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Honey in Kenya 13
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) together with his wife is working as a shoemaker in Marigat town Kenya. When bee hives are full, he also goes to harvest honey and sell it to add to family's budget.

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Honey in Kenya 14
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) in her room, fully stacked with buckets of honey.

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Honey in Kenya 15
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) is calling a motorbike driver, to come to her house and help to take a bucket of honey to the market.

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Honey in Kenya 01
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) is firing up a bunch of sticks that he is later going to use to smoke the bees away from the beehive in Marigat, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 02
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) is harvesting the honey from his beehive hanging high up in the tree in Marigat, Kenya.

People produce honey for consumption, because it's high in energy. It is also used as sweetener and as a medicine. The honey and the beeswax is also sold to earn some extra money. In some places it is still used to pay dowries for the bride.

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Honey in Kenya 08
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) prepares to climb a tree with a bucket and fire to harvest honey in Marigat, Kenya.

"This year a lot of beehives are empty because of the draught," says Philip. He works as a shoemaker in the town, but also has a few beehives and harvests honey to add some money to the family budget.

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Honey in Kenya 03
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41), Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) and Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) are checking freshly harvested honey combs in Marigat, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 04
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) and Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) are walking around the trees and checking their beehives in Marigat, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 05
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) and her son are processing the honey in Marigat market, Kenya.

"This is my bank," says Agnes, pointing to honey buckets. Anytime she has cash, she buys honey, processes it and sells to make a living.

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Honey in Kenya 06
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Honey is processed in Marigat market, Kenya. Marigat is a fast-growing town located in the Rift Valley, Baringo County. This area is home to the Tugen, Njemps and Pokot communities, famous for their honey.

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Honey in Kenya 07
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) waits for customers by her honey kiosk in Marigat market, Kenya. Agnes makes her living from honey and even started a certification process. Once her product is tested and confirmed to meet quality standards, she can label her honey jars and start to distribute it to markets and export it to other countries.

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Honey in Kenya 09
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) is trying a freshly harvested honey, that Philip Kipyertor (41) and Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) brought to her in Marigat market, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 10
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53), Philip Kipyertor (41) and Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) taste a freshly harvested honey in Marigat market, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 11
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Marigat town and market along the road, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 12
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

An old traditional log bee hive in the garden where Philip Kipyertor (41) and Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) go to harvest honey.

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Slovakia's Good Luck Fish Dish
Trnava
By danubestory
20 Dec 2014

In general, people in Slovakia are not used to eating fish, but around the winter holidays, Slovakians and other eastern Europeans enjoy a local specialty: fried horse-shoe shaped slices of carp served with a mayonnaise potato salad. The horse-shoe shape is viewed as a sign of good luck. The carp are bred in special ponds and then are distributed to specialist shops in all the towns and villages before the holidays. Many Slovakians keep the fish alive in their bath tubs before preparing the traditional meal.

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Lebanese Fisherman Battle Pollution a...
Sidon, Beirut, Lebanon
By David Shaw
30 Jun 2014

July, 2014
Lebanon

Lebanon's coastline has been a vital part of sustaining lives for thousands of years. However, in recent years, it has become unproductive as a means of subsistence due to privatization and pollution. Local fishermen of many different religions and backgrounds still attempt to scrape a living despite the depleted fish sources and pressure to move away by big business and government.

The Daliyeh, one of the last public spaces left in Beirut, contains the Daliyeh Marina, a small but fully working fishing port which provides a work base for an estimated 60-70 fisherman. The marina is under serious threat of permanent destruction due a hotel project that is due to be built on the Daliyeh rock. The project is funded by the Hariri family, one of the most economically and politically powerful families in Lebanon. The hotel would result in a significant loss to the fishermen and their families who have been working in this area their whole lives. The proposed project would also destroy one of the last places that the local Lebanese can use as a beach for leisure.

The loss of the marina isn't the only pressing issue that is affecting the livelihoods of these men and the families they support. Most of Lebanon's solid waste is deposited in landfills which border the coast, slowly leaking pollution into the ocean. Many fishermen admit that they sometimes purposely salvage large pieces of metal to sell as scrap. The sewers also deposit straight into the Mediterranean, usually completely untreated and containing industrial waste from factories.

