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Iraq: Swiss Priest Cares for Christia...
Sulaimaniya, Iraq
By Nils Metzger
02 Apr 2015

In August 2014, the Islamic State captured a number of Iraqi Christian towns in the area surrounding Mosul, among them Karakosh, the largest Iraqi city with a Christian majority. Most of its 50,000 inhabitants fled within a couple of hours on August and left most of their belongings behind. Today, more than 100,000 of the already shrinking population of Iraqi Christians have become internally displaced persons (IDPs) or fled to other countries. While most of the IDPs have found refuge in Ankawa, the Christian quarter of Erbil and two large refugee camps near the city of Dohuk, a small monastery in Sulaimaniya opened its doors for more than 200 refugees who have now been living in this very crowded place for more than half a year. A single Swiss monk takes care of them.

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Iraqi Refugees Desperate for Healthcare
Diyala
By mushtaq mohammed
09 Dec 2014

November 9, 2014
Khanaqin, Diyala, Iraq

Refugees in the UNHCR camp, near the town of Khanaqin, are living in life threatening conditions. They were promised free check ups and treatment by the local government and NGOs but have so far received none. Forced to flee their homes in Mosul and other parts of the Nineveh province, after ISIS took over vast areas of northern Iraq, many of the refugees require urgent medical attention or suffer from incurable diseases. In desperation, some are using what little money they have for appointments with independent doctors who charge 1500 Iraqi Dinars ($1.30) just for a check up.

Transcription:

Um Majed, refugee, (Woman, Arabic):
(02:06-02:28) "I am a refugee from al-Saadeya, al-Asreya village. We fled five months ago. We were not offered any doctors or medication. I am sick and I have a slipped disc in my spinal chord. I cannot afford to go to a doctor. My husband had a stroke two years ago, we have to buy his medications for 4000-5000 Dinar ($3-4) a box and we cannot afford it. Nobody has came to check on us."

Mustafa, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:06-03:33) "I am a sick man, I suffer from five illnesses. I have had a heart attack and a stroke, I have diabetes, hight blood pressure and asthma. I suffer from so many diseases and we are here in the camp. We have no medication. My five year-old son has diabetes, it started six months ago, ever since the problems started."

Abdulqader, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:59-04:22) "If a doctor comes here, he charges 1500 Dinar ($1.30), We ask him to minimize the charge, he says that he has official receipts form the health directory of Diala. For chronic diseases he charges 1500 Dinar. How can people afford that? The doctor writes the prescription, and without providing any medications, he charges 1500 Dinar. None of the refugees have an income to afford that."

Abu Mohamed, refugee, (Man, Arabic): (04:44-04:56) "I have been running to help my daughter who is sick. I took her to the health care unit, and they have no medication. I spent over 40,000 Dinar ($35) on my sick daughters, all of them are sick."

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Syria: Surviving Winter in Latakia
Latakia
By Hashem
24 Nov 2014

Jabal al-Akrad, Latakia Province, Syria
November 20, 2014

Around 500 people live in a makeshift camp in Jabal al-Akrad, a hinterland area near the border with Turkey in the coastal Latakia province.
While these people are relatively safe from the fighting, they brace themselves to spend their second winter in poorly heated tents that can barely stand against the wind. Food is very scarce and there are no chances to make a decent living in this camp. To survive, the camp dwellers depend on food aid provided by residents of neighboring villages and a few humanitarian organizations.

Most of these refugees come from the neighboring Idlib province, but some have made the journey all the way from embattled Damascus suburbs of Western Ghouta.

Rebels control the Jabal al-Akrad area, while the rest of the Latakia province, home of the Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his influential Alawite community, is considered a stronghold of the Syrian regime.

Shot List
00:00 – 00:50
Several shots show refugees of different ages walking around the tents while hills could be seen in the background.
00:51- 01:06
Two medium shots show a group of people frying potatoes and making French fries sandwiches in the outdoors.
A man points at the frying pan, saying: “Film how people here are dying.”
01:07 - 01:18
Left pan movement shows firewood piled outside tents.
01:19 – 01:24
A wide shot shows a young girl standing outside a tent.
01: 25 - 01:29
A wide shot shows a toddler playing with a stick outside a tent.

01:30 – 02:21
Interview internally displaced person from Damascus suburbs of Western Ghouta (Woman, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

02:23 – 02:26
A wide shot shows a towable water tank.

02:27 – 02:31
A close-up shot shows water dripping from a towable water tank.

02:32 – 02:43
A medium shoot shows a woman and a young girl filling up water from a mobile water tank.

