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War Scars (22 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
06 Feb 2011

The main street of Rogatica, a small town in Republika Srpska, where still some people live as "Internally displaced persons" awaiting to return to their pre-war homes. As of June 2012, there were still 112,802 Internally displaced persons in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

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War Scars (23 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
06 Feb 2011

The lowland of Romanija in Srpska Republic in route between Sarajevo and the town of Rogatica.

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War Scars (18 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
13 Jul 2010

Mostar, the Ljubljanksa Banka building. This bank, located on the front line of Mostar, during the war was used as a snipers’ nest.

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War Scars (21 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
12 Jul 2010

An antique shop in the narrow streets of Mostar. All that remains of former Yugoslavia are a few portraits of President Tito, former uniforms and old books.

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War Scars (15 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jul 2010

Zivana Vasic, 53, with her husband Stojan, 62, live inside the run-down hotel Domavia, in Srebrenica. Stojan is almost completely paralyzed and can barely move his hands and face. "He has spinal problems, but his brain and heart are in perfect shape. “If receive the proper medical care, could run now," says Zivana. The Health Board provides free medical care, but the resources are limited and there are only few doctors who cannot guarantee home visits.

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War Scars (16 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jul 2010

Dusan Jovicic, 62, is a former Serbian soldier. During the war, a bomb destroyed his home in Vlasenica, killing his 13-year old son. His wife died of a heart attack three years ago. He lives inside the Hotel Domavia, a run-down hotel in Srebrenica, once used as a base for Bosnian Serb army, then by the United Nations. In 2010, there were about fifteen families, mostly elderly, in critical condition. The complex was purchased by a real estate group to renovate the structure into a hotel for tourists visiting the nearby hot springs of Mount Guber.

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War Scars (11 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
09 Jul 2010

A young boy lives with his grandmother in one of the German-made containers, TMG4, in the "Baratova" refugee camp on the outskirts of Srebrenica. Most of them live with little hope of improvement, as there is almost no chance of finding a job. Most of their homes were destroyed and the government has no funds to provide new homes for all refugees.

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War Scars (10 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
09 Jul 2010

Excavation of a mass grave in Slasenica, an area near Srebrenica. This area is located in a field that was used as a dump after the war. In order to find bone fragments, Matthew Vennemeyer, an anthropologist at the ICMP (International Commission on Missing Persons) and his collaborators have to dig through six feet of garbage

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War Scars (12 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
09 Jul 2010

The coffins containing the remains of victims of the Srebrenica massacre arrive to the memorial center in Potocari by trucks coming from Sarajevo.

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War Scars (13 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
09 Jul 2010

Family members mourn over their relatives' coffins in Potochari memorial center for the victims of Srebrenica's genocide. In 2010, more than 50,000 people attended the mass burial of 775 bodies in Potocari.

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War Scars (14 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
09 Jul 2010

People in Potocari assist while the coffins of the victims of the Srebrenica massacre are placed inside the hangar before the mass burial.

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War Scars (17 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
09 Jul 2010

The Hotel Domavia, a run-down hotel in Srebrenica, once used as a base for Bosnian Serb army and then by the United Nations. In 2010, there were about fifteen families, mostly elderly, in critical condition living there. The complex was purchased by a real estate group to renovate the structure turning it into a hotel for tourists visiting the nearby hot springs of Mount Guber.

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War Scars (8 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
08 Jul 2010

An ICMP technician works to reassemble body parts found in mass graves. By analyzing the DNA of the bones compared with the relatives of the victims, they are able to give an identity to the remains of the victims. Often parts of the same body are found in different mass graves hundreds of kilometers away from each other.

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War Scars (9 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
08 Jul 2010

The signs of mortar fire on a building hit during the war in the town of Olovo, on the road between Sarajevo and Srebrenica.

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War Scars (7 of 23)
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
08 Jul 2010

The International Commission on Missing Persons storage room in Tuzla, where the remains of victims are stored that have been found in mass graves. There are about 9,300 cases in mortal remains storage facilities in Bosnia and Herzegovina that are unidentified. These cases are currently known to represent the mortal remains of approximately 2,500 individuals, for which ICMP has a unique genetic profile obtained from a bone sample received from local authorities.

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War Scars in Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By Mais Istanbuli
06 Jul 2010

On November 21, 1995, the Dayton Agreement ended the civil war in what is now Bosnia and Herzegovina. 18 years later, the promises of the agreement have not been kept. Returning to a state of peace is slow and difficult in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the remnants of the war are evident everywhere.

War refugees live in containers or partially destroyed buildings. In 2012, UNHCR reported that around 112,802 people are still internally displaced.

Meanwhile, the ICMP (International Commission on Missing Persons) still works to identify those who are missing. According to the ICMP, at the end of the conflict in former Yugoslavia, 40,000 people were missing or presumed dead. So far, in Bosnia and Herzegovina, about 10,000 people are still missing.

The younger generation hopes that Bosnia and Herzegovina will join the European Union one day, but for many, peace and resolution still seem unattainable.

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Remembering Srebrenica
Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jan 2010

Mourners gather to mourn the victims of Srebrenica genocide at the Potocari memorial center during the burial ceremony.