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Asylum: Majd's Perilous Journey
Beirut
By Transterra Editor
19 Jun 2015

When we talk about the problems that face the world, we often discuss them in magnitude and numbers. We speak of millions displaced, hundreds of thousands dead, and many wounded.

However, what is often lost below the melee of statistics and news headlines are the stories of the individuals who endure these tragedies. Their personal experiences are what humanize all of the numbers and talking heads.

22-year-old Majd Bayoush was driven out of his hometown of Kafranbel, Syria by war. Desperate to start a new life abroad, he was smuggled to Europe via a long and dangerous underground railway.

He first travelled overland to Turkey, and then took a dangerously overloaded inflatable boat from Turkey to the Greek island of Samos. Once in Greece, he was registered with the Greek authorities and held in a migrant detention center.

After his release from the migrant detention center he began a perilous and exhausting overland journey from Greece to Germany. He trudged on foot over mountains and through forests in the bitter European cold.

Despite his tribulations, Majd was one of the lucky ones. He reached his destination of Hamburg…alive.

Majd’s story is just one of millions of stories about migrants risking their lives over sea and land to have a chance at a better life.

June 20th marks World Refugee Day. The commemoration is an opportunity to pause and consider that, with 50 million displaced people worldwide, today's refugee crisis is the biggest since World War 2.

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Global Refugee Crisis: The Worst Sinc...
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
11 Jun 2015

June 20 is World Refugee Day.

In 2014, global refugee numbers were higher than they have ever been since World War II. In 2015, the problem has only gotten worse.

There are currently over 50 million refugees in the world and more than %50 of them are children. Approximately half of the world's refugees are from just three countries: Afghanistan, Syria, and Somalia.

The response to this massive international crisis has been limited, with most refugee aid programs desperately underfunded. Amnesty International has called the lack of robust international response "A Conspiracy of Neglect." With little help on the way, the future of the world's displaced remains uncertain.

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Iraq: Swiss Priest Cares for Christia...
Sulaimaniya, Iraq
By Nils Metzger
02 Apr 2015

In August 2014, the Islamic State captured a number of Iraqi Christian towns in the area surrounding Mosul, among them Karakosh, the largest Iraqi city with a Christian majority. Most of its 50,000 inhabitants fled within a couple of hours on August and left most of their belongings behind. Today, more than 100,000 of the already shrinking population of Iraqi Christians have become internally displaced persons (IDPs) or fled to other countries. While most of the IDPs have found refuge in Ankawa, the Christian quarter of Erbil and two large refugee camps near the city of Dohuk, a small monastery in Sulaimaniya opened its doors for more than 200 refugees who have now been living in this very crowded place for more than half a year. A single Swiss monk takes care of them.

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Malawi Floods 01
Chikwawa, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
11 Jan 2015

Fields are flooded and covered in mud due to heavy rains and floods. The crop is lost.

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Malawi Floods 02
Chikwawa, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
11 Jan 2015

Fields are flooded and covered in mud due to heavy rains and floods. The crop is lost.

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Malawi Floods 03
Chikwawa, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
11 Jan 2015

Fields are flooded and covered in mud due to heavy rains and floods. The crop is lost.

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Malawi Floods 04
Chikwawa, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
11 Jan 2015

Buildings and homes have been severely damaged due to the onslaught of rain.

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Malawi Floods 05
Chikwawa, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
11 Jan 2015

Fields are flooded and covered in mud due to heavy rains and floods. The crop is lost.

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Malawi Floods 06
Chikwawa, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
11 Jan 2015

The Mediramu community evacuation centre was constructed by the Evangelical Association of Malawi and Chikhwawa District Council with support from Christian Aid and the European Commission. Bakabu Kavalo rests for a moment in the community evacuation centre. He is so old he forgot his age, but at Malawi's independence in 1964 he was a young man. The rains are heavier than any rains he has experienced in his life.

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Malawi Floods 07
Chikwawa, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
11 Jan 2015

The Mediramu community evacuation centre was constructed by the Evangelical Association of Malawi and Chikhwawa District Council with support from Christian Aid and the European Commission. Mrs. Chrissie Chimuhe is 52 years old. Her house was built on a hill, but it still collapsed. The rains were the worst she ever experienced. She has four children, two of whom are married. The other two live with her in the IDP centre; but at the moment the photo taken, they were in school.

