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thailand lanterns 03
Chiang Mai
By Gloria Kurnik
31 Dec 2015

Wat Phan Tao Temple in Chiang Mai. At the stroke of midnight people release the floating lanterns into the air, and with them let go of their burdens and worries.

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thailand lanterns 02
Chiang Mai
By Gloria Kurnik
31 Dec 2015

Wat Phan Tao Temple in Chiang Mai. Buddhist monks release floating lanterns to welcome the New Year 2559 of the Buddhist calendar (2016).

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thailand lanterns 04
Chiang Mai
By Gloria Kurnik
31 Dec 2015

Wat Phan Tao Temple in Chiang Mai. Buddhist monk listens to the New Year's Eve sermon.

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thailand lanterns 05
Chiang Mai
By Gloria Kurnik
31 Dec 2015

Wat Phan Tao Temple in Chiang Mai. Monk listens to the New Year's Eve sermon.

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thailand lanterns 06
Chiang Mai
By Gloria Kurnik
31 Dec 2015

Wat Phan Tao Temple in Chiang Mai. Buddhist monks listen to the New Year's Eve sermon in English.

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thailand lanterns 07
Chiang Mai
By Gloria Kurnik
31 Dec 2015

Wat Phan Tao Temple in Chiang Mai. At the stroke of midnight young monks release the floating lanterns into the air, the wishes and blessings are written on the paper.

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thailand lanterns 09
Chiang Mai
By Gloria Kurnik
31 Dec 2015

Wat Phan Tao Temple in Chiang Mai. New Year's Eve. At the stroke of midnight a tourist blows the candle that she lit the floating lantern with.

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thailand lanterns 01
Chiang Mai
By Gloria Kurnik
30 Dec 2015

Wat Phan Tao Temple in Chiang Mai. Buddhist monks release floating lanterns to welcome the New Year 2559 of the Buddhist calendar (2016).

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thailand lanterns 08
Chiang Mai
By Gloria Kurnik
30 Dec 2015

Wat Phan Tao temple in Chiang Mai. Buddhists Monks meditate during the New Year's Eve sermon.

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Sousse Attack 02
Sousse, Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
26 Jun 2015

The scene after gunmen opened fire in a tourist resort in Sousse, Tunisia.

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Sousse Attack 03
Sousse, Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
26 Jun 2015

The scene after gunmen opened fire in a tourist resort in Sousse, Tunisia.

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Sousse Attack 04
Sousse, Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
26 Jun 2015

The scene after gunmen opened fire in a tourist resort in Sousse, Tunisia.

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Sousse Attack 05
Sousse, Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
26 Jun 2015

The scene after gunmen opened fire in a tourist resort in Sousse, Tunisia.

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Aftermath of Tunisia Shooting Attack
Port El Kantaoui
By Marwen Farhani
26 Jun 2015

THIS VIDEO CONTAINS SOME GRAPHIC IMAGES

Video recorded in the immediate hours following the attack on tourists by a lone gunman at the Hotel Riu Imperial Marhaba in the beach resort area of Port El Kantaoui, Tunisia on June 26, 2015

NOTE: Various portions of the video have no audio or distorted audio.

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Sousse Attack 07
Sousse, Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
26 Jun 2015

The scene after gunmen opened fire in a tourist resort in Sousse, Tunisia.

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Sousse Attack 11
Sousse, Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
26 Jun 2015

A gunmen lies dead on the pavement outside a tourist resort in Tunisia were he reportedly opened fire, killing 27.

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Sousse Attack 10
Sousse, Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
26 Jun 2015

A gunmen lies dead on the pavement outside a tourist resort in Tunisia were he reportedly opened fire, killing 27.

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Sousse Terrorist Attack Aftermath
Sousse, Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
26 Jun 2015

Footage of the aftermath of the terrorist attack in Sousse, Tunisia on June 26, 2015. Video shows B-roll and interviews with tourists, foreign embassies personnel and Tunisian officials. (English and French)

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Sousse Attack 06
Sousse, Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
25 Jun 2015

The scene after gunmen opened fire in a tourist resort in Sousse, Tunisia.

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Sousse Attack 08
Sousse, Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
25 Jun 2015

The scene after gunmen opened fire in a tourist resort in Sousse, Tunisia.

