving their business and paying more than $3000 per person, thousands of refugee Syrians reached Italy and moved to North Europe to seek asylum.

Some of them die during the trip, while others are caught by the Egyptian police while sailing the waters. Other refugees are jailed in several prisons in Alexandria and Beheira and are then deported to Lebanon, Turkey and Syria.

TRANSCRIPT:

Voice Over

It has been a year since the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria in Egypt, began receiving in large numbers of Syrian refugees fleeing the war in their homeland. When he first arrived in Egypt from Syria, a little over 10 months ago, 33 year old Alaa felt welcomed. However, like many Syrians in Egypt, Alaa’s life went from bad to worse after Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was deposed this past July. The situation has now gotten so bad that he is contemplating risking his life and being smuggled by boat to Italy.

Alaa
When we first arrived in Egypt Morsi was in power. At that time Egypt was welcoming Syrians. Everywhere we went, public or private, we were welcomed. When the political situation in Egypt changed everything else changed with it. When Egyptians encounter foreigners here it causes problems. People are stressed, they are dying in the sea just because they don't want to be alive anymore and their country “Syria” was destroyed. Indeed if I will have the chance I will leave. Life here is no longer possible. Our relations with the arabs are over, they don't want us anymore.

Voice Over
The trip from Alexandria to Italy is extremely dangerous, uncomfortable and expensive, costing around $3000. However, Laurence is so desperate to leave Egypt he is willing to take the risk and pay the money. He is now spending his days in his fiancé’s house, waiting for the call from the trafficker to go to Europe, where half of his family will be waiting for him.

Laurence
All over the world these trips are called “The death trip”. We do believe that we will die anyway, we have no life in any country because of the way the countries see the Syrians. The trip is in a fishing boat made to hold 40 to 50 people, but in fact it is carrying 400 people. The trip takes almost 5 to 6 days and you have to face all the risks. My parents trip was supposed to take 5 days to reach Italy, but the fishing boat was damaged and there were earthquakes in the sea of Cyprus. They saw death in front of their eyes, and they were out of water and food, and suffered from thirst and hunger. They spent 11 days at sea, 5 of which without eating or drinking, and they had to drink water from the engine, they really suffered before help arrived. They were stuck in the sea, they suffered too much on this trip. Some of them were injured, a girl lost her leg, a woman had a heart attack, and a child broke his hand. They were just left at sea, and if the red cross and the coast guards hadn't rescued them , they would have all been dead. All this suffering just to reach a country that respects human rights.

Voice Over
The Syrian war has generated one of the worst humanitarian crises in recent history. Syrian refugees now number in the millions, scattered both across Arab countries and in western ones. Europe accepts Syrian refugees if they are already inside European borders. However, if refugees outside Europe try to reach there through legal means, they will almost always be denied entry. The only alternative they have is illegal entry to the EU.

George
130.000 refugees registered in the UNHCR. I attended a meeting in Amman for UNHCR in Amman. The total number expected in the, it will be five million Syrians. Five million if the situation stays as it is.

Voice Over
These numbers are alarming, but they are only one part of a wider exodus of Syrians. They do not include Palestinian Syrians. Because they are Palestinians they cannot be registered by the UNHCR in Egypt. Until now, almost 5 thousand Syrians and Palestinian Syrians have left Egypt to reach Italy by boat. The departures are continuing, with almost 2 boats per week attempting the perilous journey.

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020 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
04 Apr 2014

In the poorest neighborhoods, refugees can find a small room for 100/200Tl (40/80$)/month. Sometimes refugees occupy empty houses. Life here is very hard in these situations because the rooms usually do no€™t have heating and running water. The situation is very bad and they wonder why nobody does anything.

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021 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
04 Apr 2014

The hygienic situation in the poorest buildings is bad. There is no heating or drinkable water. In this building, every family rents a room no larger than 25 square meters and usually has only a small window. The restructuring plan of Erdogan aims to destroy this old building and erect a new one that Syrian refugees could not afford rent.