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Iraqi Refugees Desperate for Healthcare
Diyala
By mushtaq mohammed
09 Dec 2014

November 9, 2014
Khanaqin, Diyala, Iraq

Refugees in the UNHCR camp, near the town of Khanaqin, are living in life threatening conditions. They were promised free check ups and treatment by the local government and NGOs but have so far received none. Forced to flee their homes in Mosul and other parts of the Nineveh province, after ISIS took over vast areas of northern Iraq, many of the refugees require urgent medical attention or suffer from incurable diseases. In desperation, some are using what little money they have for appointments with independent doctors who charge 1500 Iraqi Dinars ($1.30) just for a check up.

Transcription:

Um Majed, refugee, (Woman, Arabic):
(02:06-02:28) "I am a refugee from al-Saadeya, al-Asreya village. We fled five months ago. We were not offered any doctors or medication. I am sick and I have a slipped disc in my spinal chord. I cannot afford to go to a doctor. My husband had a stroke two years ago, we have to buy his medications for 4000-5000 Dinar ($3-4) a box and we cannot afford it. Nobody has came to check on us."

Mustafa, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:06-03:33) "I am a sick man, I suffer from five illnesses. I have had a heart attack and a stroke, I have diabetes, hight blood pressure and asthma. I suffer from so many diseases and we are here in the camp. We have no medication. My five year-old son has diabetes, it started six months ago, ever since the problems started."

Abdulqader, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:59-04:22) "If a doctor comes here, he charges 1500 Dinar ($1.30), We ask him to minimize the charge, he says that he has official receipts form the health directory of Diala. For chronic diseases he charges 1500 Dinar. How can people afford that? The doctor writes the prescription, and without providing any medications, he charges 1500 Dinar. None of the refugees have an income to afford that."

Abu Mohamed, refugee, (Man, Arabic): (04:44-04:56) "I have been running to help my daughter who is sick. I took her to the health care unit, and they have no medication. I spent over 40,000 Dinar ($35) on my sick daughters, all of them are sick."

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Securing the Sanctuary: YPG Fighters ...
Afrin
By Shirwan Qasim
04 Nov 2014

November 4, 2014
Afrin, Syria

While the Syrian-Kurdish cantons of Kobane and Qamishle remain under ISIS pressure and siege, the third Kurdish canton of Afrin is preparing to face any threats that may come its way and continue to be a refuge for minorities and other civilians fleeing ISIS, al-Nusra Front, and the Syrian Government. Part of these preparations involve the establishment of training camps for fighters from the Kurdish People's Protection Units, also known as the YPG. The commando training camp on the outskirts of Afrin is run by a woman named Busayna, who honed her military skills in the Qandil mountains of Iraq and now teaches them to the fighters of Afrin. Together with their male counterparts, the women of the YPG are now playing an integral part in securing one of the last safe Kurdish refuges in Syria.

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Tawerghans Face Challenges in IDP Cam...
Tawergha, Libya
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

In August 11th, 2011, habitants of Tawergha were forced to leave their town by Misrata rebel groups. They were accused of supporting Libyan forces of killed President Muammar Gaddafi during the two months long siege of Misrata.

Tawergha lies south of Misrata between this town and Gaddafi's stronghold town of Sirte. Gaddafi's forces used Tawergha as a base to besiege Misrata during the war, back in 2011.

Many of the around 30,000 inhabitants of Tawergha had to leave the town walking miles and miles through the desert and are now spread across the country. To this day, Tawergha remains a ghost town and it is reportedly being destroyed by militias of Misrata in order to prevent any future return of its inhabitants. The Libyan government is not able to guarantee safe return for the refugees, nor to protect the city.

In Libyan capital, Tripoli, there are up to four IDP camps for Tawerghans. The camp we visited, Tariq al Matar (Airport road) lies on the highway connecting the city and the airport in an old fabric. Access to the camp is through a dirt road of about 200 meters.

Tariq al Matar hosts around 300 families and a total of 1500 people. Most families use to live in a single room of about 3 x 3 meters. Residents say that water is not healthy, they do not have access to hot water and face attacks from militias for the simple fact of being from Tawergha. They say they are abused by Libyans outside the camp and have no protection from authorities.

