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Eid Ul Adha Preparation in Karachi, P...
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
08 Aug 2019

Pakistanis are preparing to celebrate Eid ul Adha on August 12. "Everyone is busy nowadays preparing for Eid ul Adha, buying a good animal to sacrifice. Eid al-Adha. Feast of the Sacrifice, also called the "Festival of the Sacrifice", is the second of two Islamic holidays celebrated worldwide each year (the other being Eid al-Fitr), and considered the holier of the two. It honours the willingness of Ibrahim (Abraham) to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God's command.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Transporter delivering services at its peak during the month of Eid ul Adha as Muslims purchasing sacrificial animals from the Animal Stock Market from the Outskirts of Metropolitan City, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Transporter delivering services at its peak during the month of Eid ul Adha as Muslims purchasing sacrificial animals from the Animal Stock Market from the Outskirts of Metropolitan City, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Boy sitting near sacrificial cow as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor cutting grass for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Children playing with their Sacrificial goat as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Young girl showing her affection with sacrificial goat as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder grabbing sack of grass for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor selling foddering goods and displaying jewelry for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor cutting grass for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor Weighting grass for customers as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Customer purchasing Fodder for his sacrificial cow at makeshift Stall where vendor selling foddering goods and displaying jewelry for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Sample media
TALPAPRIL2017-22
London
By Tom Price
04 May 2016

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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Frustration and Defiance in Aleppo
Aleppo
By rami.zien
16 Feb 2016

A survivor in the rebel-held area of Aleppo expresses frustration at international support for their cause and defiance in the face of the latest assault by forces of the Assad government.

Ibrahim, Citizen:

On the latest updates we here in the Castello area of Aleppo I can say that there is kind of a drop in the fighting (FSA) brigades are bringing against this big offensive. They (the FSA) are not being strict in taking the decision to stop this farce and save us from the force that is threatening us everyday to cut the main road of Aleppo. I wish that everyone in Aleppo, civilians and fighters, would come up with a solution to stop this farce that is threatening the people inside Aleppo and specifically the liberated areas. We are subject to threatens day and night. As they say, the mother of a threatened person doesn’t sleep, however a mother of a dead person sleeps. Where are the solutions to stop the threatens? Where is the FSA? Why is it absent? What will it do? He (The FSA) is available with us in all the liberated areas that might be under siege at anytime, hopefully not but this is the truth for now.

03:34
Our situation now is a result of the dirty political money and I hope that this stops at some point.

04:00
Question: What about the support from Saudi Arabia and Turkey?

Answer: It is only words, saying that they support the Syrian people. however we have been left alone.

Question: what about the ceasefire?

Answer: Nothing at all. In fact every time there is a ceasefire and there are talks to interfere in the Syrian war, more people die. Just leave us alone! We do not want support from anybody. In fact we are able to manage ourselves and we will be fine. We do not want anyone saying that we support the Syrian people. The Syrian people are standing alone and no one supports us. All what we ask you is to provide us with anti-aircraft weapons or a decision that imposes a no-fly zone, and we can deal with the rest. We can give you their dead bodies and their heads in coffins made in Aleppo.

Question: What about the Russian offensives on your city?

Answer: They are trying to push the citizens to leave and abandon their hometown in Aleppo, They want to change the demographics of the area and replace the original citizens with new ones. They want to spread fear all over the area as if they are telling us to revolt against the fighting brigades in our city. They are pushing the situation to be more complex in forcing us to flee our lands and change the demographics. The Rojava area is the biggest proof of what they are trying to do. This is proof that they are pushing Syria towards division.

Question: Why are you still here and have not taken refuge elsewhere yet?

Answer: This is my hometown, where do you want me to move? This is my town and I will keep defending it in my own way and by all the means available to me to do so until I die or win.

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Beirut Scenic and Street Shots
Beirut, Lebanon
By mchreyteh
05 Feb 2016

Various shots of Beirut streets, people using smart phones and walking in Beirut Souks shopping center.

