Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

In the lagoon, between "Petite-Terre" and "Grande-Terre".

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Ismane, 17, Adballah's friend, grew up without his parents in the Kawéni slum. In an attempt to trick his solitude, he picked up a dozen stray dogs.

Ismane, 17 ans, ami d'Abdallah, a grandi sans ses parents dans le bidonville de Kawéni. Pour tromper sa solitude, il a recueilli une dizaine de chiens errants. ©Adrien MATTON

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Saindou, 16, French of Comorian origin, is a friend of Djof’s and lives as well in a Banga, a makeshift shelter made of sheets.

Saïndou, 16 ans, français d’origine comorienne et ami de Djof vit lui aussi dans un "banga", un abri de fortune fabriqué avec de la tôle. ©Adrien MATTON

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Abdallah is playing football on a construction site, away from the slum.

Abdallah joue au foot sur un terrain en construction, loin du bidonville.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Abdallah regularly goes to a friend’s place to sleep in a "Banga", a makeshift shelter.

Abdallah se rend régulièrement chez un ami pour dormir dans un "Banga", un abri de fortune, qu’ils partagent souvent à plusieurs.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

When they have the means, Abdallah and his friends get drunk on cheap wine.

Quand ils en ont les moyens, Abdallah et ses copains se saoulent de mauvais vin.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

After a fire in the Kawéni slum.

Après un incendie dans le bidonville de Kawéni.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Kayoum, 16, French of Comorian origin, lives in the Kawéni slum. He’s Djof’s best friend.

Kayoum, 16 ans, Français d'origine Comorienne, vie dans le bidonville de Kawéni. Il est le meilleur ami de Djof.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Abdallah has to leave his shantytown in order to find water for a shower.

Pour se laver, Abdallah doit quitter le bidonville afin de bénéficier d'eau pour se laver.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Djof, 17 (center). He arrived to Mayotte at the age of 10 after leaving the Comoros Islands, his native country, after an accident. He lives ever since in the Kawéni slum, without his parents.

Djof (au centre) a 17 ans. Il est arrivé à Mayotte à l'âge de 10 ans après avoir quitté les Comores, son pays d'origine, suite à un accident. Il vit depuis sans ses parents dans le bidonville de Kawéni.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Abdallah, 17 (center). He was born in Mayotte to a Comorian mother who’s an illegal immigrant. She was sent back when Abdallah was barely 10 years old. He lives alone ever since in the Kawéni slum.

Abdallah (au centre) a 17 ans. Il est né à Mayotte d'une mère Comorienne en situation irrégulière. Elle a été expulsée alors qu'il avait à peine 10 ans. Il vit depuis, seul, dans le bidonville de Kawéni.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Upon his arrival to Mayotte, Djof found shelter at a cousin’s place. He still goes back for consultation and to acquire his administrative documents.

A son arrivée à Mayotte, Djof a été hébergé chez une cousine. Il s’y rend encore pour consulter ou récupérer ses documents administratifs.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

In the Kawéni slum, Djof and his friends are preparing the traditional "voulé", Mahorese (Mahorais) barbecue.

Djof et ses amis préparent le traditionnel "voulé", barbecue mahorais, dans le bidonville de Kawéni.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Djof uses a hardly sterilized needle and Chinese ink to tattoo his friends.

Une aiguille à peine stérilisée et de l’encre de Chine servent à Djof pour tatouer ses amis.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Djof (left), a 17-year old "unaccompanied minor of Comorian origin, lives in the Kaweni slum.

Djof (à gauche), 17, un mineur non accompagné d’origine Comorienne, vit dans le bidonville de Kawéni.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

To escape from the vices of the slum, the boys take a trip to the malavoune – the country side in Mahorese (Mahorais).

Pour sortir de l’étau du bidonville les jeunes font une virée à la malavoune , la « campagne » en langue mahoraise.

Thumb sm
Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Dzaoudzi airport, rocked at 8000 kilometers from mainland France, by the still waters of its lagoon, the Mayotte Island in the Indian Ocean is the smallest and most recent of French overseas territories.

