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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
16 Apr 2017

This photo essay documents the famous processions during the week before Easter, Holy Week, in Taranto. Since 1605, the devoted perform a traditional "pilgrimage" between the old and new city, visiting all the ancient curches in the city along the route. The two brotherhoods organizing the processions called: "le Perdune", "l'Addolorata," and "i Misteri".

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
14 Apr 2017

The statue of grieving Madonna during the pilgrimage in the Isola (old city). The exit of Madonna from Church of Saint Domenico is considered from the Tarantinians the main event of the Holy Week.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
14 Apr 2017

The statue of fallen Christ during the procession of "Misteri" the holy Friday.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
14 Apr 2017

One of the three "crociferi" who bring the cross on the shoulder during the pilgrimage of Madonna.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
14 Apr 2017

People bringing the statue of veiled Christ during the procession of "Misteri" the holy Friday, it's the last statue in procession during the holy week.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
14 Apr 2017

People bringing the statue of veiled Christ during the procession of "Misteri" the holy Friday.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
14 Apr 2017

The priors of the brotherood of the grieving Madonna before the "alzata" of the statue.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
14 Apr 2017

The pilgrimage of the statue of Grieving Madonna, the main event of the Holy week and the church of Saint Domenico, where the statue stands for the rest of the year.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
13 Apr 2017

The brotherhood of Saint Mary of Constantinople (born in 1580) in the old city during the march from Duomo (main church) to the Saint Josef church.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
13 Apr 2017

"le Perdune", devoted people who ask the forgiveness to Jesus, near the curch of Carmine, in Borgo (new city) where they start their penance. They walk with barefoot using the traditional walking called "nazzecate", swinging slowly.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
13 Apr 2017

"Le Perdune", devoted people who ask the forgiveness to Jesus, in the church of Duomo (main church) in the Isola (old city). They walk with barefoot using the traditional walking called "nazzecate", swinging slowly.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
13 Apr 2017

"Le Perdune", devoted people who ask the forgiveness to Jesus, in the church of Duomo (main church) in the Isola (old city). A couple of "perdune" is called "posta", at every altar a posta give the change to the previous for the prayer, the change of the "posta" is a rite with secret words whispered to the fellow of brotherhood.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
13 Apr 2017

"le Perdune", devoted people who ask the forgiveness to Jesus, in Borgo (new city). They walk with barefoot using the traditional walking called "nazzecate", swinging slowly.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
13 Apr 2017

The famous processions of the Holy Week in Taranto.
Since the 1605 the devoted doing the traditional "pilgrimage" in the old and new city, visiting all the ancient curches in the city.
Two brotherhoods organizing the processions called: "le Perdune", "l'Addolorata" and "i Misteri".

In photo: "le Perdune", devoted people who ask the forgiveness to Jesus, all'Isola (old city). They walk with barefoot using the traditional walking called "nazzecate", swinging slowly.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
13 Apr 2017

"le Perdune", devoted people who ask the forgiveness to Jesus, in Borgo (new city). They walk with barefoot using the traditional walking called "nazzecate", swinging slowly.

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Holy Week traditions in Taranto
Taranto, Italy
By Cosimo Attanasio
13 Apr 2017

"le Perdune", devoted people who ask the forgiveness to Jesus, going to the church of Duomo (main church) in the Isola (old city). They walk with barefoot using the traditional walking called "nazzecate", swinging slowly.

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A trip to Toraja, where death is a party
Rantepao, Indonesia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
12 May 2016

In the mountains of the south of Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, Toraja people celebrate the death of their relatives with old rituals. They keep the body of the dead person until the "tomate" (funeral). They consider the deceased to be "makula" (sick) and they bring food and drink and talk with the dead person. When the family decides to celebrate the funeral they kill nine  buffalos. (ARTICLE AVAILABLE IN ENGLISH, SPANISH AND FRENCH ON REQUEST).

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Dying Chinese Opera in Thailand
Ayutthaya, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
23 Mar 2016

Chinese opera in Thailand is a dying art. Opera companies performed for years in theaters, but the tradition is now under threat because of changing cultural habits and demographics. Nowadays these companies travel from village to village, bringing the tradition as a way to honor ancestors rather than to entertain the masses. Local Chinese temples raise the money to pay expenses.

Chinese opera became popular when Chinese migrated to Thailand in large numbers two hundred years ago. About 14 percent of Thailand’s population is ethnic Chinese. As older ethnic Chinese pass away, younger generations who have assimilated into Thai culture do not really continue the tradition. Further, just a small number of Thais of Chinese descent understand the dialect used by these opera singers.

Text: Ana Salvá

Fotos: Walter Astrada

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Dying Chinese Opera in Thailand 01
Ayutthaya, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
23 Mar 2016

One of the star performers applies makeup before going on stage. He is one of the few who continue to sing in Chinese dialect. Some of the company are ethnic Chinese, but others are rural Thais who were sold into the troupe when they were children. Picture by Walter Astrada.

