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Dead Sea
Dead Sea
By Ralf Falbe
09 May 2015

Salty crust of the Dead Sea on the Israel-Jordan border. Due to climate change the Dead Sea is shrinking every year.

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Warrior Competition 2015
Amman
By Lindsey Leger
21 Apr 2015

April 21, 2015

Amman, Jordan

The seventh annual Warrior Competition held at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center (KASOTC) on the outskirts of Jordan’s capital, Amman. Elite counter-terror teams from around the world compete for five days from April 19th to the 23rd, in a show of sportsmanship in events with such names as “Top Gun,” and “3-Gun Gauntlet.” Soldiers run obstacle courses, scale walls, crawl beneath fences, then dash uphill to fire at moving targets in the distance.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

The reverberation from the desert canyon walls make it difficult to tell where the sound is coming from - but then, there is the harsh crack from the sniper’s rifle, soldiers sprint through city streets to storm a building, and a human-sized form is hauled out and loaded onto a truck. On a day like today, it’s normal to hear lieutenants shouting to their men in Arabic, Russian, English and Pashto. This isn’t a real war, but the scenes being played out could mimic a not-so-distant urban battlefield.

This is a staged scenario in a mock cityscape, part of the seventh annual Warrior Competition held at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center (KASOTC) on the outskirts of Jordan’s capital, Amman. 

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Warrior Competition 2015 05
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
21 Apr 2015

The Jordanian team rests in the shade of a sandstone cliff before the "urban assault" event at the Warrior Competition on April 21, 2015. In this event, soldiers must rush over a dirt verge, storm a building in a mock city, rescue a hostage and fire at targets in the distance.

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Warrior Competition 2015 07
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
21 Apr 2015

The Colombia team participates in the desert stress shoot event in the seventh annual Warrior Competition at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan, on April 21, 2015.

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Warrior Competition 2015 11
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
21 Apr 2015

The Jordan team participates in the Airbus seizure event, demonstrating how to execute a target onboard a passenger aircraft. The exercise was part of the seventh annual Warrior Competition at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan, on April 21, 2015.

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Warrior Competition 2015 14
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
21 Apr 2015

Commander Malik Al-Abbadi, leader of the Jordanian team, is photographed during the desert stress shoot at the seventh annual Warrior Competition at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan, on April 21, 2015.

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Warrior Competition 2015 17
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
21 Apr 2015

Brigadier General Aref Al-Zaben, the General Director for the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center, is photographed during the seventh annual Warrior Competition on April 21, 2015.

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Warrior Competition 2015 06
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
20 Apr 2015

The Lebanese Armed Forces gather their gear before heading to the next event in the Warrior Competition on April 20, 2015. The competition is held at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan.

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Warrior Competition 2015 08
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
20 Apr 2015

The all-women's Unit 30 SWAT Police team from Jordan competes in the three-gun gauntlet during the seventh annual Warrior Competition at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan, on April 20, 2015.

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Warrior Competition 2015 09
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
20 Apr 2015

The all-women's Unit 30 SWAT Police team from Jordan competes in the three-gun gauntlet during the seventh annual Warrior Competition at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan, on April 20, 2015.

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Warrior Competition 2015 10
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
20 Apr 2015

The Jordan team participates in the hostage rescue exercise at the seventh annual Warrior Competition at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan, on April 20, 2015.

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Warrior Competition 2015 13
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
20 Apr 2015

Soldiers wait for instructions atop a tower during the "Urban Assault" event on April 20, 2015, during the seventh annual Warrior Competition near Amman, Jordan. The center, which spans 25 acres of a blasted-out desert canyon, is a state-of-the-art training facility complete with mock cityscapes, villages, and grounded aircraft. The exercises are all performed with live ammunition.

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Warrior Competition 2015 18
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
20 Apr 2015

A member of the Jordanian team participates in the "3-Gun Gauntlet" event in the Warrior Competition on April 20, 2015 at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan. After running through a narrow concrete "gauntlet" soldiers must shoot targets with three different weapons, while being judged for speed and accuracy.

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Warrior Competition 2015 03
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
19 Apr 2015

A parachuter from Jordan 71st counter-terrorism battalion prepares to land during the opening ceremonies of the seventh annual Warrior Competition at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan on April 19, 2015.