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Beirut Authors Hope to Inspire Reader...
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
02 May 2015

Mono Street, Beirut, Lebanon

May 2, 2015

On the first Saturday of every month, professional antique sellers, second-hand book vendors and everyone else who wants to sell and buy books gather on Mono Street.

Among these vendors are also authors who took the chance to reach out to potential readers directly. One of the authors addresses women, and hopes to encourage them to overcome the difficulties of their lives with short, uplifting poems.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of people passing by bookstands
Close-up of books on a stand
Various of man holding a book
Pan right of the street
Various of books on a stand
Various of a female vendor behind her stand
Close-up of a book titled ‘Drole de Visite du Musee National de Beyrouth’
Various of books
Mid shot on Annie
Mid shot of two people reading
Various of a store for books and art
Various of people in the market
Close-up of ‘Spark Your Imagination’ books
Medium of books on a stand
Various of Houwaida Bitar sitting behind her desk
Close up shot on Spark your mind stand
Various of a man and woman playing the drums
Various of handmade accessories
Various of Grace Tawile behind her stand
Wide of street book market

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Living Conditions “Extremely Bad” in ...
Jarabulus
By TTM Contributor 34
13 Feb 2015

Jarabulus, Syria
February 13, 2015

This video offers a rare glimpse of daily life in Jarabulus, an ISIS-controlled Syrian town on the border with Turkey, located around 120 km northwest of Aleppo.
Video contains interviews with two anonymous residents who complained about their economic conditions, saying that basic commodities are unaffordable while there are few employment opportunities.

The footage, which was shot secretly, shows what is believed to be ISIS headquarters destroyed by international coalition-led airstrikes. It also shows local residents in markets and agriculture fields inside and near Jarabulus.

Fighters from the Nusra Front, considered the Syrian branch of al-Qaeda, took over the town in 2013 and later pledged allegiance to ISIS. More than 200,000 Kurds and Arabs in Jarabulus and the surrounding villages have lived under ISIS since early 2014.

The name of the contributor has been withheld for security reasons.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Traveling of fields/ road sign “Jarablus”
Wide of destroyed bridge on river
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of destroyed buildings
Wide of ISIS religious teachings
Traveling of street
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of official printed announcements by ISIS posted outside a building/ close up of seal “The Islamic State, Department of Agriculture, Jarabulus District”
L-R pan of field
Wide of children sliding down a hill
Various of boat rowing in the Euphrates River
Wide of planted vegetables
Wide/ L-R pan of orchard
Various of sheep grazing
Close-up of a person cutting firewood
Various of woman cooking using a stove
Various of a woman milking a cow
Various of oil containers for sale on the roadside
Medium of man at fish market
Various of vegetables for sale at market
Wide of field and sheep herd
Traveling of people in an outdoor market
Various of clothes and shoes for sale
Various of spices for sale
Various of market
Various of crowd at market
Various of food items for sale
Wide/ traveling inside health center

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
09:54 – 12:16

“The situation is not good. I cannot say that we are comfortable. Our situation is very bad. A diesel barrel costs 20,000 [Syrian pounds]. How can we afford it? A gas canister costs 4,000 [Syrian pounds] and a liter of kerosene costs 225 pounds. A pack of bread costs 130 pounds. How can we afford this? I have two young men who are unemployed. Where can they go? “The [Islamic] State is good. They have caught the debauched and the thieves who have hurt people, but they provide electricity and water for only two hours [a day]. For more than a year, people have barely seen electricity. It is provided during two hours but the grid is overloaded and the current is interrupted after half an hour. The bakery was not functioning; they repaired it but bread is expensive. We cannot afford it. I bake bread myself.

“As for warplanes… Our houses have been fractured. These countries have formed a coalition against us. We live in a border town. Bombing goes on night and day.

“They should have bombed the tyrant who has deprived us of everything. He has ruined everything. Whenever our children went out to look for work they were accused of being criminals and caught. All our young men have been put in jail. What can we do? The situation is bad.

“We use firewood. We had olive trees but we cut them down and burned them in the stove to have heat in this cold weather.