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022 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
04 Apr 2014

Often families have been forced to separate due to the war. Many mothers and wives have sons and husbands who fight in a war. Women are often left to take care of the children and fend for themselves while the men remain in Syria. Some of these woman are forced to walk several kilometers everyday to pick up the aid distributed by the associations. Syrian Women in need often complain that after an initial effort on behalf of both the Turkish government and the international associations, they were left to their own devices.

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023 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
04 Apr 2014

35 year old Mahmoud (not his real name) escaped from Aleppo after being wounded and having surgery on his stomach. He came to live in a room with his family in Istanbul. He canno€™t work or walk very well.

"We were escaping from Aleppo and a rocket fell close to the car. Splinters exploded and struck me in my stomach and the leg. When I arrived to Turkey, in the center, they fixed my wounds. Thank God I survived, but now the situation is very bad, we are left to ourselves and we don't know what the future holds. I think I want to go back to my country when the war ends, I have my land in Syria. Inshallah€."

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025 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
04 Apr 2014

Children who canno€™t afford to go to school wander Istanbul's city center seeking handouts or finding illegal jobs where they are exploited. Many children work up to 14 hours per day for little pay.

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026 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
04 Apr 2014

The situation for Syrians in Turkey is still precarious. Since 2014, several demonstrations against Syrian refugees have taken place. At first welcomed by Erdogan, Syrians were left to their own devises. Those who can, try to immigrate and seek asylum in Europe. However, an increasing number of Syrian refugees are forced to live in limbo while they wait for the war to end and return to their country.

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Art Helps a Syrian Refugee Child Cope...
Bekaa
By Transterra Editor
03 Apr 2014

April 3rd, 2014

Bekaa Valley, Lebanon

The Lebanese NGO "Beyond" is helping a young Syrian refugee girl cope with psychological problems through art. After the death of her father in Syria, eleven year old Fatima fled the civil war with her mother, brother and sister to the Debagha Camp in Zahle in the eastern Bekaa Valley. But her mother died of Meningitis in January causing Fatima to isolate herself from her surroundings. Art lessons given by "Beyond" instructors are helping Fatima express herself and they say she has been able to improve her social communication skills through her drawings.
Social workers and activists from the NGO are visiting refugee camps in Lebanon to study the behavior of children and organize social and educational activities to help them.

Interviews:

Fatima:
My father is dead and we came here me and my mother and my sister and my brother, we came here and we had debts, we worked in harvesting potatoes, and then my mother died in the time of the storm.
I drew a house and our family, I drew two ducks and a rose covered arch, I drew a house and flowers all around, and the sea.

Racha Obeid - Social Worker (Beyond):
Throughout our research and our field trips, I noticed that Fatima was isolated when she sits in her classes, doesn’t communicate well with her friends, on her own in the playground, of course the death of her mother affected her and caused her emotional emptiness, lack of affection. Our purpose is to get her out if this condition. We directed her to take art classes to express herself and improve her artistic talent.

Khaled - Art Teacher:
At first she used to draw natural scenes, such as a house, trees … After what she went through she started saying: “I miss the sea, I want to be at the sea at watch the ships” so she started drawing the sea.
So I started teaching her how to express her feelings though drawing, and now she is being able to produce drawings.

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005 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
03 Apr 2014

Those who cannot spend too much for the rent share small basements or cellars. Many Syrian refugees canno€™t work in Turkey because they do no€™t have a residency permit.

Anas, 24 years old, escaped from Aleppo and works as a tailor in Istanbul without any job security. He left his family in Syria and is thinking of going back there to fight against the regime of Bashar al Assad.

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006 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
03 Apr 2014

A Syrian refugee shows his ID card and describes his arrest and torture at the hands of the Syrian police. On the ID there is a number which indicates which district a person is from. Based on the district, police can often venture a good guess as to a person's religion.

The person in the photo was arrested while coming back from University. According to him, the Police stopped him, checked his ID, and arrested him because he is Sunni. While the uprising in Syria has involved people of all religions and ethnicities, it is largely comprised of Sunni Muslims, who are also Syria's majority population.

