Thumb sm
Srebrenica 17
Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By Michael Biach
11 Jul 2014

Relatives of victims of the 1995 genocide in Srebrenica are waling in front of the former UN barracks in Potocari, the place where thousands of Bosniaks tried to seek shelter from Bosnian Serb forces under Ratko Mladic. The UN was not able to protect the refugees who were take away by paramilitars and army personal to be executed. 8.372 people were killed after the enclave of Srebrenica fell, nearly all of the unarmed civililans who were systemetically executed.

Thumb sm
Srebrenica 19
Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By Michael Biach
11 Jul 2014

Bosnian women are mourning prior to the mass burial in Potocari during the 19th annual commemoration of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide. In the back the men are praying in front of the coffins of 175 newly identified victims found in mass graves all over the country.

Thumb sm
Srebrenica 16
Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By Michael Biach
11 Jul 2014

Relatives of Nermin and Samir Selimovic are burying the coffins of the then 19 and 23 year old boys during the 19th anniversary of the annual commemoration of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide.

Thumb sm
Srebrenica 20
Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By Michael Biach
11 Jul 2014

Coffins with victims of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide are burried during the 19th annual commemoration in Potocari.

Thumb sm
The People of Pingelap (27 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
26 Mar 2008

One of three parts of the 1,5 x 1 sq-km small Pingelap Atoll. Pingelap is located in the pacific ocean and belongs to the Federated States of Micronesia. About 350 km south-east from the main island Pohnpei.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

Thumb sm
The People of Pingelap (26 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
24 Mar 2008

The only paved road on Pingelap. The houses were build by the Japanese occupiers during the 2nd world war. After the Japanese were defeated by the Americans, the inhabitants of Pingelap moved into these houses.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

Thumb sm
The People of Pingelap (25 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
23 Mar 2008

Edwin, a colorblind man. He sits in his bedroom to protect his eyes from the midday sun.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

Thumb sm
The People of Pingelap (16 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
19 Mar 2008

A color-blind girl covers her eyes against the bright light from outside.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

Thumb sm
The People of Pingelap (24 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
19 Mar 2008

An old man takes a rest under a mat.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

Thumb sm
The People of Pingelap (23 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
15 Mar 2008

An 11 year-old colorblind boy protects his eyes from the bright sun.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.