“I have a cow. Animal feed is expensive. A kilogram of hay costs 50 pounds. A bale of barely that contains 40 kg costs 2,700 pounds. We need this cow to feed us. All the people who have cattle suffer the same crisis that we do. It is not only me; all of us suffer a bad situation. We wish that we die. There is not a single house that has not been fractured due to warplanes.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
12:17 – 13: 19

“Conditions under the Islamic State are extremely bad. Under the Islamic State, a barrel of diesel costs more than $100. A ton of firewood costs 22,000 [pounds]. This crisis has never been witnessed before.

“Nothing has improved under the Islamic State. Everything has deteriorated. They should create employment for the people. The people work in agricultural lands, which do not provide any revenue. We have abandoned our land. Not all the plots are being cultivated. People have cut down olive groves and used them as firewood. The situation is extremely miserable. There are no services and foreign countries are not providing aid. The Islamic State is in control of the situation. Turkey has closed the border and aid cannot reach people. The situation is very bad under the Islamic State.”

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Eurozone: Lithuanians Adopt New Currency
Silale, Lithuania
By Berta Tilmantaite
31 Dec 2014

Fireworks in Lithuania marked not only the beginning of the New Year, but also the beginning of the new currency in the country. Over the next two weeks, Lithuanian litas that had been used since 1993 are being replaced by the euro. Lithuania is the last Baltic country after Estonia and Latvia to adopt the euro, doing so to attract more investment, eliminate money-changing costs, reduce the borrowing from - and maybe even the influence of - Russia.

“We used rubbles, talonas, then switched to litas, and now will have to get used to euros,” says Zigmantas while familiarising himself with the new currency on the last day of the year.

The litas was actually first introduced in 1922 after World War I, when Lithuania declared independence. In 1939 Germany annexed the Klaipėda region of Lithuania and the reichsmark replaced the litas until 1941, when the Soviet Union annexed Lithuania and Soviet rubbles were introduced to the country. The talonas – a temporary currency of Lithuania – was used from 1991 to 1993 before reintroducing the litas. Now, from the 1st of January, euros will take the place of Lithuania’s national currency.

“There will be a lot of confusion,” says Zita, Zigmanta’s wife. “I can’t see very well so it’s not easy to tell litas coins from euro coins. It will take time to get used to it.”

Zita spent time watching news on TV to learn about the currency switch in Lithuania and asked her children to change her savings in litas to euros. The switch will be confusing not only because of the physical similarities between the two currencies, but also because of the exchange rate, which is not the easiest to calculate by memory. To help himself and his wife Zita to convert litas to euros, Zigmantas has drawn a chart with different amounts of litas and their equivalent values in euros.

However, the younger generation isn’t worried. Guoda, an 18-year-old student, got a few packages of euro coins as a present for Christmas. Apparently, euro bags were among the most popular presents this year.

“I’ll just put everything together,” Guoda says. “I will try to spend litas first and then will start using euros.”

For the first two weeks on the 2015, Lithuanians can use both currencies to pay for goods and services, however they will only be issued change in euros.

Not all Lithuanians are happy about the change, though. Many worry about rising prices. Others see the loss of the litas as the loss of the nation’s identity. This gave rise to a small artistic movement of ‘crying litas’ – where people started to draw tears on litas notes to make it look as if famous people shown on the notes were crying.

Businessmen, of course, took advantage of the trend and started to produce clothes, bags, playing cards and other everyday goods featuring litas, a very famous symbol among sentimental Lithuanians.

After Lithuania adopted the euro, there are only 11 different currencies remaining in circulation in the European Union.

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Souk El-Khan in Hasbaya, an Old Style...
Hasbaya, Lebanon
By [email protected]
28 Dec 2014

Hasbaya, Lebanon

December 29, 2014

Souk El-Khan is one of the oldest public markets in Lebanon. Located in between Hasbayya, Arkoub and Marjaayoun, it is attended by the merchants and citizens from the South and the Bekaa. Also, in previous times, in was used by the people of Houla in the South Galilee in Palestine; and Houran and the Golan in Syria for all kinds of dealing and trading. Some of the market’s most common goods were cattle, olives and local farming products like seeds, lemons and bananas. Moreover, the market was used as a pit stop for herds of bulls, camels and donkeys coming from Mount Amel, Safad and Houla regions towards the Bekaa and Syria.