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015 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
02 Apr 2014

Middle class Syrians are able rent a flat for 300/400Tl (125/165$) near the neighborhood affected by the Erdogan's restructuring plan. The plan was set up to re-build some areas of Istanbul. These houses will soon be destroyed to make way for more expensive, modern high rise buildings.

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016 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
02 Apr 2014

Nahla and her family live in a small house with two bedrooms and a kitchen. There are ten people leaving there with seven children. All of the families fled Damascus. The men of the family work as carpenters or bricklayers to raise the money to pay the rent and food.

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017 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
02 Apr 2014

Sivan, a 45 year old man from Qamisli, has been in Istanbul with his family for five months and he canno€™t find a job. He is Syrian-Kurdish and this makes it more difficult to find work in Istanbul. He says he came to Istanbul by bus. Due the fact that he cannot find a job, he is not able to pay his rent. His rent is three months overdue and the the owner of the flat in which he lives in wants to force him out. He does no€™t know where he and his family will do in future.

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018 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
02 Apr 2014

16 year old Omar is from Hasakeh. He and his family came to Istanbul on foot, helped by a smuggler, after paying 200$ per person.

He does no€™t go to school and works 14 hours per day as a button sewer to raise 150 Tl (65$) per week to help pay the rent of his house.

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019 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
02 Apr 2014

Farah comes from Damascus and has been in Istanbul for one year. When the war started in Syria she was pregnant. Her husband came to Istanbul and found a job and is able rent a house, which they share with another family. In this neighborhood, far from the touristic center of Istanbul, Turkish people are more polite and help Syrians by giving them food. The Mosque helps refugees by giving them bread and rice.

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011 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
01 Apr 2014

According to the UNHCR, Syrian children (from 0 to 17 years old) account for about 55% of Syrian refugees in Turkey. Many of them have lived through traumatic events and have witnessed war first hand. Some of them suffer from psychological disorders resulting from what they have witnessed in Syria. Several associations were founded by the Syrian community to try and help Syrian children cope with their trauma, but lack of access to proper care is still a major problem.

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012 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
01 Apr 2014

One of the first things that the associations try to provide is education. Children in this school continue to study according to the Syrian curriculum. Some books are re-written and passages praising Bashar al Assad are deleted. In this school, Turkish and English are also taught.

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013 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
01 Apr 2014

A little girl sings a song about war:

"€œWe came to your feast, Through your celebration we are asking you, why now do we not have any feast?
O€™ World, my land is burned, my free land is stolen. Our sky is dreaming, asking days, where is the beautiful shiny sun?
Where are the pigeons flocks?
My little land, little like me, return peace to it and give us back our childhood,
Give us our childhood,
Give us, give us Peace."€

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014 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
01 Apr 2014

The flag used by the revolutionaries is still hung in all classrooms. Some schools publicly took a stand in support of the Syrian revolution, hanging the flag of the revolution on their walls.

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Sample media
Yalla school
lebanon alya
By Ali Khedr
01 Apr 2014

A short film about a small school called Yalla , founded by a group of activists to support Syrian refugee children in Lebanon by teaching them on ideal bases, improving their life skill and giving them a chance to have better lives

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001 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
31 Mar 2014

The wall near the Fatih Mosque bears a slogan reading:

"€œYesterday Bosnia, today Syria"€.

The Syrian community seeking shelter in Turkey numbers about 1.5 million people. Syrian refugees try to reestablish their lives in Istanbul, looking to the longterm.

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007 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
31 Mar 2014

The Syrian community has founded many associations that help Syrian refugees in Istanbul. Near Aksaray, the Syrian Noor Association provides refugees with a doctor and a dentist. Some refugees suffer from post-traumatic Stress disorders, especially young people directly affected by the fighting. However, lack of access to psychological care is still a major problem.

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008 Syrian Odyssey
Istanbul, Istanbul
By Mauro Prandelli
31 Mar 2014

The €œSyrian Noor Association€ collects medicine in order to distribute them in the center or to send them every month to Syria. The Turkish Government allows them to do so, but does no€™t help in any way.