Aéroport Dzaoudzi, bercée à 8000 kilomètres de la France métropolitaine par les eaux paisibles de son lagon, l'île de Mayotte dans l'Océan Indien, est le plus petit des départements français avec une surface de 375 kms carrés.

Thumb sm
MAYOTTE, THE DARK SIDE OF THE LAGOON
Mayotte Island
By U.S. Editor
16 May 2013

Behind Mayotte’s tropical paradise image lies a precarious social situation rife with slums and poverty. This island, an overseas department of France located in the northern Mozambique Channel, suffers from problems such as a chaotic migration policy, a saturated education system, and poor health care. It is also a destination for illegal immigrants from nearby Comoros. These illegal immigrants face grave danger in their journey to Mayotte in search of a better life. Once they are in the country, they often settle in the slums.

One shantytown in particular — located in the Kawéni commune — has become known to many as the “largest slum in France.” It’s a sea of undulating shacks with an exceptionally high youth population. Most of the inhabitants are from Comoros, though there are also Congolese and Rwandans as well. Youth come to the country with family, and alone – as was the case for Comorians Djof and Abdallah. For them, the hope of a promised land is nothing but a long gone memory. All they have found is an indefinite waiting game for jobs, shelter, and naturalization.

Additional information:

In a referendum on the island of Mayotte, located in the Indian Ocean, 95.2% of the population voted in favor of becoming an overseas territory of France. Shortly after, on the 31st of March 2011, Mayotte officially became the 101st overseas territory of the French Republic. With 212,645 inhabitants living in an area of 376 km2, the island is the most densely populated of France’s overseas territories.

To Read Description in French Go To: http://transterramedia.com/media/18093

Thumb sm
Urban Poverty (3 of 4)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
15 May 2013

Boy collecting stuff from garbage.

Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Urban Poverty (1 of 4)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
15 May 2013

Roadside Barber Fayyaz shapes his customer's hair. Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Urban Poverty
Karachi, Pakistan
By U.S. Editor
14 May 2013

n Pakistan, a nation of 160 million people, 34% of its population lives below the poverty line. This estimate is much higher than the official government figure of 24%, but precious little seems to have been done to address the issue.

This problem is directly linked to the country tax structure, with the majority of the revenues going into coffers of federal and provincial government, forcing the local bodies dealing directly with the poverty to plead with these authorities for more money. The debate over this issue has been ongoing for years.

Thumb sm
Island of Twins (1 of 23)
Alabat Island, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
03 Feb 2013

Group photo of some twins on the island.

There are around 60 pairs of twins in a small town on Alabat Island. Eudosia and Antonia are the oldest twins living in the island turning 82 next year,w hile the five month-old babies, Jane and Joy, are the youngest twins on the island.
According to the mayor, the population of the island is composed of .4% of twins of the 12,039 residents of their town. When he and his wife migrated to the island in 1980s they were amazed that the island had so many twins. As a matter of fact, the former mayor of the island had a twin brother. Town folks are shocked when they think they've seen that the dead mayor is alive, but later learn that the former mayor has a twin brother.
No studies have been conducted on the island as to why the prevalence of twins in this small town is growing. According to a study conducted between 1996 to 2006, the Philippine Obstetric and Gynecologic Society found out that there was 182% increase in multiple pregnancies in 35 year-old women due to the use of fertility drugs. Due to the remoteness of the island and the limited access to fertility drugs, other influences could be considered such as inheritance of twinning or the food intake of mothers.
According to Wikipedia, Yoruba in South Africa has the highest rate of twinning in the world, with 45-50 twin sets (or 90-100 twins) per 1,000 live births, possibly because of high consumption of a specific type of yam containing a natural phytoestrogen which may stimulate the ovaries to release an egg from each side.
The main source of sustenance on the island is farming and fishing and according to the oldest midwife in the island, heredity is the major culprit of twinning in the island, and so far, their island has the highest population of twins in the entire Philippines.