02:44 – 02:55
A medium shot shows a woman carrying water containers and a girl walking behind her.

02:56 – 03:06
A wide shot shows a man driving a tractor near tents.

03:07 – 03:10
A wide shot shows a man sitting behind a tractor’s steering wheel near tents.

03:11 – 03:23
A wide shot/ medium shot show children standing near a white car.

03:24 – 03:46
A wide shot shows people taking supplies from a car, while a man and a woman can be heard scourging a crying child.

03:47- 04:15
Interview with a woman who was displaced from Al-Rouj village in Idlib province (Woman, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

04:16 – 04:26
A wide shot shows a man standing next to a tent and moving a tarpaulin sheet.

04:27 – 04:38
A wide shot/ right pan movement show a woman carrying a water bucket.

04:39 – 04:51
A medium shot shows a woman cleaning seeds for cooking.

04:52 – 05:12
A wide shot shows a woman and a man fixing a tent. A voice can be heard telling the man that aid has arrived.

05:13- 05:26
A wide shot shows children playing around large bags that contain new tents. These tents will be set up to expand the camp.

05:27 – 05:36
A wide shot shows a child drinking from a towable water tank.

05:37 – 05:44
A medium shot shows smoke blowing out of a chimney pipe.

05:45 – 06:18
Interview with the camp supervisor Abdel Jabbar Khalil, a resident of a neighboring village (Man, Arabic)/ interview transcript below

06:19 – 06:26
A medium shot shows children walking between two tents.

06:27 – 06:34
A wide shot shows people walking into a tent.

06:35 – 06:58
A pan right movement shows a group of men sitting inside a tent.
A voice could be heard, saying: “Look at the tent. It could barely resist the wind.”

06:59 – 07:03
A medium shot shows a man inside the tent holding a cigarette.

07:04- 07:12
A medium shot shows two children standing at the tent’s entrance.

07:14 – 07:45
A pan left movement shows a man inside the tent playing an instrument called rababa made from an old violin.

07:46 – 13:35
Several shots show a man playing the rababa and singing a sad traditional song about a man who had to depart and leave his loved ones behind, while people sitting around him listen quietly.

Interviews

01:30 – 02:21
Interview internally displaced person from Damascus suburbs of Western Ghouta (Woman, Arabic)
“I am a Syrian refugee from the Damascus; from Western Ghouta. “We stayed in a nearby village. Warplanes used to drop their bombs near us and missiles fell at night. We could not stay at home at all, so we came to this camp. “The situation at the camp is bad. There is no firewood, and we need detergents. We need everything - currently there is nothing at the camp. “Our tents leak over us and we do not know how to manage. There is no bread or firewood. Our situation is pitiful.”

03:47 – 04:15
Interview with internally displaced person from Al-Rouj village in Idlib province (Woman, Arabic)

03:47 – 04:04
“We are refugees from Al-Rouj. Our homes and lands are gone. Our children starved and became homeless. God is our sole provider.
“We do not have food, milk, bread or diapers; we have absolutely nothing. “We are staying under the rain… our children are dying from the cold.”

04:05 – 04:15
“We are working in return for not more than100 or 200 liras [around $1 to $1.5] to provide for them [our children]. My husband has worked in cutting wood or similar jobs.”

05:45 – 06:18
Interview with the camp supervisor Abdel Jabbar Khalil, a resident of a neighboring village (Man, Arabic)
“This camp was set up to respond to urgent needs. We established it in this area that – God willing – we consider safe in order to cater for distressed people. “We provide water and some basic supplies for these people. There are 26 families who are very needy and live in a very bad situation, as you can see. “Tents are damaged during storms and rain. We brought in some tarpaulin sheets, but they are not enough.”

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Sample media
Fighting continues to displaced Afgha...
Kabul
By LK
04 Jul 2014

International combat troops may be preparing to withdraw from Afghanistan at the end of the year, but the escalating insurgency continues to drive Afghans from their homes. Helmand Province has been hit hardest by the Taliban insurgency, sending thousands of families fleeing to Kabul for safety. Some find shelter, but little else, at an IDP camp on the outskirts of Kabul. Lucy Kafanov reports. NOTE: THIS VIDEO IS NOT FOR SALE BUT FOR SAMPLE PURPOSES ONLY.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

Thumb sm
Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

Thumb sm
Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia's Internally Displaced Persons
Bogota, Colombia
By U.S. Editor
16 Mar 2013

With over 4 million Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries in the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s internal armed conflict. Seeking security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dance, they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds of the violence they have experienced.