The market was given its name after the great hotel built by Wali Abu Bakr al-Shihabi in 1350. The hotel was built with old stones, lime and white sand, and maintains its traditional feel until now. Every Tuesday, merchants spread their carpets under tents of cloth and display their goods on rocks, wooden boards, or in front of their animals and old cars.

Since 2005, the market has witnessed a series of modernization and sophistication. Through a cultural project funded by USAID along with the implementation of Mercy Corps, which completed a full integrated outline, the market became not only a commercial epicenter but also a station to various cultural, artistic and social activities, a space for recreation in times of holidays and festivals, and a popular destination in the various political events and festivals.

The market occupies more than 30,000 square meters. All along the Hasbani river’s west bank, popular stalls are spread, offering nuts, falafel, and grilled meats to attract the people’s attention. Also found are affordable goods brought by traders from Nabatieh, the South and the Bekaa Valley. Moreover, the market has, since 2006, become the intent of many UNIFIL forces.

Nowadays, the market is cut by a tight road for the cars, around which small shops are present and to its sides tents are mounted to handle the products. There are many alleys and side streets to the market. To the right of the road, between eucalyptus and cypress trees, products like clothes, dresses, carpets, shoes and home utensils are displayed. To the left of the road, all kinds of fruits, vegetables and sweets are displayed. To the south, we find a big market for meats and barbecue products. Also to the south, exists a big animal market used for trading cattle. Additionally, there is a section for plants: fruit trees, forest trees and various flowers. The noises, sounds, discussions and variety of local dialects show the market goer that social interaction plays a major role in the market.

Hasbayya has kept the market within its interest. It has therefore cooperated with foreign funding entities aimed at updating the market’s infrastructure, while preserving its old-fashioned traditions and feel. Consequently, the work was distributed over 8,000 square meters, in addition to the renovation of the Khan over four thousand square meters. The project included the construction of eighty shops roofed with tiles, surrounded with parking lots that fit up to two hundred and fifty cars. Distributed inside are green spaces that hold old trees. In addition, the project holds a slaughterhouse, bathrooms and a multi-purpose exhibition room built of concrete, with a meat market on its roof. This is the heritage of Souk El-Khan. Also, the project includes a public park equipped with seats and amusements for children with ongoing security under the municipality’s supervision.

Shot List

Wide shot of Marjaayoun area
Close up on the sign boards
Various shots of the traffic, the merchants, and the people in the area of the market
Various shots of cattle in the market
Various shots of butchers in the market and people eating meat.

SOUNDBITES

(01:11-02:08)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

Al-Khan market is the oldest vegetable market in Lebanon. A bit down from here, there used be a khan [a hotel], where people from many countries used to stay and sell their merchandise on camels and horses.
I am 70 years old now. I used to come here with my father to sell iron tools, for agriculture and so. Until this day, I still come here, I made a family, built a house, bought properties, and my pocket is full, thank God, all because of this market.

(02:32-03:08)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

Al-Khan market is located in the center of Marjaayoun area in Hasbayya, it dates from the ottoman times. It is a very ancient market, and as we said, the inhabitants of the area come here to sell their products – grains, cattle, grapes, figs, nuts and almonds, and vegetables.

(03:51-04:07)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

We have been coming here for 20 years. We have to come to the market to trade and sell.
Interviewer: What do you sell?
I sell cattle. I have a butcher shop and I sell cattle.

(04:36-05:06)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

It is a very old market, over 200 years old. Caravans used to arrive here carrying agricultural products, silk, and fabrics. There used to be a khan a bit down from here; it used to be a station for merchants and their cattle. There, they were able rest and then to continue their journey to the south.