Frame 0004
20th Anniversary of Babri Mosque Demo...
Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh, India
By newspoint
07 Dec 2012

The 20th anniversary of Babri mosque of Ayodhya. The 6th of December 1992 became a historical date in Indian history. After the demolishment of Babri masque in the Hindu’s spiritually city Ayodhya, a rift created between the two communities (Hindu & Muslim) Ayodhya was prohibited by the Government for a long time.
A superstructure called the Babri mosque standing in the city of Ayodhya, came crashing down. It remains even today a traumatic event for the nation, because modern Indians had not yet been weaned on a true history of India but on the Macaulayian version of the destruction of the structure as criminal vandalism.
However, the real act of vandalism was the superstructure built on a hoary and existing temple, and the vandals came from abroad to demolish the temple, and to build a mosque on the same spot. But temples, once it is shown that (prana prathista puj) wordhip was performed to build it, is where God or the deity resides, and therefore a temple belongs to God forever.
Babri mosque was built as an affront to the Hindus. Otherwise it could have been built anywhere else since namaz can be offered anywhere. Hindus can be proud to have prevailed in history because despite 800 years of Islamic and 200 years of Christian domination, Bharat today is still over 80 per cent of Hindus in population, and a continuing Hindu civilisation.

Byte-Hidu’s (Sant) Pious, Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh
“I don’t want to hurt anyone's feelings. We are doing these programs (Bhajan, Kirtan) merely for build Ram temple at Lord RAM birth place in Ayodhya. The Babri Mosque demolition is not good for Muslims but Babar was to attacker and he attacked both Hindu & Muslims. Place of prayer should not be on anyone name like (Babri mosque) BABRI MASJID.”

Byte- Eye witness, Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh
“I am connected with these cases since 1986. It seems that the Court will not sort out this issue.”

Byte- Eye witness, Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh
“The issue (Temple & Mosque) will not give a chance to Politicians. Whether it is Mulayam Singh Yadav (Leader of Samajwadi Party), Mayawati (Leader of Bahujan Samjwadi Party), Maneka Gandhi (Leader of Bhartiya Janta Party) or Sonia Gandhi (President of UPA). Now it should be stopped. If it continues, then there won’t be any development of Ayodhya”.

Byte-Hidu’s (Sant) Pious, Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh
“At that time we were scared looked at the chaos. But now, I felt that incident was caused by political parties. Now we had forgotten old quarrels and live with love both Hindu & Muslim.”

Byte – Resident, Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh
“ Ayodhya has not developed yet because nobody paid priority of Lord Ramachandra. I am a Muslim guy. I can proudly say that I am a resident of Ayoddhya but there did not any kind of development. People here live in amity. Political parties try to create rift again between two communities, they have failed.”

Local News Agency: News Point TV
Shooting Dateline: December 7th, 2012
Shooting Location: Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh (INDIA)
Publishing Time: December 7th, 2012
Length: 0:6:51
Video Size: 210.3 MB
Language: Hindi

Thumb sm
Embracing of dry toilets technology i...
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
By midakiarie
19 Nov 2012

1.1 billion people around the world defecate in the open, contaminating their environments and water sources besides spreading diseases like diarrhea, which kills 2,000 children less than 5 years old every day.

In Tanzania, only 10 per cent of her people have access to improved sanitation. Over 40 million of citizens in the Eastern Africa country do not have to improved sanitation.

6.5 million people in the country defecate in the open according to Unicef, causing illnesses related to poor hygiene that could have been avoided, and which costs the government millions of money that could otherwise be used for development.

NGOs are introducing dry toilets where modern sanitation facilities that require no water are built in homes and institutions with unreliable or no water supply.

Proponents of this project say the facility is a better option to many people in the world with many countries still facing water shortage problems.

Frame 0004
Egypt Muslims Commiserate With Copts ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
20 Mar 2012

Cairo, Egypt | March 19, 2012

Muslims in Egypt commiserate with Copts over the death of Pope Shenouda III, head of Egypt's Orthodox Church and the Spiritual leader of Copts in the country, offering them condolences and sharing them grief over the man considered by both as a great symbol of the country.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Hashem Mohamed, Muslim preacher:
"We would like to say that we're brothers. The Muslims and the Copts are brothers for better or worse. This is what we are urged by Islam Prophet Mohamed, peace and blessings be upon him, as he married Mariah who was Copt."