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Warrior Competition 2015 04
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
19 Apr 2015

The Jordanian team prepares for the first event of the Warrior Competition, "Top Gun," in which soldiers must shoot at targets at varying distances with three different weapons, while being judged for speed and accuracy. Jordan and the U.S. were finalists, with Jordan ultimately coming in first place.

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Warrior Competition 2015 02
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
19 Apr 2015

Members of the American and Canadian teams cheer together and watch the remaining teams compete in the "Top Gun" event at the seventh annual Warrior Competition at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan on April 19, 2015. Jordan and the United States were finalists in the event, with Jordan ultimately coming in first place.

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Warrior Competition 2015 12
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
19 Apr 2015

The Palestinian team is photographed during the opening ceremonies of the seventh annual Warrior Competition on April 19, 2015 at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan.

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Warrior Competition 2015 15
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
19 Apr 2015

Teams from various countries relax together and cheer on their teammates during the first event of the Warrior Competition, "Top Gun." Elite counter-terrorism teams from around the world compete for the title of champion at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan.

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Warrior Competition 2015 16
King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center
By Lindsey Leger
19 Apr 2015

Members of the American and Canadian teams cheer together and watch the remaining teams compete in the "Top Gun" event at the seventh annual Warrior Competition at the King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center near Amman, Jordan on April 19, 2015. Jordan and the United States were finalists in the event, with Jordan ultimately coming in first place.

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SYRIANS SCRAPING BY IN JORDAN FOUR YE...
Amman
By Andrea DiCenzo
13 Mar 2015

SYRIANS SCRAPING BY IN JORDAN FOUR YEARS ON

LEAD-IN MATERIAL
As Syria’s civil war enters its fifth year, nine million people have been displaced, with 3.7 million of those having fled the country. Millions of Syrian refugees are scraping by in neighboring countries.

Jordan has registered 600,000 refugees – constituting almost 10% of the Hashemite Kingdom’s total population of 6.6 million, though the actual number may be much higher. One fifth now live in refugee camps, including Za'atari camp, the second largest in the world. It's illegal for them to leave Jordan's now overcrowded and increasingly insecure refugee camps, but many are now making the leap to urban areas, seeking work and a better life. Some Syrian families who fled to Jordan at the start of the war are fairing better than others who've arrived more recently. But they’re still struggling to survive beyond the camps, without enough allowance from the UN nor local charities to pay for food and medical care, or taking their chances with working illegally.

Despite not being legally entitled to work, many have taken up jobs at local shops at the discretion of Jordanian employers, while others are too afraid to leave their homes and are surviving on as little as 13 dinars ($18) per person per month from the UN.

UN REPORT
A recent UNHCR urban report, entitled ‘Living in the Shadows’ in January this year, based on 150,000 Syrian refugees living outside of Jordan’s camps, concluded that two thirds of the refugees now in urban areas are living below Jordan’s poverty line. 1/6 are living in abject poverty barely surviving off the equivalent of 1.3 dollars per person per day. The UN has expressed grave concern that refugees are now turning desperate measures to make ends meet, with children dropping out of school and even women turning to prostitution.

AMMAN
Husband and wife Diab & Shadia live in a tiny, squalid concrete apartment in the eastern Amman neighbourhood of Quesmeh. Their three-year-old son Zahare has an infection following what should have been a routine circumcision. And his father Diab is also unwell and desperately needs a doctor. But with a UN allowance and food stamps of less than 100 dinars per month between them they cannot afford to pay for three meals a day let alone a medical fee at the hospital.

Shadia takes us to meet the families of her brothers Khaled and Shadee in the east Amman neighbourhood of Abu Allenda. Khaled is married to 21-year old Heba, and they have a 1-year-old daughter Miriam who they say has been diagnosed with T.B., but again they cannot afford the fee for hospital treatment. Shadee and his wife Haneed have two children, which adds up to seven people living in their tiny, damp, one-floored concrete house.

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Syrians Scrape A Living in Jordan (3 ...
65,Jordan
By Camilla Schick
12 Mar 2015

LEAD-IN MATERIAL
As Syria’s civil war enters its fifth year, nine million people have been displaced, with 3.7 million of those having fled the country. Millions of Syrian refugees are scraping by in neighboring countries.