(05:18-05:35)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

Now it is all about money, you buy something and you pay for it. Before, it used to be a trade system. People brought chickpeas, and took tomatoes in exchange for them, or exchange cabbage for bring tomatoes. Now, this does not take place anymore.

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Damascus: 800-Year-Old Bathhouse Endu...
Damascus
By TTM Contributor 4
08 Sep 2014

September 9, 2014
Damascus, Syria

Buried deep the historic al-Hamidiya Market in Damascus, one of the oldest traditional bathhouses in the city continues its business as usual, despite the ongoing war in Syria. Established in 1169, the Nour al-Din al-Shaheed bathhouse is one of the best examples of unadulterated Damascene history. It's cavernous bathing rooms and reception area have changed little over the years and guests can still enjoy an opportunity to experience a custom that has endured centuries of siege, occupation, and war.

Translation:

(04:51) "I am Majed Abdul Rahman, I work in Nour al-Din al-Shahid public bath. This bath consists of 4 sections: the outside, inside, steam room and the massage and exfoliating room. We have grooms [men about to get married] coming here almost daily. When they come here they use the exfoliating and the massage room, then they shower and after that, they go to the outside section and change the towels, drink some tea and [smoke] nargileh [water pipe], rest, get dressed, pay, then leave. There are lots of public baths, but this bath is special as it is old and cultural, provides a nice experience, and is very communal, they [guests] are allowed to bring food with them." (05:53)

(05:54) "First of all, my work is between Lebanon and Syria, I come to Syria every week, and I cannot come here without passing by the bathroom and bathing here in Souk al-Hamidiya. Every time I come here I have to roam around Damascus, and I cross all this distance from Lebanon to Syria so I can enjoy this bath. Honestly, we do not have baths like that in Lebanon, you can only find it here in Souk al-Hamidiya. The visit to the bathroom is very comforting and relaxing, you forget bout all your troubles at work in Lebanon and you forget about it here in Souk al-Hamidiya. You feel like you went back in time, to the era of your ancestors, and this is something we lack in Lebanon." (06:38)

(06:39) "I come to this public bath with my friends regularly, we are a group of students, we come here to see each other, enjoy our time, the atmosphere here is nice, and it is very relaxing." (06:55)

(06:56) "We are a group of friends, we come here every once and a while, we really like it here and we enjoy our time. I advise every man to come here so he can experience the old culture through this public bath that has been around for over 1,000 years." (07:10)

Shotlist:
Various shots of Souk al-Hamidiya

Various shots of the entrance of the bathhouse

Various shots of the bathhouse (exterior section)

Various shots of the bathhouse (interior section)

various shots of the steam room while its empty

Various shots of the steam room

Various shots of the exfoliating room

Various shots of people inside the exfoliating room

Various shots of the massage room

A shot of a person leaving the interior section

Various shots show the services provided in the bathhouse, such as tea and shisha

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Gazans Rush to Buy Food During Ceasefire
Gaza City
By Daniel Van Moll
18 Jul 2014

July 17, 2014
Gaza City

Residents of Gaza rush to local markets to buy food during a five hour, UN imposed ceasefire on July 17, 2014. Due to the ongoing conflict with Israel, residents have been trapped in their homes by fighting and food supplies have been running out.

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Gazans Rush to Buy Food
By Transterra Editor
17 Jul 2014

Toy weapons being sold on a public market in Gaza City on July 17th, 2014.

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Gazans Rush to Buy Food
By Daniel Van Moll
17 Jul 2014

After the UN demanded a five hour ceasefire, people returned to the recently abandoned streets of Gaza City to stock up on much needed supplies before hostilities resumed. July 17th, 2014.

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Gazans Rush to Buy Food
By Daniel Van Moll
17 Jul 2014

After the UN demanded a five hour ceasefire, people returned to the recently abandoned streets of Gaza City to stock up on much needed supplies before hostilities resumed. July 17th, 2014.

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Gazans Rush to Buy Food
By Daniel Van Moll
17 Jul 2014

After the UN demanded a five hour ceasefire, people returned to the recently abandoned streets of Gaza City to stock up on much needed supplies before hostilities resumed. July 17th, 2014.

