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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 2
By Karim Mostafa
21 Apr 2014

Zinnahtul Islam, a football player in the Savar team, is one of many local volunteer rescue workers. He is holding the photo of a woman he rescued.

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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 1
By Karim Mostafa
21 Apr 2014

One year after the tragedy, the rubbles of the Rana Plaza building are still there. Dusty pieces of jeans and flowery cloth, strewn across the remnants of what used to be ceilings and floors. Street kids roam around the rubbles searching for pieces of iron and other things they can sell.

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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 3
By Karim Mostafa
21 Apr 2014

Rehanna, who used to work in Rana Plaza, lost one of her legs in the accident.

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Rana Plaza and The Long Recovery 6
By Karim Mostafa
19 Apr 2014

The location where the eight-story building Rana Plaza once stood.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 7
By Karim Mostafa
19 Apr 2014

Nurjahan Begum had two daughters working in Rana Plaza. The youngest, is alive – the other one is still missing.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 8
By Karim Mostafa
19 Apr 2014

One year after the Rana Plaza collapsed, people are still digging through the rubble.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 9
By Karim Mostafa
19 Apr 2014

Signs saying "Rana Plaza, Tazreen – Never Again", on the site where Rana Plaza used to be.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 10
By Karim Mostafa
19 Apr 2014

Amjad Hussein, who worked on the fourth floor of the Rana Plaza, remembers falling and feeling an incredible pain. Then, everything went black. When he regained consciousness eleven days later, both of his legs were missing. He's now trying his new prosthetic legs for the first time.

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Rana Plaza and the long recovery 11
By Karim Mostafa
17 Apr 2014

Hasina used to work on the 6th floor of Rana Plaza. The building's four upper floors had been constructed illegally. It was built without observing proper building codes and laws, and using poor materials. Hasina's arm was hurt when the building collapsed. She neither can nor want to go back to "the garments".

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 13
By Karim Mostafa
17 Apr 2014

Amjad Hussein lost both his legs in the Rana Plaza accident. He's now trying his new legs for the first time. "I feel strange, like I'm floating. Not connected to the ground. But God gave me my life back."

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 14
By Karim Mostafa
16 Apr 2014

Younus Ali and his daughter. The man had never heard of Rana Plaza until the morning of April 24, 2013. He was visiting a nephew in Savar when he heard the sound of the building collapsing. He ran to building and joined local rescuers who were the first on the site. He saved three people before being hit unconscious. Today, he cannot move the lower part of his body.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 15
By Karim Mostafa
15 Mar 2014

In a small alley, not far from the hospital where victims were brought, survivors have a chance at a better future. A small factory was opened by two volunteer rescuers. Profits are divided between the employees.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery
Savar, Bangladesh
By Karim Mostafa
15 Mar 2014

One year ago, on April 24 2013, the Rana Plaza, an eight-story commercial building, collapsed in Savar, a sub-district of Dhaka, Bangladesh. The building hosted clothing factories, a bank, apartments, and several other shops. 1,129 people died and approximately 2,515 people were injured. The incident was the deadliest ever in the history of the Bangladesh garment industry.

Today, injured survivors are learning to live again despite physical injuries, including amputated limbs, and psychological trauma. This story looks into the victims’ lives one year after the tragedy; from the ongoing work of the garment factories to the only physiotherapy clinic in Bangladesh, where some of the lucky survivors are receiving treatment.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 05
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
09 Mar 2014

Shahnaz Begum, 36, jumped from 3rd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building to escape the deadly fire that permanently damaged her eye. She sustained serious spinal injuries from the fall.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 07
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
09 Mar 2014

Hasan Mia, 30, jumped from the 2nd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building when it went ablaze two years ago. He still struggles with mental illness.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 12
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
09 Mar 2014

Shama, 20, jumped from 2nd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building to escape the fire that killed 117 people in 2012. She sustained serious injuries to her leg and the right side of her body that still cause her complications two years later.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 14
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
09 Mar 2014

Rowshonara, 37, jumped from 2nd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building to escape the deadly blaze. She still fights to overcome the deep mental and emotional trauma.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 08
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Khadeza Akter Sume, 20, jumped from the 2nd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building when a fire killed 117 people in 2012. She still struggles to cope with the trauma.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 11
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Anzu, 45, jumped from 4th floor of the Tazreen Fashion building, which burnt down in 2012 killing 1167 people. Two years later, she is haunted by the fire and has trouble sleeping.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 15
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Mahinur, 32, jumped from 3rd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building to escape the deadly blaze. Two years later, she remains psychologically scarred by the traumatic event.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 09
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Sume Akter, 23, broke her leg and hand when she jumped from the 2nd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building to escape the blaze that killed 117 of her colleagues in 2012.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 10
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Reshma, 20, jumped from 2nd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building when a fire broke out that killed 117 people in 2012. She still suffers backbone and leg problems due to injuries she sustained from the fall.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 13
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Banu Rani, 35, was severely injured when she jumped from the 2nd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building to escape the blaze.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 16
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Moushumi Begum, 24, was pregnant with her daughter Zinti when she jumped from 3rd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building. Her daughter is alive and well, but Moushumi remains deeply scarred by the fire that took 117 of her colleagues' lives.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 01
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Morsheda Begum, 27, jumped from 2nd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building to escape the deadly 2012 factory fire, breaking several bones

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 03
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Rupa Begum, 26, jumped from 2nd floor of the building, breaking her nose as she fell to the ground.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 04
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Mahfuza Akter, 20, jumped from 2nd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building when went ablaze in 2012, killing 117 of her coworkers. Two years later, the emotional and psychological trauma remains.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 06
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Afroza Begum, 26, jumped from 3rd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building. Since the fire, she has struggled with mental illness.

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Garment Factory Fire Survivors 02
Saver
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Mar 2014

Anzu Ara, 26, jumped from 2nd floor of the Tazreen Fashion building to escape the factory fire that claimed 117 lives. "Sometimes the intensity of the pain drives me mad," she said. "I break things in desperation. I wake up screaming 'fire! fire!' at night. I can't sleep."

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Made in Bangladesh (23 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (22 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (21 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (20 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (19 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (17 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (16 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (15 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (14 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (12 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (11 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.