Jordan has registered 600,000 refugees – constituting almost 10% of the Hashemite Kingdom’s total population of 6.6 million, though the actual number may be much higher. One fifth now live in refugee camps, including Za'atari camp, the second largest in the world. It's illegal for them to leave Jordan's now overcrowded and increasingly insecure refugee camps, but many are now making the leap to urban areas, seeking work and a better life. Some Syrian families who fled to Jordan at the start of the war are fairing better than others who've arrived more recently. But they’re still struggling to survive beyond the camps, without enough allowance from the UN nor local charities to pay for food and medical care, or taking their chances with working illegally.

Despite not being legally entitled to work, many have taken up jobs at local shops at the discretion of Jordanian employers, while others are too afraid to leave their homes and are surviving on as little as 13 dinars ($18) per person per month from the UN.

UN REPORT
A recent UNHCR urban report, entitled ‘Living in the Shadows’ in January this year, based on 150,000 Syrian refugees living outside of Jordan’s camps, concluded that two thirds of the refugees now in urban areas are living below Jordan’s poverty line. 1/6 are living in abject poverty barely surviving off the equivalent of 1.3 dollars per person per day. The UN has expressed grave concern that refugees are now turning desperate measures to make ends meet, with children dropping out of school and even women turning to prostitution.

JORDAN VALLEY
Khatah is a father in a community of more than 35 Syrian refugees living in UNHCR provided tents in the Jordan Valley by the Israeli border. Some of them have been living like this for 2-3 years. Most are young children. They try to earn some money working irregular days on the farms nearby, but it's not nearly enough to cover medical fees, food, and other expenses. One woman is heavily pregnant with her baby due fifteen days ago, while other adults are suffering stress and chronic illness. Khatah explains he cannot afford to pay 40-50 dinars per ID card for his family of 19 people. He wishes the fighting would stop in Syria and that they would all be able to return to them homeland one day.

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Syrians Scrape a Living in Jordan (1 ...
Jarash
By Camilla Schick
12 Mar 2015

As Syria’s civil war enters its fifth year, nine million people have been displaced, with 3.7 million of those having fled the country. Millions of Syrian refugees are scraping by in neighboring countries.

Jordan has registered 600,000 refugees – constituting almost 10% of the Hashemite Kingdom’s total population of 6.6 million, though the actual number may be much higher. One fifth now live in refugee camps, including Za'atari camp, the second largest in the world. It's illegal for them to leave Jordan's now overcrowded and increasingly insecure refugee camps, but many are now making the leap to urban areas, seeking work and a better life. Some Syrian families who fled to Jordan at the start of the war are fairing better than others who've arrived more recently. But they’re still struggling to survive beyond the camps, without enough allowance from the UN nor local charities to pay for food and medical care, or taking their chances with working illegally.

Despite not being legally entitled to work, many have taken up jobs at local shops at the discretion of Jordanian employers, while others are too afraid to leave their homes and are surviving on as little as 13 dinars ($18) per person per month from the UN.

UN REPORT
A recent UNHCR urban report, entitled ‘Living in the Shadows’ in January this year, based on 150,000 Syrian refugees living outside of Jordan’s camps, concluded that two thirds of the refugees now in urban areas are living below Jordan’s poverty line. 1/6 are living in abject poverty barely surviving off the equivalent of 1.3 dollars per person per day. The UN has expressed grave concern that refugees are now turning desperate measures to make ends meet, with children dropping out of school and even women turning to prostitution.

STORY:
This is the ancient Jordanian city of Jerash, 50 kilometres north of the capital Amman. It’s now home to approximately 8,000 Syrian refugee families / 50,000 refugees.

34-year-old Ali and his younger brother Mohammed work shifts at a local coffee and tea shop. Living as refugees has put a huge strain on Ali's marriage, and he is now separated from his wife, and rarely gets to see his young son. He says they used to live in Al Midan, an affluent Sunni suburb of Syria’s capital Damascus. But when fighting between the Assad government forces and Syrian rebels began in their neighborhood, the family took the heart-wrenching decision to prepare to leave the country. Being the eldest, Ali headed to Jordan first to set things up for the rest of the family. Mohammed and his parents followed after.

The brothers live with their mother Yusra, who warmly invites us into their two-bedroom one-floor home. Yusra was recently widowed. Their father died of health complications shortly after joining them in Jordan. They know how terrible the living conditions are for those now living in Jordan’s over-crowded refugee camps. They tell us they consider themselves among the luckier refugees, who arrived in Jordan almost four years ago at the start of the conflict, having found work and a place to live.

