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Médecins Sans Frontières
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
01 Oct 2013

Physical therapist work on Ahmed Kalif,  27 from Homs Syria who was with his family hiding in there home when the Syrian Army began airstikes and firing tanks into his neighborhood, his home crumbled around him and his wife and daughter leaving them exposed  he began moving his family across the street to another home when another burst of shells hit the street and shrapnel tore off his left leg. He was rounded up with other wounded civilians and smuggled into Jordan by the Free Syrian Army where he is still undergoing rehabilitation. He claims that if the Free Syrian Army was not there to defend us all of Homs would have been killed. Amman, Jordan.

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Médecins Sans Frontières
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
01 Oct 2013

Six year old Syrian girl is comforted by the hand of her father after being burned by a Syrian tank round that hit the house where her family was hiding in Homs. Her and her family were smuggled to the Jordanian border by the Free Syrian Army where she is now receiving reconstructive care from the MSF Hospital in Amman.

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Médecins Sans Frontières
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
01 Oct 2013

Abdul and his two children receive treatment for their wounds from a Syrian tanks that fired into their home while besieging the city of Homs in March, collapsing the ceiling on him and his family severely burning their bodies. Abdul and his family were escorted by the Free Syrian Army on a dangerous trek south to the border of Jordan to receive medical treatment.

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Médecins Sans Frontières
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
01 Oct 2013

A woman waits outside the room of a family members room who was wounded in Iraq by a car bomb who while he is undergoing surgery at the MSF Project Amman, Jordan.

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Médecins Sans Frontières
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
01 Oct 2013

Hussein 10 and father Abu Hussein. They were attending a funeral in Baghdad, Iraq when a car exploded severely burning Hussein  and wounding several others. Abu Hussein said there were 13 car bombs that day. Hussein is currently undergoing rehabilitation and a number of surgeries at the MSF Hospital in Amman, Jordan.

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Médecins Sans Frontières
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
01 Oct 2013

Zain Adeen 14, struggles to gain strength for rehabilitation after a vehicle exploded in Feburary, 2012 while he was walking to work at a neighborhood restaurant  where he sells hummus, the explosion resulted in losing his right foot and maiming his left leg. When asked how he feels about his situation Adeen said," It is not good but what can I do?"

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Médecins Sans Frontières
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
01 Oct 2013

Kasim Ali, a Syrian protestor shot by a sniper twice in the arm during a peaceful demonstration in Deraa, Ali was smuggled into Jordan by the Free Syrian Army to receive medical care, he has been in and out of complicated surgeries for 4 months and plans on returning to Syria to continue the struggle even if he is not fully recovered “There are no more protest in Syria anymore it is Free Army vs. Syrian Army,”Ali said.

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Médecins Sans Frontières Hospital Bra...
Amman Jordan
By Transterra Editor
01 Oct 2013

Tucked away from the loud and busy streets of Amman, Jordan is a place of healing where wars’ wounded hopeless have found a reason to believe in their future. A place where highly qualified volunteers from around the globe dedicate their time and talent to the future of complete strangers. These compassionate individuals belong to Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), or Doctors Without Borders, as it is also known. MSF is a secular non-governmental organization that believes all people have the right to medical care despite race, religion, or political affiliation, and that these peoples needs supersede respect for national borders.
The MSF reconstructive surgical clinic in Amman was created six years ago by a group of surgeons as a interim project for Iraqis with complex injuries untreatable in their country. The clinic run by Médecins Sans Frontières was set up on the second floor of a hospital owned by the Red Crescent. Since its opening in 2006, the clinic has treated over 2,000 victims of violence from Iraq, Gaza, Yemen, Libya and Syria. The surgical project has even added staff due to an influx of victims of increased violence from the surrounding region. In recent months, the clinic has seen a 40 percent rise in patients, 30 percent of which are Syrians. These wounded refugees from the north are able to find their way to the hospital by word-of-mouth. The proximity of the clinic to the Jordanian-Syrian border has made it well-known among the displaced Syrians whose injuries require highly specialized care. And though the ever-increasing number of injured Syrians have forced the MSF surgical project to expand their focus from reconstructive surgery to immediate surgical care, the clinic still plans to continue its same mission in adjoining their original three surgical specialties: maxillofacial, orthopedic and plastic.

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Samir Waiting on Syria
Mafraq
By Osie Greenway
07 Sep 2013

Syrian refugees arriving at the gates of Zaatari camp on foot from illegally crossing the Jordanian border escaping the fighting in their home town of Daraa, Syria. This is where Samir waits for his arriving family members. Many refugees are shot and killed while trying to flee by the Syrian army, on occasion the Jordanian army will fire back covering the refugees until they reach safety these clashes have left dead on both sides. Mafraq, Jordan.