Perhaps one of the biggest problems is overfishing. The use of illegal nets, which are used even during the spawning seasons, are having a devastating effect on the fish population, threatening to put many fisherman out of work. Each fishing community seems to have a different viewpoint on managing overfishing in Lebanon; any rules in place are not strictly enforced. Illegal fishing is a product of desperation due to the hardship these fishermen are facing as they continue to work in what appears to be a doomed profession. They often earn as little as $30 US Dollars a day which means that what they catch is often what they and their families eat. Many of the fishermen have no training or skills in any other potential occupation, so they will press on despite the many problems they face. “Fishing is all I know”, Says Hamzi Khalil, 63, “We fish, we eat. We don’t fish – we don’t eat.”

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Coral Triangle
Coral Triangle
By Mark_Esplin
10 Jun 2014

The Coral Triangle is one of the world’s most important natural resources. It is an area of ocean that covers 5.4 million km2, where more biodiversity can be found than anywhere else on Earth.

The 3,000+ species of fish, and vast coral reefs, provide livelihoods and food for an estimated 130 million people in the region. Millions more throughout the world also benefit from the bounty of natural resources, provided by the Coral Triangle.

But all is not well in paradise. Scientists, environmentalists, economists and governments, are increasingly worried for the future of this ecosystem. In the last forty years alone, the Coral Triangle has incurred substantial losses of 40% to its reefs and mangroves.

Projections suggest this rate of degradation is likely to continue, or increase into the future. With such significant numbers of people reliant on this natural resource, there is a potential catastrophe of global proportions waiting to happen.

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Living off the Lagoon 3
Nigeria
By Eniola Ilesanmi
25 Mar 2014

A girl paddles a canoe with water continers

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Tin Fever in Indonesia 33
By Steven Wassenaar
17 Mar 2014

Fondy (51 years) is a contracter working for PT Timah, his mine produces 60 tons of tin a month. He hopes to be able to produce 80-100 tons next year. The Pemali mine, the biggest legal mine in Bangka that has completely devastated the once green landscape. Operated by PT-Timah, it produces 60 tons of tin per month. Bangka Island (Indonesia) is devastated by illegal tin mines. The demand for tin has increased due to its use in smart phones and tablets.

Fondy (51 ans) est un sous-traitant, travaillant pour PT Timah, sa mine produit 60 tonnes d'étain par mois, il espère atteindre 80-100 tonnes l'année prochaine. Mine de Pemali, plus grande mine légale de Bangka. Exploité par PT-Timah. Elle produit 60 tonnes d'étain par mois. L'île de Bangka (Indonésie) est dévastée par des mines d'étain. La demande de l'étain a explosé à cause de son utilisation dans les smartphones et tablettes.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 21
Florida, Montevideo 11100, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
28 Jan 2014

Two men talk through a window at Bar Iberia in Montevideo. 50 years ago Russian and Polish sailors returning from fishing squid and sunfish in the South Atlantic popularized the bar, leaving behind their stories of the sea. Now "Iberia" remains a place where locals talk politics and football all the time, among them trade unionists, activists, workers and sailors. Wine, beer, empanadas and socialism.

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Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quie...
malawi
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Lake Malawi hosts 90% of the fresh water fish species of all the world in this single lake. Exporting them and tourism related with snorkeling is other of the activities, apart of fishing, that provide some jobs to the population.

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Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quie...
senga bay
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Deck over lake Malawi in Senga Bay. Most of the fresh water fishes in aqueriuns sold in pet shops in Europe and America came from this lake. It have more than 1000 different species of fishes ranking dozens of colours.

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Lake Malawi (2 of 19)
Lake Malawi, Africa
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Drying fish under the sun is the best way to keep it suitable to eat in a country where most of the households don´t have access to refrigerators or even electricity to keep the fish fresh.