A majority of city inhabitants are black-skinned, a rare fact in coastal Libya. This is due to the slavery origins of the habitants, which were once working on the palm trees.

TRANSCRIPT/LISTING OF SCENES:

1- Dirt road, only way to access the camp.

2-General view

3-Entrance to the camp. (Revolutioners of Tawergha can be read)

4- Mabrouk Mohammed, one of the coordinators of the camp

5- Mabrouk in the camp's office

6- He shows videos of the day Tawerghans were expelled from their town.

7- Another video

8- Mabrouk - "Misrata does not want us to return until there is a law that compensates them. They say that there are women who were raped by Tawergha. They want to investigate us and apply justice. They are asking the Libyan government not to allow us back until those guilty go to tribunals and are sentenced."

9- We are sure that some people (from Tawergha) did bad things. We are not all guilty for that. People from Tawergha have met with people from Misrata to solve the problem. We apologized to the families of Misrata. The meetings were good, but there is no answer from their side. They are waiting for the government to decide, but the government is not strong.

10- Street of the camp

11- Street

12-Street at the edge of the camp

13- Mabrouk explains the problems with the water

14- Housing unit for several families. Tawergha can be read.

15- Showers inside the unit. No Machines, no hot water

16- Toilets and water tank

17- Corridor. Each door, one family

18- One of the rooms. Up to 9 people in some of them

19- They received aid when they moved, but now, no.

20- Old man with an ill wife in their room

21- This family built a second room with a kitchen.

22- "The camp is not protected. Militias make problems for us. They killed people here. They arrested people here who did nothing. Militias come and say Tawergha, Tawergha! and take three or four people."

23- Clothes hanging to dry

24- Libyan flag

25- A family builds a new room

26- Kid carries concrete to his father

27- Mahmud: "We are building a room because the one we have is not enough for the whole family. We are seven and as you know we have young and old children, and we can't stay in a single room"

28- Mahmud working.

29- Inside the camp

30- Entrance to the mosque

31, 32, 33- Inside the mosque

34- Call for prayer

35- Man walks home after prayer.

36- Khamis Salem Ibrahim: "On October 12th, my sons were at home and a militia from Misrata came. They stormed the house and took three people. I don't know what happened with one of them, Salem is at home and Ibrahim is at the Wahda Institute."

37- Khamis in the camp.

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South Sudan in Crisis 15
Juba, South Sudan
By Samir Bol
14 Jan 2014

Internally displaced family from the peripheral areas of Juba, now residing in churches in the city in order to flee the conflict.

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South Sudan in Crisis 8
Juba, South Sudan
By Samir Bol
09 Jan 2014

Juba, South Sudan. Since the 15th of December 2013 when the conflict started in South Sudan, many of the residents of the peripheral areas in Juba fled their homes and resorted to churches. A family at the Kator Catholic Cathedral in Juba. According to the United nations more than 1,000 people were killed and 355 thousand people had been displaced in South Sudan since the outbreak of the conflict.

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South Sudan in Crisis 9
Juba, South Sudan
By Samir Bol
09 Jan 2014

Children of a internally displaced family from Juba.

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Lebanese for Syrians
Arsal, Lebanon
By Transterra Editor
21 Dec 2013

A small group of Lebanese citizens in Beirut organized a Facebook page to bring awareness to the refugee issues in Lebanon, Lebanese for Syrians. The page became an avenue for Lebanese to donate and volunteer to help with the desperate displaced people in their country. In only a week, the page allowed the civil campaign to raised over $40,000 in donations and implement their first medical aid mission with a volunteer medical team in both the town of Arsal and beyond the Lebanese military borders into “no-mans-land” where displaced Syrians are living in makeshift shelters.

The organizer, Carol Maalouf, was overwhelmed to witness the amount of Lebanese willing to help Syrian refugees. This help is necessary, as the refugees in Arsal are preparing for what is being predicted by many to be one of Lebanon’s worst winters in decades. Thousands of these displaced people live in terrible conditions in a barely habitable area that separates Lebanon from Syria, and is subject to aircraft missile strikes, mortar fire and sporadic border clashes from the Syrian conflict, being fought less then a mile away.