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After Water Comes the Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Transterra Editor
06 Sep 2013

The Bedouins living in The West Bank are living hard and simple lives. It is a daily struggle to make ends meet. Living in tent camps and small desert towns, they try to create a life for their families.
In the desert outside Bethlehem, lies a little Bedouin village called Rashayida. Circa 250
Bedouin families from the same clan inhabit the village. If you go past the village and stay on the road it turns into nothing but a small path. That is where you meet the Bedouins that still inhabit the desert.
In the area around Rashayida, the Bedouins live a quiet, simple and hard life. It is a society that does not fit in anywhere else. Here life is centered around one thing: Survival.

The lack of water is one of the great challenges in the desert. They face serious issues like Climate change, the lack of infrastructure and the always-present conflict between Israelis and Palestinians.
Even though a Bedouin does not need a lot of water to survive, the issue is not just about
clean drinking water. They need water for their livestock, personal hygiene and cooking.
Just as it is important to have water for the few crops they grow.
The Bedouins are dependent on clean water, which they can get in the nearby village
and transport into the desert. A tank of water contains three cubic metres of water that
is 3000 litres. A Palestinian family on average spends 8 percent of its monthly expenses on buying water. A worldwide comparison shows an average of 3,5 percent. This number jumps upwards of 50 percent for those Palestinian families relying on tankered water like the Bedouins.
The Bedouins are some of the poorest people in the West Bank. Their primitive lifestyle means that they pay a lot of money for water. Still the quality they get is very poor, because the water in the tanks is stagnant.
Rainwater cisterns, that collect water, are scattered throughout the area. The Romans built them in ancient times, and when fixed they can be used for watering the animals. However, this option is not enough though, due to the lack of rain.

According to WHO, every human being should have access to around 100 liters of water daily. The average on The West Bank is 70 litres.
Israelis, Israeli settlers and Palestinians get mainly their water from two places: The Jordan River and the mountain aquifer that runs under Palestinian and Israeli land. Israel also gets water from the Sea of Galilee, which is the mouth of the Jordan River. Water has been rerouted away from the Jordan River since the sixties with devastating effect. An effort to change this has begun in 2013 even though some critics deem it not nearly enough to restore the levels of the river.
The Jordan River is off limits to Palestinians, because the Israeli military has deemed it military grounds. Jordan, Lebanon, Syria also taps water from the river. This massive use
has left the river all but dry. The Dead Sea has divided into two lakes, because of the low flow.
In the Oslo accords there is a section on water, which states that the water they share shall be further resolved when the Oslo accords are resumed. This has yet to happen.

Photos by Andreas Bro
Text by Andreas Bro

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Young People in Jordan Talk about Pea...
Amman, Jordan
By Amy Hybels
21 Jul 2013

Initial meetings in Washington are set to get underway nine days after U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced in Amman that an agreement had been reached that establishes a basis for resuming direct final status negotiations between the Palestinians and the Israelis.
Video Journalist Amy Hybels talked with young people living in Jordan, which has a large Palestinian population, following Kerry's initial announcement to find out how much hope they hold out for the resumption of peace talks.

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Youth in Jordan React to Possible Pea...
Amman, Jordan
By Amy Hybels
21 Jul 2013

First 24 seconds courtesy of Al Arabiya

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s announcement in Amman on Friday that an agreement has been reached that establishes a basis for resuming direct final status negotiations between the Palestinians and the Israelis made headlines in Jordan.

The US State Department spokesperson Jen Psaki on Tuesday said the elements are still being finalized and both parties are committed to resuming final status negotiations.

Amy Hybels talked with young people living in Jordan, which has a large Palestinian population, to find out how much hope they hold out for the possible resumption of peace talks.

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Samir Patiently Waiting on Syria
Mafraq, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
13 Jul 2013

A Quran is placed above the entrance of the tent that Samir prays in, he cannot walk without assistance to the mosque built by the NGOs so he has made this area his devotion area.

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Zaatari 4
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
05 Jun 2013

The "Hamza" fled Syria a couple of weeks ago, in spring 2013. They may have found safety in Zaatari, but only to encounter poor living and health conditions

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Zaatari
Zaatari, Jordan
By Transterra Editor
05 Jun 2013

Zaatari camp shelters more than 120 000 Syrian refugees. The families pile up in tents and "caravans" and survive thanks to international aid. Sickness spreads, water is scarce as the temperature rises up to 40 degrees during the day. To the daily difficulties add up psychological disorder and traumas.

Le camp de Zaatari accueille plus de 120 000 réfugiés syriens. Les familles s'entassent dans des tentes et des « caravanes », et survivent grâce à l'aide internationale. Les maladies se propagent, l'eau se fait de plus en plus rare alors que les températures atteignent 40 degrés dans la journée. Et à la dureté des conditions de vie s'ajoutent les traumatismes et l'épuisement psychologique.

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Zaatari 15
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
05 Jun 2013

A child being examined at Zaatari Médecins du Monde 's clinic.
Taken in june 2013

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Zaatari 14
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
05 Jun 2013

On Zaatari main street, a shop rents wedding dresses and sells beauty products

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Zaatari 12
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
05 Jun 2013

A child protects himself from the sun on Zaatari "Champs Elysées", the main street of the camp

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Zaatari 10
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
05 Jun 2013

A Jordanian doctor, working for the French NGO Médecins du Monde, welcomes dozens of patient per day, mainly women and children. They suffer from the dire living condition in the camp, and also from anxiety and stress.