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Lake Malawi (8 of 19)
Lake Malawi, Africa
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

In the waters of the lake, a collection of fresh water animals are fished out and sold worldwide for aquarium enthusiasts. Locals dive without oxygen up to 10 meters below the water surface to pick Cychlids fish with colors that range from deep blue, red, yellow or other colors. They are sold to some lodges that export them internationally.

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Lake Malawi (9 of 19)
Lake Malawi, Africa
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Chambo fish served with nsima (boiled maize) is the national dish in Malawi.

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Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quie...
malawi
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
04 Aug 2013

Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quiet waters

David Livingstone named it lake of the starts in 1867 after seen the spectacle of the lights that hundreds of traditional fishing boats use during the night to fish in its waters. Mozambicans and Tanzanians call it Lake Niassa, but internationally it’s called Lake Malawi. It’s the 9th biggest lake in the world, the 3rd in Africa, after Lake Tanganyika and Lake Vitoria, and the most southern lake in the great African rift valley.
Even before the independence of Tanzania and Malawi, there was already a dispute on its name and its borders, but now the probable oil reserves that the 700 meters deep of its waters reserves for millions of years bring a new fear in this part of Southern Africa – the specter of war to keep the sovereignty of the water and what lays in its bottom.

With an average dimension of 560km length per 75km width, more than 1000 species of cichlids fish and more species of fishes than any other body of fresh water in the world, Lake Malawi hosts borders between three countries; Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania. Between the first two, the water is divided by the middle and there are no questions of who manage which side. But between Tanzania and Malawi a crescent fight in words is taking place between both governments. That’s the reason why a committee from South Africa Development Community headed by the former South African President Tabo Mbheki and the former Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano are trying to solve amicably this dispute to keep the waters of Lake Malawi quiet as they always were.

The recent dispute, started two years ago when sounded that the lake could have big oil reserves and Malawi started allowing international firms to survey its bottom. Tanzania warned that half of the lake it´s from the country and recently, in July 2013, warned that if necessary its army is ready to guard and fight for the country territory. In the other side, Malawi, a poor country that never have seen war in its history, known as the Warm Heart of Africa and cited in various tourism guides as one of the peaceful and friendly countries in the world already said that don´t want war and it will take the case to the International Court of Justice to decide fairly who have reason.

Both countries guide themselves by the 1840 Heligoland Treaty signed by the victorious Great Britain over Tanganyika (the old name for Tanzania) from Germany. It was decided that all the water would be managed and part of Nyasaland which now is Malawi.
For the last 50 years, this fight has been cordial and peaceful once there was just water, fisherman in its canoes and wild life. But now, the oil industry and the perspectives of explore it, bringing income for one of the countries, makes this dispute increase the tone of the words changed between the two nations and worry the neighbor community.

Apart of this, fisherman all around the lake shores continues to live and survive in a simple way of life paddling their canoes and the cichlids fishes showing its colours above the waters of the lake.

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Shark finning: A Cruel Dish is Disapp...
Hong Kong
By maltekol
30 Jun 2013

The trade in Shark Fins has declined in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong is the world's shark fin capital, where about half of all fins are traded. But according to figures from the Hong Kong government imports last year of Shark fins dropped by a third.

For most Chinese, eating shark's fin still remains a status symbol. But as Malte Kollenberg reports young people are starting to view it differently.

This is how Shark fins are ‘harvested….
The fins are cut off a living shark and then the torso is thrown back into the ocean. Most of these fins from countries like Indonesia end up in Hong Kong.In 2008 around 10.000 tons of fins passed the city’s ports according to environmental organization Oceana.

INTV (English): Stanley Shea, Activist with French founded Bloom Association
“In Hong Kong in the old times they provided banquets which is all settled by the restaurant and the fin is always included in the banquet. So it leaves the customer, they actually have no choice to remove the dishes from the banquet set.”

But things started to change three years ago.
Under pressure from Environmental groups Governments in Hong Kong and Mainland China have stopped serving shark fins at official banquets. And big corporations as well as hotel chains are announcing they will take shark fin soup off their menus.

INTV (English): Stanley Shea, Activist with French founded Bloom Association
“We have been talking to corporate and also hotels and restaurants. And we found in Hong Kong now awareness has been increased and many hotels and restaurants now offer something alternative in the banquet menus so people can choose not to have it.”