Jordanian shop owner Khaled says he hired the brothers not only because Syrians will work for a lower wage, but also because he wants to help the refugees who are desperately seeking work. He says the Jordanian authorities are fairly lax when it comes to illegal refugee workers. He says all Arabs are brothers, and need to help Syrians until its safe enough for them to return home.

NOTES
We chose to focus the interview on the elder brother – Ali
Their mother, Yusra, did not want us to film her face

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A Biodiversity Odyssey (EN)
Worldwide
By Conteur d'images
06 Mar 2015

To celebrate the United Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011-2020, an environmentalist and a photojournalist visited 10 countries in 300 days in order to discover the most innovative solutions implemented by the peoples of the world to preserve the biodiversity of our planet. A fabulous educational journey through the Amazon, the Arabian desert, the Andes, the Pacific Ocean and more!

TEXTLESS, NATURAL SOUND VERSION / CONFORMED DIALOGUES AVAILABLE ON REQUEST.

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Angry Protests Against Jordanian Pilo...
Amman
By hamzaeqab
03 Feb 2015

Amman, Jordan

February 3, 2015

This video shows various scenes of protest against the execution of pilot Moath al-Kasasbeh. Demonstrators gathered inside and around the House of Karak Clans, an assembly that represents tribal groups of Kasasbeh's hometown in Amman.

The Jordanian pilot was burnt to death by ISIS after being held captive for several months.

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ISIS Interviews on Japanese Hostage A...
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
28 Jan 2015

Raqqa, Syria

January 28, 2015

ISIS fighters in Raqqa who come from various countries give their views on the Japanese hostage crisis.

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Jordanian Pilot’s Father Wants Son Tr...
Amman
By hamzaeqab
27 Jan 2015

Amman, Jordan
January 27, 2015

The father of Jordanian pilot Moath al-Kasasbeh, who is held by ISIS, demanded that the Jordanian government releases Sajida al-Rishawai, a woman affiliated with al-Qaeda who tried to commit a suicide attack in 2005, in a bid to facilitate his son’s release.

The father, Safi al-Kasasbeh, spoke during a sit-in organised by the Kasasbeh, Bani Sakhr, Abbadi and Tarawneh clans.

ISIS threatened to execute Moath Kasasbeh and Japanese hostage Kenji Goto if the Jordanian government did not release Rishawi.

Social media accounts affiliated with ISIS members have mentioned that Sajida al-Rishawi, who was imprisoned after failing to commit a suicide attack against a hotel in Amman, was given to Iraqi mediators from the influential Dulaimai clan in preparation of releasing her.
The Jordanian society is tribal. Clan leaders can usually pressure the government into fulfilling their demands.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Safi al-Kasasbeh, Father of Jordanian pilot held by ISIS

We ask the government very strongly and loudly, God willing this have effect on the ground… if Moath comes under any threat, we will hold the government responsible, from the top of the ruling pyramid downward. We will hold them responsible of whatever happens to Moath. This is a very difficult phase. I ask His Majesty the King, the armed forces and every official to start working as fast as possible to liberate Moath by setting free all the political prisoners in Jordan. They are demanding that Sajida al-Rishawi be set free; Sajida al-Rishawi is not worth Moath’s shoe. Why are we keeping Sajida al-Rishawi? She is a criminal who blew up a hotel while we are keeping her and paying her living expenses. Why would she not be released? Why would she not be exchanged? I demand the government to release Sajida al-Rishawi immediately.

From the first day… Moath has been detained for 36 days, and the government hid from us the actions it said it was taking. We found out that there were no actions of negotiations. We do not accept this. These times are very difficult and the government must act accordingly.
Unseen man: This process takes time. It cannot be done in five minutes.

We now have time. The government must send someone to let us know what they have done in order for to know our son’s fate. He is a military who was sent to carry out a military mission. We will hold responsible the people who sent Moath on this mission. Moath’s blood is very, very dear.
Unseen man: Did they not tell you about what is going on?
No they did not.