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Aftermath Of Tunisia Police Raid Agai...
Gafsa, Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
29 Mar 2015

The video shows the aftermath of the Tunisian security forces operation in the western city of Gafsa that killed nine militants, including the alleged leader of the attack on the Bardo Museum, in which 21 tourists and a Tunisian died.
Lokman Abu Sakhra, an Algerian national, was one of nine armed militants killed in the raid on Saturday. Authorities described him as one of Tunisia's "most dangerous terrorists". The names of the other eight militants killed in the raid as follows: the Haji brothers (formerly involved in an attack on the house of former Interior Minister Loutfi ben Jeddo), Zuhair ben al-Mawldi al-Thaybi, Khaled ben Faraj al-Souweisi, Alaa Eldin bin Kamel al-Tahiri, Maymoun al-Jaza2eri, and Naser al Ateri.
One another militant was wounded during the raid and was taken to hospital by the security forces.
Tunisian police says that the militants were members of the Okba Ibn Nafaa Brigade, a jihadist group that has previously carried out deadly attacks against security forces in the country.

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Tunisia Museum Attackers Lay Dead
Rue de Bayrouth,Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
18 Mar 2015

***DISCLAIMER: HIGHLY GRAPHIC IMAGES, LOW QUALITY IMAGES***

March 18, 2015

Tunis, Tunisia

Two of the gunmen responsible for the attack on the Bardo museum lay dead after being shot down by Tunisian security forces during a raid on the museum.

The attack on the Bardo museum killed 20 people and wounded 44, most of them foreign tourists. Two gunmen responsible for the shooting have been identified Yassine Laabidi and Hatem Khachnaoui. It is believed that other gunmen are still at large. 

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Tunisia: Bardo Museum Attack Aftermath
Rue Ibn El Baytar, Sidi Thabet,Tunisia
By Marwen Farhani
18 Mar 2015

March 18, 2015
Tunis, Tunisia

Police, Military, and emergency response teams scramble to rescue tourists and civilians who survived the attack on the Bardo National Museum in Tunis. Video includes shots of foreign tourists receiving medical treatment, foreign tourists boarding buses outside the museum, and general chaos as police and military secure the area.

Injured Tourist:

"No, no, I fell."

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Rock Climbing in Palestine
Ein Qinia
By Ibrahim Husseini
05 Dec 2014

Rock climbing is an emerging sport in the occupied Palestinian territories. Two American climbers with the help of an Italian climber are bolting rocks and teaching Palestinians how to rock climb.

The following footage was taken in Ein Qinia, near Ramallah, on Friday December 5, 2014.

This location was picked by Tim and Will for at least two important reasons. The first is because the rock is suitable for bolting and climbing and also makes a challenging climb. The second reason is the geographical location. The proximity of Ein Qinya village to Ramallah makes it unlikely for Israeli settlers to venture in. There are other climbing areas in the OPT but they are close to Israeli settlements and therefore are avoided by Palestinian climbers for fear of getting in trouble with the settlements guards and the Israeli army. Hundreds of Israeli checkpoints across the OPT makes movement a nightmare to Palestinians. Lack of outdoor recreation in Palestine makes climbing attractive to Palestinians and contribute to the overall quality of life for those who value outdoor activities.

More about Tim and Will (taken from the wadiclimbing.com website)

Timothy Bruns was a Political Science major and Arabic Language minor at Colorado College and is deeply interested in development in Palestine. Tim has been rock climbing for many years. He has extensive experience teaching hard skills, technique, and rope skills. He has built rock-climbing walls in the U.S. and is helping to construct an expansion at a local Colorado climbing gym. Tim is a certified lead climber and Wilderness First Responder. Additionally, he has spent past summers working with children and teenagers; leading wilderness trips in New Hampshire and North Carolina and working at a leadership camp with Palestinian youth in Maine.
Will Harris was a Colorado College Economics and Business major, Arabic Language minor and is an accomplished athlete. Will loves rock climbing and worked part time at a local Colorado rock climbing gym. He has devoted his academic career to business development in the Middle East and wrote his thesis on foreign direct investment in Jordan, where he spent four months living and studying.

1st Interview: Nour Awad. Palestinian climber.
2nd Interview: Timothy Bruns- Wadi Climbing Co-Founder
3rd Interview: Wael Hassouneh. Palestinian climber
4th Interview: Victor
5th Interview: Will Harris. Wadi Climbing Co- Founder
6th Interview: Dario Franchetti. Climber & adviser to Wadi Climbing. Italy. Works and lives in the OPT
7th Interview: Edmee Van Rijn. Climber. Holland.Works and lives in the OPT.