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Dying Chinese Opera in Thailand 02
Ayutthaya, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
23 Mar 2016

An opera company member applies makeup before the performance. The child is the son of a couple of the performers who accompanies his parents in their nomadic life. Picture by Walter Astrada.

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Dying Chinese Opera in Thailand 03
Ayutthaya, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
23 Mar 2016

Chinese opera companies travel from one village to another in Thailand performing in local fairs and festivals. Picture by Walter Astrada.

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Dying Chinese Opera in Thailand 04
Ayutthaya, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
23 Mar 2016

A portrait of one of the performers. Picture by Walter Astrada.

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Dying Chinese Opera in Thailand 05
Ayutthaya, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
23 Mar 2016

Chinese opera company members ready for a performance. The actors and singers carry on the tradition as a way to honour ancestors rather than to entertain the masses

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Dying Chinese Opera in Thailand 06
Ayutthaya, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
23 Mar 2016

An audience member enjoys the performance of a Chinese opera near Ayuttaya, north of Bangkok. Picture by Walter Astrada.

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Dying Chinese Opera in Thailand 07
Ayutthaya, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
23 Mar 2016

Two children watch the performance of a Chinese opera near Ayuttaya, north of Bangkok. As time goes by Chinese opera performers see fewer new faces in the audience. Picture by Walter Astrada.

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Dying Chinese Opera in Thailand 08
Ayutthaya, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
23 Mar 2016

A member of the opera company applies makeup near the stage. Some of performers are sold into the troupe as children and raised in the company with little education. Picture by Walter Astrada.

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Dripping Gold: On the Hunt for Honey ...
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
05 Mar 2016

“This is my bank” says 53-year-old Agnes Cheptepkeny and motions towards her small tin house where two of the rooms from floor to ceiling are filled with bucketfuls of honey. “When I have money, I buy honey. This is how I save up. And when I need cash, I can sell a bucket or two” tells A. Cheptepkeny, whose one bucket of honey is worth around 80 Euros.

This woman lives in a town of Marigat, located in the Rift valley, Baringo County. This place is a home for people of Tugen, Ilchamus, and Pokot tribes which are known for their beekeeping and good quality honey. A. Cheptepkeny is from Tugen tribe and has been selling honey for quite some time.

Kenya is not very famous for its honey. Ethiopia and Tanzania are places where the biggest amount of this liquid gold is being collected. On the other hand, Kenya’s nature is the same as in the previously stated countries, so there is definitely a potential for successful beekeeping and honey export, although slow adaptation of new technologies, lack of knowledge, small interest of younger generations, parasites and pesticides used in agriculture, climate change, an unorganized market, and undeveloped infrastructure are the main issues that encumber this activity.

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Honey in Kenya 13
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) together with his wife is working as a shoemaker in Marigat town Kenya. When bee hives are full, he also goes to harvest honey and sell it to add to family's budget.

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Honey in Kenya 14
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) in her room, fully stacked with buckets of honey.

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Honey in Kenya 15
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) is calling a motorbike driver, to come to her house and help to take a bucket of honey to the market.

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Honey in Kenya 01
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) is firing up a bunch of sticks that he is later going to use to smoke the bees away from the beehive in Marigat, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 02
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) is harvesting the honey from his beehive hanging high up in the tree in Marigat, Kenya.

People produce honey for consumption, because it's high in energy. It is also used as sweetener and as a medicine. The honey and the beeswax is also sold to earn some extra money. In some places it is still used to pay dowries for the bride.

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Honey in Kenya 08
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) prepares to climb a tree with a bucket and fire to harvest honey in Marigat, Kenya.

"This year a lot of beehives are empty because of the draught," says Philip. He works as a shoemaker in the town, but also has a few beehives and harvests honey to add some money to the family budget.

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Honey in Kenya 03
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41), Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) and Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) are checking freshly harvested honey combs in Marigat, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 04
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) and Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) are walking around the trees and checking their beehives in Marigat, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 05
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) and her son are processing the honey in Marigat market, Kenya.

"This is my bank," says Agnes, pointing to honey buckets. Anytime she has cash, she buys honey, processes it and sells to make a living.

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Honey in Kenya 06
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Honey is processed in Marigat market, Kenya. Marigat is a fast-growing town located in the Rift Valley, Baringo County. This area is home to the Tugen, Njemps and Pokot communities, famous for their honey.

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Honey in Kenya 07
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) waits for customers by her honey kiosk in Marigat market, Kenya. Agnes makes her living from honey and even started a certification process. Once her product is tested and confirmed to meet quality standards, she can label her honey jars and start to distribute it to markets and export it to other countries.

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Honey in Kenya 09
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) is trying a freshly harvested honey, that Philip Kipyertor (41) and Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) brought to her in Marigat market, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 10
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53), Philip Kipyertor (41) and Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) taste a freshly harvested honey in Marigat market, Kenya.