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Gazans Rush to Buy Food
By Daniel Van Moll
17 Jul 2014

After the UN demanded a five hour ceasefire, people returned to the recently abandoned streets of Gaza City to stock up on much needed supplies before hostilities resumed. July 17th, 2014.

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Gazans Rush to Buy Food
By Daniel Van Moll
17 Jul 2014

After the UN demanded a five hour ceasefire, people returned to the recently abandoned streets of Gaza City to stock up on much needed supplies before hostilities resumed. July 17th, 2014.

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Bomb Blast in Abuja Shopping District
By Uyi Amadin
26 Jun 2014

June 25, 2014
Abuja, Nigeria

Rescue workers scramble to contain the aftermath of a bomb blast in a crowded shopping district in the Nigerian capital of Abuja. Authorities reported that 21 people were killed and 17 injured.

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Egyptians Discuss Economy Ahead of Ra...
Cairo
By Amir Nabil
11 Jun 2014

11, June, 2014
Cairo, Egypt
Video shows dates market in Shubra, Cairo, prior to Ramadan, and interviews with people talking about the market situation in Egypt.

Mohamad Mustafa al-Bahrawi, Employee:
“Things are available but very expensive, and it is not obtainable by people with limited wages, this situation might be because things are imported from outside of Egypt or because of the greed of merchants”.

Um Eisa, Dates sales person:
“The market situation is really good and there is a huge turn out to buy things, and the prices are reasonable and obtainable by everybody except for the Syrian "Amr aldin" (a type of sweets made of apricot), which is a bit expensive. The turn out is huge because of their excitement for president al-Sisi”.

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Coral Triangle
Coral Triangle
By Mark_Esplin
10 Jun 2014

The Coral Triangle is one of the world’s most important natural resources. It is an area of ocean that covers 5.4 million km2, where more biodiversity can be found than anywhere else on Earth.

The 3,000+ species of fish, and vast coral reefs, provide livelihoods and food for an estimated 130 million people in the region. Millions more throughout the world also benefit from the bounty of natural resources, provided by the Coral Triangle.

But all is not well in paradise. Scientists, environmentalists, economists and governments, are increasingly worried for the future of this ecosystem. In the last forty years alone, the Coral Triangle has incurred substantial losses of 40% to its reefs and mangroves.

Projections suggest this rate of degradation is likely to continue, or increase into the future. With such significant numbers of people reliant on this natural resource, there is a potential catastrophe of global proportions waiting to happen.

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Syrians in Central Damascus Discuss P...
Damascus
By TTM Contributor 4
31 May 2014

May 31, 2014
Damascus, Syria

Video shows night shots of the Souq al-Hamidiyya historic market in the old city of Damascus. Shoppers are asked their opinions on the Syrian Presidential Election.

Speakers:

Ali Hijazi, Coffee Shop Worker:
"Concerning the social situation, it seems normal, the streets are crowded and it is improving rapidly. Shops and cafes are receiving customers, people are out at all times, nine, ten, even after eleven and twelve you can still find people outside. Everything is improving, and now it is summer, so people go out more. Tourism has decreased, but still the situation is improving."

Abu Ibrahim, Visitor from Qamishli:
"I am from Qamishli, I came to Damascus and brought my son to visit a doctor. We have been hearing from biased TV channels that the situation in Damascus at night is scary and there is bombing and shelling. However, here we are and we haven’t seen any of that, the situation is very calm and normal."

Rasha, Resident:
"First of all I want to salute Damascus and our President, and I want to note that all people are happy and out on the streets at night. There is nothing to worry about and I sincerely hope the situation will improve more because there is nothing as amazing as Damascus. May God protect our president."

Waed, Resident:
"Everything is fine, we are outside, it is 9:30 at night now and there is nothing to worry about. If any uncomfortable situation was sensed we wouldn’t have gone out at night."