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Child Labor Tourism 01
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Viku Tupse is 9 years old. Among the trash, he found a broken face of Mickey Mouse. He knows that this will pull on the heartstrings of tourists and puts it on the head. He does not understand why tourists visit the garbage dump where he works, but he likes the candies that they give him. He has lived in the landfill for two years.

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Child Labor Tourism 02
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists is lead through the landfill in Siem Reap, Cambodia where many children work sorting trash.

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Child Labor Tourism 03
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Sau Srey Neang is 11 years old and has three brothers and one sister younger. She has gone over a half a year without hearing from her father, who went to work to Thailand. She knows that her family needs help, but she wants to continue studying to be a teacher. This is her first year working in the landfill.

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Child Labor Tourism 04
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists disturb children working in the garbage dump of Anlong Pi while the children are resting. The tourists, visiting this landfill as part of their package vacation to Cambodia, take pictures of the children with their cameras and phones. Their tour route offers a visit to the garbage dump where children work alongside adults in extreme poverty and dangerous conditions, allowing them to take pictures with the children. The landfill is located a few kilometers from Siem Reap, the most famous tourist destination in Cambodia, for the temples of Angkor.

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Child Labor Tourism 05
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Hael Kemra is 15 years old. In the future she wants to be an English teacher. She began working at the dump at 10 years old. Her mother took her to the garbage dump to earn money when her father abandoned them.

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Child Labor Tourism 06
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Children and their parents, all are landfill workers. They scavenge in the trash and look for recyclable materials inside the garbage dump with a metal hook attached to a wooden stick, walking behind a bulldozer. Tons of waste arrive daily to garbage dump of Anlong Pi from the tourist destination of Siem Reap. Largely for economic reasons, children are forced to work at the landfill by their parents. Some study in the mornings, and in the afternoons they will work at the landfill.

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Child Labor Tourism 07
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A Japanese tourist gets his picture taken with children working in the garbage dump by his hiking mates. Tourists take pictures and give candies to children. This group of Japanese tourist are medical students who have come to the dump Anlog Pi on their tour rote.

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Child Labor Tourism 08
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Lia Neang Syer is 14 years old. She began working in the garbage dumb at 10 years old. She could not continue studying, because she had no money to pay for books and extra lessons. She has two sisters and one younger brother, and her mother also works at the garbage dump. She does not like the job, but she is forced to work because her family needs the money to live. Behind her, other children look for plastic and metal to sell.

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Child Labor Tourism 09
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

The inhabitants of landfills burn some of the waste they receive because it is impossible to recycle all of it, and space is limited. Toxic gases are unbearable, and soil and groundwater are contaminated. Some locals fall sick due to the continuous intake of toxic gases.

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Child Labor Tourism 10
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A Japanese tourist covers her mouth with her hands because she can't bear the strong smell that this mountain of toxic waste and decaying food generates. She does this without putting down the iphone with which she takes pictures. Some children living and working in the landfill laugh at her.

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Child Labor Tourism 11
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Meas Chan, 10, looks for recyclable materials inside the garbage dump. Tons of waste arrive daily to garbage dump of Anlong Pi from the tourist destination of Siem Reap. He walks behind a bulldozer driven by his father, while his younger brother looks at him. About 50 under-aged children work in the garbage dump according to available data.

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Child Labor Tourism 12
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Suy Sokhon is 16 years old, and has gone two years without going to school. Her parents can not afford the costs of books and tuition. She has worked in the landfill from 12 years of age.

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Child Labor Tourism 13
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

While Sueun Chany, 12, carries large bags of trash from one side of the garbage dump to the other, a tourist waits to take pictures of children alongside their peers who have arrived by Tuk-Tuk. Foreign tourist visit the Anlong Pi garbage dump as part of their holiday in Cambodia.

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Child Labor Tourism 14
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump, most of whom have come with their families from different regions of the country to work.

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Child Labor Tourism 15
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists leave on the bus that brought them to the garbage dump of Anlong Pi. Children say goodbye to tourists, hoping to receive more sweets or some money. Tourists continue taking pictures as they say goodbye to the children and residents of the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 16
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of Japanese tourists take pictures of the landfill. Tourists are informed of these visits by word of mouth or directly with local tour guides in the hotels where they stay.

Families working in the landfill do not say anything about the tours. They are silent. The landfill is controlled by a private company that decides who works or does not work at the Anlong Pi, and the company benefits from these tours.