Pope Shenouda III is the 117th Patriarch of Egypt's Coptic Church and he died Saturday, March 17, at the age of 88 or almost 89.
Christians expressed appreciation of the condolences of Muslims and stressed keenness on maintaining love, mutual respect and national unity as the teachings of both religions.
SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Archbishop Silwan al-Zekri:
"Although there were few tensions and strives during his life, we have seen today love shown by Copts, Muslims, leaders and ordinary people. All currents of society agreed on one thing: that Pope Shenouda was a great person. So, this will surely reflect on the peace of Egypt in the future."

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Copt man:
"The Muslims brothers are as sad as the Christians. All Muslim leaders expressed sadness. The Muslims offer condolences to us on phone, in the streets, at the Church, etc. There are Muslims who are present at the Church just like Copts."

All top institutions offered condolence to the Copts of Egypt who represent 10% of the country's 80-million population while Muslims represent 90%.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 19, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: March 19, 2012
Length: 0:01:49
Video Size: 90.3 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

1- Various shots of Al-Azhar Mosque in Cairo
2- Medium shot, worshippers coming out of Al-Azhar Mosque after performing Muslim prayers
3- Various shots of Al-Azhar administrative headquarters in Cairo
4- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Hashem Mohamed, Muslim preacher:
"We would like to say that we're brothers. The Muslims and the Copts are brothers for better or worse. This is what we are urged by Islam Prophet Mohamed, peace and blessings be upon him, as he married Mariah who was Copt." 5- Zoom out, the Cathedral in Cairo with Copts outside waiting to bid the last farewell to the body of the Pope
6- Various shots of Pope Shenouda III seated upright on a chair inside a room in the Church with a golden crown and formal attire, and prayers are held around him
7- Pan left, Saint Mark Cathedral in Cairo
8- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Archbishop Silwan al-Zekri:
"Although there were few tensions and strives during his life, we have seen today love shown by Copts, Muslims, leaders and ordinary people. All currents of society agreed on one thing: that Pope Shenouda was a great person. So, this will surely reflect on the peace of Egypt in the future." 9- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Copt man:
"The Muslims brothers are as sad as the Christians. All Muslim leaders expressed sadness. The Muslims offer condolences to us on phone, in the streets, at the Church, etc. There are Muslims who are present at the Church just like Copts." 10- Pan right, Saint Mark Cathedral in Cairo
11- Tilt down, a mosque in Cairo

Frame 0004
The Last Village
Bohoniki, Poland
By Kirk Ellingham
01 Mar 2010

Muslim Tartars in Poland

Bohoniki is a peaceful little village not far from Sokolka in the east of Poland,it is the last Tartar village before Belarus; maybe also the last of its kind.
There is no doubt that few people would have heard about it be it not for one fact: it was in this area that, in 1679, thirty Tatar soldiers were granted land for their faithful service to the Polish King Jan III Sobieski. A Tatar lady, who takes care of the Mosque, does not fail to stress that it was a reward for their valour in battle. Other sources simply say that the King was in financial straits and presented the land to his Tatar soldiers in lieu of due pay.
There are now only three Tatar families living in Bohoniki, but, considering that the village does not comprise more than thirty houses altogether, they make up about a fifth of the local population. And it is their Mosque that makes the village famous and attracts visitors from all over Poland and abroad.
Eugenia Radkieicz is the Mosque caretaker and you catch her dashing across the empty street to the small wooden Mosque when a tour bus arrives to conduct her lecture on the history of Bohoniki for groups of Polish schoolchildren.

The few families that remain are mostly elderly or sick, Evelina's father is bedridden and suffers from a Liver complaint. She takes care of the animials now and her mother worries about her future, as she must take care of them both when she gets older.
Many of the other family members are alone with their children working in cities as far afield as London to Riad.
Mrs Koztowska's son is in Spain and her elder son just returned from London, she cares for her blind husband who was injured as a boy by a German shell during World War II.
The community is still strong, the Iman comes in from Bialystock once a week for friday prayers and they are trying to set up a Religouse School in nearby Sokolka.
The village is changing though,as the young leave for foreign cities the old are left behind, but they have survived for 400 years in Poland , so they will survive still, by struggling and adapting.
The large Muslim cementary on the wooded hill just outside the village is proof of their endurance and intergration; with its Slavanised surnames and Muslim Crescents.