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Iraqi Kurdistan Second Hand Market 4
Suleimaniyah, Iraq
By Jacob Russell
22 Mar 2014

Second hand clothing on display in a shop (with disco lights installed) outside of the main bazaar in Sulaimaniah in the semi-autonomous region of Iraqi Kurdistan.

Sulaimaniyah, alongside other cities in Iraq, has a large second hand market inside the Bazaar. Clothes, furniture and electronics can all be found in separate areas of the market. The clothes are usually donated in Europe, North America and Korea, and sold on through a series of intermediary companies until they reach markets in the developing world. Donors are often unaware that their donations are being traded for profit rather than going to charity.

Traders in Sulaimaniyah second-hand market buy clothes by the kilo for prices ranging from $1.50 per kilo for unsorted bales to $5 per kilo for a bale of sorted items. Prices in the bazaar vary according to quality and the trader but typically a t-shirt will cost around $3 and a jacket $10-$20.

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Iraqi Kurdistan Second Hand Market 8
Suleimaniyah, Iraq
By Jacob Russell
02 Feb 2014

People haggle over shoes for sale in the second hand clothes market in Sulaimaniyah in the semi-autonomous region of Iraqi Kurdistan.

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Iraqi Kurdistan Second Hand Market 10
Sulaimaniyah, Iraq
By Jacob Russell
02 Feb 2014

A woman walks through an uncovered section of the second hand clothes market in Sulaimaniyah in the semi-autonomous region of Iraqi Kurdistan. Less widely known are the huge profits that are generated between donation and sale in a market like Sulaimaniyah’s. Dr. Andrew Brooks of King’s College, London, has noted the “hidden professionalism” of the used clothing trade. Exact and up-to-date figures as to the value of the trade are hard to come by because of a lack of regulation and accountability but the global trade in used clothing is estimated to be in excess of $1 billion.

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Iraqi Kurdistan Second Hand Market 25
Sulaimaniyah, Iraq
By Jacob Russell
02 Feb 2014

Two boys are caught in a shaft of light as they walk through a covered section of the second hand clothes market in Sulaimaniyah in the semi-autonomous region of Iraqi Kurdistan.

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Iraqi Kurdistan Second Hand Market 3
Sulaimaniyah, Iraq
By Jacob Russell
01 Feb 2014

Men look at shoes for sale in the second hand clothes market in Sulaimaniyah in the semi-autonomous region of Iraqi Kurdistan.

Sulaimaniyah, alongside other cities in Iraq, has a large second hand market inside the Bazaar. Clothes, furniture and electronics can all be found in separate areas of the market. The clothes are usually donated in Europe, North America and Korea, and sold on through a series of intermediary companies until they reach markets in the developing world. Donors are often unaware that their donations are being traded for profit rather than going to charity. The second hand clothes market provides a popular alternative to the cheap and badly made Chinese and Turkish imports that fill the malls in Kurdistan. Shoppers can usually find anything from ragged t-shirts to high quality branded shoes and jackets. Prices vary according to quality and the trader but typically a t-shirt will cost around $3 and a jacket $10-$20.

Traders in Sulaimaniyah second-hand market buy clothes by the kilo for prices ranging from $1.50 per kilo for unsorted bales to $5 per kilo for a bale of sorted items. Prices in the bazaar vary according to quality and the trader but typically a t-shirt will cost around $3 and a jacket $10-$20.

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Iraqi Kurdistan Second Hand Market
Sulaimaniyah, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Jacob Russell
01 Feb 2014

Sulaimaniyah, alongside other cities in Iraq, has a large second hand market inside the Bazaar. Clothes, furniture and electronics can all be found in separate areas of the market. The clothes are usually donated in Europe, North America and Korea, and sold on through a series of intermediary companies until they reach markets in the developing world. Donors are often unaware that their donations are being traded for profit rather than going to charity.

Traders in Sulaimaniyah second-hand market buy clothes by the kilo for prices ranging from $1.50 per kilo for unsorted bales to $5 per kilo for a bale of sorted items. Prices in the bazaar vary according to quality and the trader but typically a t-shirt will cost around $3 and a jacket $10-$20.