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Iraqi terrorist woman arrested in Jordan
Amman, Jordan
By AmmarParis
26 Jan 2015

Iraqi Sajeda Mubarak Atrous Al- Rishawi, arrested in Jordan

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Outspoken Jordanian Rape Survivor Exh...
Byblos
By Imad Masri
10 Jun 2014

June 10, 2014
Byblos, Lebanon

Outspoken Jordanian artist and rape survivor Manal Samir exhibits her art in Byblos, Lebanon. She cannot show her artwork in Jordan because of the social constraints and taboos that surround the issues of rape and mental illness. 34 year old Manal Samir was first raped by her close relative at the age of 4. The sexual abuse continued until she reached the age of 15 and was old enough to know it was wrong and speak out against it. She got married at the age of 27, but divorced after just 2 years. An art school graduate, she uses her artwork art work confronts her childhood trauma and failed marriage. Manal also suffers from Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

Transcript:

(01:07) “I want to say so many things, first of fall I want to say that this kind of damage is very painful and dangerous; nobody can imagine the repercussions of it. I could have hidden my face, and appeared only as a voice, but how many people have appeared only with a voice and their faces hidden? No I will appear with my face and voice, and speak out loud. This harm should stop, because this kind of harm burns the life of the person, it is a horrible thing for a child to be killed before they grow up, if you want to hurt a child, kill him, just do not let him live a sick fragile life and that is why I am trying to deliver that message” (01:58)

(02:41) “I am not only addressing the Arab world with my message, I am addressing it to the whole world, millions around the world are suffering from this difficult issue and they are living a very numb and confused life, I do not know how years are passing by to them” (03:04)

(03:38) “A person grows and gets blamed for being violent or harmful or wrong but in reality they are a victim” (03:50)

(04:30) “Beirut, I love it so much, we all know how much harm Beirut has suffered from, financially and emotionally, and all kinds of harm, till Prime Minister Rafik al-Hariri came and got Beirut up on its feet, and I consider myself, of course if you allow me and it is an honor to be a twin with Beirut, because I rise from the ashes, just as Beirut rises from the ashes, Manal also falls and always rises, and she likes to be similar to Beirut, and I wish you would accept me to be a twin of Beirut” (05:17)

(06:10) “This piece specifically is not like any other piece, it has nothing to do with the sexual harm, it is related to a damage that happened later on; this is a young beautiful girl who can grow up to be like all the other young girls, like my sisters, or anybody else but they destroyed her life in a different way, she almost hit puberty, she did not actually and look where she found herself, she is wearing something she does not even understand what it is, she is wearing shorts underneath, she truly does not understand anything, and when this young girl grows up she will become like this picture and she will suffer from enormous pain and her life will become ashes and broken glass, and we do not want that, please stop” (07:24)

(08:00) “My whole purpose is to find help everywhere just as I found help here in Beirut because I want to deliver my message to the furthest places on earth, and a little while ago I got someone telling me that a similar thing happened to them when they were a child and they thanked me for the encouragment, this is a small fragment of my dreams” (08:35)

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Syrians Vote in Jordan
Amman
By hamzaeqab
28 May 2014

May 28, 2014
Amman, Jordan

Syrians living in Jordan voted in the presidential election today at the Syrian Embassy in Amman.
The Syrian Presidential election will be held in Syria on June 3, 2014. It will be the first multi-candidate presidential election in Syria since the Assad family took power in 1971.

Interviews:

Tala:
I came to vote today to tell the whole world that we are all with the Syrian Arab army. We came here to vote for Dr. Bashar Al Assad. He is the only one capable of restoring peace in Syria. This election is one of the faces of the fight against terrorism.

Odai:
Today I voted in the Syrian presidential election because it is the right of every Syrian citizen. Of course there is democracy, you can choose the candidate you best qualified to take a presidential role in Syria.

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SOFEX - Trade Show for War
amman
By giulianocamarda
06 May 2014

362 international arms manufacturers and military personnel took part in the 10th Annual Special Operations Forces Exhibition (SOFEX) at the King Abdullah I Airbase near Amman in Jordan where they demonstrated their latest high-tech military industry equipment. High ranking military officers were present to buy and sell the latest weaponry. Aside from businessmen who attended the fair - one of the biggest in the world - to make good deals, many curious visitors came, mainly locals, excited to hold and point snipers and rifles, or to take a photo inside the cockpit of an helicopter. The exhibition began with a demonstration by the Jordanian Special Forces and the visit of the King of Jordan Abdullah II.