The majority of the refugees in Arsal and surrounding areas are from Qusair and Qulamoun. Both of these towns are major conflict areas with constant clashes between the Syrian Army and the Opposition. The situation for these people is dire and they are in need of medical aid, shelters, food and clothing. The area is mostly populated with women and children without any medical aid or supplies from NGOs that do not enter the region, but rather stop at the last check point of the Lebanese Army. The Lebanese for Syrians initiative is quickly growing in influence with the help of social media and will continue to help and bring awareness to the Lebanese people through their fellow citizens.

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Stateless 6
By vincenzo floramo
19 May 2013

Amida, 20, with her a week old daughter Rabia . She has been living at Baw Du Pha IDP camp since one year.

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Stateless 4
By vincenzo floramo
17 May 2013

A five days baby who have no name yet with her mother Amina Katu, 25. She arrived at Kawng Dok Ka IDP camp in Sittwe eight months ago.

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Stateless 5
By vincenzo floramo
17 May 2013

Lilia Begun, 20, arrived at Pauk Taw IDP camp in Sittwe eight months ago. She carrie her no named yet three days old daughter.

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Stateless 7
By vincenzo floramo
17 May 2013

Corima, 20, with her ten days old son Kalamie. She arrived at Baw Du Pha IDP camp in Sittwe one year ago.

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Stateless 3
By vincenzo floramo
16 May 2013

Jannu, 25, has been living at Baw Du Pha IDP camp Sittwe since one year. She just choose the name Mijurama for her 1 week old baby.

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Stateless 1
By vincenzo floramo
15 May 2013

One year old Rohingya baby boy Zarzamir Hussein with her grandmother Mouriam, 40 years old.
They arrived at Allah Son Internally Displaced Population camp six months ago.

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Stateless 11
By vincenzo floramo
15 May 2013

Arafa, 22 years old with her daughter Sattora, eleven months old. They where temporary relocated from the unofficial Pauk Taw IDP camp to Thet kay Pyin village school in Sittwe.

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Stateless 15
By vincenzo floramo
15 May 2013

Husam Banu, 28, with her 2 months old daughter Nur Kayas at Thet kay Pyin village school, Sittwe.

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Stateless 16
By vincenzo floramo
15 May 2013

Rohingya refugee Zora Hatu, 30, with her seven months old son Umar at the unofficial camp of Pauk Taw for internally displaced people at Manzee Junction near Sittwe Burma. She arrived at the camp five months ago.

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Stateless 2
By vincenzo floramo
15 May 2013

Tasmina, 10, with her 3 years old brother Abor at Thea Chaung II camp for internally displaced people near Sittwe. They have been living in the camp since five months.

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Stateless 10
By vincenzo floramo
14 May 2013

Ismael, a Rohingya new born boy is 11 days old. He is with his mother Mubarak Hatu, 30 years old, at Thet kay Pyin village school in Sittwe.

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Stateless 13
By vincenzo floramo
14 May 2013

Safaida, four month old, with her mother Taiufa, 20 years old. They arrived at Mezali camp for internally displaced people five months ago.

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Stateless 14
By vincenzo floramo
14 May 2013

Three months old boy Ruma Na Gy sit on the laps of his 8 years old sister Sham Shy Da at Pauk Taw unofficial camp for internally displaced people in Sittwe.
They have been living in the camp since eight months.

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Dead Cities 6
Syria, Idlib province
By Maciej Moskwa
17 Mar 2013

IDP's settlement in the ancient ruins. Living in these conditions can cause tuberculosis, rheumatism and leaves people exposed for Leishmaniasis.

Syria, Shensharah. March 18, 2013.

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Dead Cities 5
Syria, Idlib province
By Maciej Moskwa
17 Mar 2013

Temporary shelter for IDP. In windy, misty, and winter weather people suffer from the cold. Soon with the change of the season, sun, flies, and and lack of water will became the new curse.

Syria, Shensharah. March 17, 2013.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.

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Colombia’s Internally Displaced Perso...
Bogota, Colombia
By Natalia Margarita
17 Mar 2013

With over 4 million of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Colombia is among the top three countries of the world with the highest rates of internal displacement. Afro-descendants have been one of the communities most affected by Colombia’s inner armed conflict. Seeking for security, shelter and a way to make a living, over 7.000 afro-Colombians have arrived in Bogota’s neighborhood El Oasis. Through music and dancing they have found a way to deal with their problems and heal the wounds from violence.