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Zaatari 9
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
05 Jun 2013

A nurse gives health advices to Syrian women. He explains how to use a reydratation solution as many children suffer from diarrhea.

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Zaatari 13
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
04 Jun 2013

On Zaatari Champs Elysées, many shops have opened, giving the camp the look of a real city

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Zaatari 8
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
04 Jun 2013

A family gather under their tents. They recently fled their home near Deraa. They struggle against the poor health conditions in the camp.

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Zaatari 7
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
04 Jun 2013

A Syrian kid in Zaatari camp, waiting at Médecins du Monde clinics. Women and children form the majority of Zaatari 120 000 unhabitants

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Zaatari 6
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
04 Jun 2013

Children walk sometimes long distance to fetch water.
At Zaatari, water is scarce, and often dirty : many people are falling sick because of it. Tons of water is delivered every day. Jordan is a water-stressed country, and the important number of refugees could make the situation worsen

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Zaatari 5
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
04 Jun 2013

Water is a scarce ressource in the camp, despite the tons of it delivered every day. Very often, the water is barely drinkable, and the unhabitants have to walk a lot to fetch it.

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Zaatari 3
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
04 Jun 2013

The WFP is supplying refugees with basic food aid. Some are selling part of it to earn a bit of money. Stall like this one are common on Zaatari "Champs Elysées", the camp main street

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Zaatari 2
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
04 Jun 2013

The water holes are dissaminated in the camp, and some have to walk a lot to fetch it.

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LA Doctors Transforming Children's Li...
Amman, Jordan
By Amy Hybels
04 Jun 2013

A team of surgeons from Los Angeles, California flew to Jordan to perform 45 surgeries in just five days on children and young adults living with physical deformities. The trip was organized by the Children of War Foundation, a non-profit which provides access to donated surgical care to children living with physical deformities or injuries. Board member and celebrity doctor Andrew Ordon, a host of "The Doctors", joined the team which included highly specialized surgeons from Children's Hospital Los Angeles. As Amy Hybels reports, the team wasted no time consulting and operating with the doctors at the King Hussein Medical Center on some of their most difficult cases, transforming lives one operation at a time.

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A Zaatari, la misère de l'exil
Zaatari, Jordan
By Margaux Bergey
04 Jun 2013

reportage réalisé en juin 2013 dans le camp de Zaatari en Jordanie, et publié sur TV5 Monde .

Story about Zaatari refugees camp in Jordan, written in june 2013 and published on TV5 Monde's webstite

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The Second Crisis - Syrian Refugees i...
Mafraq, Jordan
By Richard Nield
30 Apr 2013

This film tells the story of the world’s worst refugee crisis from the perspective of impoverished local Jordanians in the town of Mafraq, northern Jordan, whose lives have been thrown into poverty and chaos by the influx of tens of thousands of Syrian refugees into their town.

More than 600,000 Syrian refugees have arrived in Jordan, a country of just 6.5 million. The focus of media attention has been on the 120,000 refugees at the Za’atari refugee camp in Northern Jordan. But the majority of refugees are seeking accommodation in Jordan’s towns, particularly those in the north of Jordan near the Syrian border.

Tens of thousands of refugees have arrived in Mafraq alone, doubling the population of the small town. Overwhelmed with refugees, many residents of Mafraq can no longer afford to support their families, and face eviction from their homes. Water and electricity are becoming increasingly scarce.

This film tells the story of these people. In moving interviews with impoverished local people in their Mafraq homes, they explain that they face eviction from their homes if they cannot meet demands for large rent increases from their landlords.

With Syrians arriving in Jordan every day, the situation is rapidly deteriorating. If the rate of arrivals continues, there will soon be one Syrian refugee for every family in Jordan. This film raises awareness of this tragic situation before it’s too late.
Interviewees:

Fatmeh Owaid (42) & Ali Suleiman Khaled (37)

Fatmeh and Ali, who have two children – one of whom is disabled – tell of how hard their life has become since the arrival of the Syrian refugees in their town. They face increased electricity and food costs, and difficulty in finding jobs, they are losing some of the support they had from local charities, and they have been threatened with eviction by their landlord if they cannot meet his demands to increase their rent.

Hanan Ahmed Jadaan (31)

Hanan, who has five children, one of whom has a disability, explains how she faces demands to increase her rent, and that she has been served with an eviction notice by her landlord. She was involved in a protest where local Jordanians set up their own camp to bring attention to their plight. Her husband, who also has a disability, is struggling to find any work.

Amal Awad Oden (32)

Amal, who has six children, one of whom has a disability, has been asked to more than double her rent payment. Her husband too has been unable to find a job.

Description of various shots in the video
• Various shots of: The Jordan-Syria border • Various shots of: The town of Mafraq and the road from Amman to Mafraq • Various shots of: Family homes in Mafraq • Various shots of: The city of Amman