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SOFEX Special Forces Competition
amman
By giulianocamarda
04 May 2014

The sixth edition of the Annual Warrior Competition (AWC) was held in Amman, Jordan from April 30 to May 5. 37 teams of special forces from 19 countries competed against each other in a series of extreme combat-oriented events. The competition was held at the KASOTC (King Abdullah II Special Operations Training Center ). The 25 square kilometers military training center, which cost 200 millions dollars USD, is one of the best reality-based training in the world. The center offers all types of facilities, both for military training, and for hospitality and leisure, and has been designed to offer training courses for special forces, anti-terrorist units and law enforcement agencies around the world. The sixth edition of the Annual Warrior Competition was organized by the Anglo-American company MissionX (which specializes in events for extreme military). Special forces teams from Palestine, Lebanon, the United States, Canada, Netherlands, Slovakia, Russia, Afghanistan, and Pakistan took part in the event. The China Snow Leopard Unit of the Chinese People’s Armed Police Force won for the second time in a row. The members of the Snow Leopard team were selected from a group of 65.000 qualified cops and trained for 6 months specifically for this event.

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Jordanian Ambassador Kidnapped in Tri...
Tripoli
By Mohammad Salama
24 Apr 2014

15/04/2014

Tripoli, Libya

The Jordanian Foreign Ministry has confirmed that Jordan's ambassador in Libya was kidnapped on Tuesday morning in Tripoli.
Embassy sources said masked men wearing civilian clothes, driving a BMW and a pick up truck surrounded the ambassador's car and opened fire. They forced him into the car and drove off quickly. The ambassador's driver was shot in the leg and one of the guards was shot in the arm.
Royal Jordanian Airlines has canceled its Tuesday flight to Tripoli.

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The Second Crisis: The impact of the ...
Mafra, Jordan
By Richard Nield
09 Apr 2014

This short film reveals the untold story of the devastating impact that the Syrian refugee crisis is having on the most vulnerable people in Jordan.

It tells the story of the world’s worst refugee crisis from a unique perspective: that of the local Jordanians whose lives have been thrown into poverty and chaos by the influx of hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees into their towns and cities.

By the end of 2013, more than 600,000 Syrian refugees had arrived in Jordan, a country of just 6.5 million.

Their towns overwhelmed with refugees, many Jordanians can no longer afford to support their families, and face eviction from their homes. Water and electricity are becoming increasingly scarce.

In moving interviews with impoverished local people in the towns of Mafraq and Ramtha, I was told how rents are tripling, people face eviction from their homes, and tension and violence are growing.

With Syrians arriving in Jordan every day, the situation is rapidly deteriorating. If the rate of arrivals continues, by the end of the year, there will be one Syrian refugee for every family in Jordan.

This short film is the basis for a 20-30 minute documentary that is currently in post-production. This documentary is independently produced and I am looking for broadcast outlets for this piece.

If you are interested in purchasing either the short film or the documentary, please get in touch.

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Azraq camp 6
By hamzaeqab
25 Mar 2014

A new refugee camp for Syrian refugees opened its doors around April 30, 2014 in Jordan. It will host up to 130,000 inhabitants.

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Spotlight on Hope & Heartbreak: Child...
Syria
By Transterra Editor
03 Jan 2014

Selected 2013 images of the hope and heartbreak that Syrian children embody.

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Patiently Waiting for Syria in Zaatari
Jordan
By Transterra Editor
20 Nov 2013

Samir, father of eight, spent seven years in the Syrian Army only to be shot in the front of his home in front of his family for asking Syrian soldiers why they were questioning him. He is now living with the bullet lodged inches away from his spine making the left side of his body inactive. Samir, has lived with his family and relatives in the Zaatari Refugee Camp in Mafraq, Jordan for five months. He continues to wait for calls from other family members that are still caught between the fighting inside their hometown of Darra, Syria. The calls come at night and Samir sends family members to the gates of the camp to watch as newly arrived refugees by the hundreds sometimes thousands pour off the buses in hope of finding their loved ones. " I am hopeful to leave soon and see my wonderful country once again," he said as he passes his one year old daughter to his eldest daughter to feed and continued, " All I can do is hope and pray this will end soon,". I stayed with Samir and his family on and off throughout the course of four months documenting life inside Zaatari Refugee camp for Samir and his family.