According to the World Wildlife Fund, appetite for the fins and other shark-related products has led to some shark species falling in numbers by 60-70%.
But in March this year five more species of Shark were added to the Washington Convention, ensuring endangered species are not threatened by overfishing and trade.This means tradingof eightshark speciesis not possible without official documentation anymore.
Here is the Sheung Wan District …. Shark Fins are still openly being sold.

But small shops merchants say business lately is slow and they are reluctant to talk about shark fins on camera…it has become a sensitive topic.But not far away at restaurant Lin Heung Kui staff will still proudly tell you that shark fin soup is on the menu.

INTV(Cantonese): Unidentified employee in Restaurant
“We prepare and serve the fins in lots of ways - with a clear soup or with shredded chicken. It is definitely more popular at night. We offer an especially cheap deal at $88 at the moment, but sometimes people come to get more expensive dishes.”

Shark fin soup has been the food of the rich and wealthy for hundreds of years in China. Consumption of the fins is said to increase health.

But anthropologist Veronica Mak says generational change is taking place.

INTV (English): Veronica Mak, Anthropologist at the Chinese University of Hong Kong
“Not consuming shark fins becomes a signifier to show you are a social responsible person. In the past people made shark fins a signifier in a banquet, but nowadays this signifier changes.”

Activists believe that awareness and education is the key to change consumer behavior. And less demand for shark fins here will result in fewer sharks left for dead in the world’s oceans.

Video footage of fishermen "harvesting" fins is courtesy of Greenpeace. The footage was licensed from Greenpeace to be included into the video report.

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Le village de pêcheurs de Vanakbara
Diu, India
By Delphine Darmency
26 May 2013

Enclavée dans l’Etat du Gujarat, la presqu’île de Diu fait partie de l’un des sept territoires que compte l’Union indienne (en plus de ses 28 Etats) : celui de Daman et Diu, deux anciens comptoirs portugais. Adulée par les touristes indiens et étrangers grâce à ses plages et à sa quiétude, la presqu’île de Diu abrite également le petit port de pêche de Vanakbara à son extrémité ouest. Entre la réparation des filets de pêche et des bateaux, le triage et le séchage des poissons à même le sol, chacun s’affaire à la tâche.

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Le village de pêcheurs de Vanakbara
Diu, India
By Delphine Darmency
26 May 2013

Enclavée dans l’Etat du Gujarat, la presqu’île de Diu fait partie de l’un des sept territoires que compte l’Union indienne (en plus de ses 28 Etats) : celui de Daman et Diu, deux anciens comptoirs portugais. Adulée par les touristes indiens et étrangers grâce à ses plages et à sa quiétude, la presqu’île de Diu abrite également le petit port de pêche de Vanakbara à son extrémité ouest. Entre la réparation des filets de pêche et des bateaux, le triage et le séchage des poissons à même le sol, chacun s’affaire à la tâche.

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Le village de pêcheurs de Vanakbara
Diu, India
By Delphine Darmency
26 May 2013

Enclavée dans l’Etat du Gujarat, la presqu’île de Diu fait partie de l’un des sept territoires que compte l’Union indienne (en plus de ses 28 Etats) : celui de Daman et Diu, deux anciens comptoirs portugais. Adulée par les touristes indiens et étrangers grâce à ses plages et à sa quiétude, la presqu’île de Diu abrite également le petit port de pêche de Vanakbara à son extrémité ouest. Entre la réparation des filets de pêche et des bateaux, le triage et le séchage des poissons à même le sol, chacun s’affaire à la tâche.

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Le village de pêcheurs de Vanakbara
Diu, India
By Delphine Darmency
26 May 2013

Enclavée dans l’Etat du Gujarat, la presqu’île de Diu fait partie de l’un des sept territoires que compte l’Union indienne (en plus de ses 28 Etats) : celui de Daman et Diu, deux anciens comptoirs portugais. Adulée par les touristes indiens et étrangers grâce à ses plages et à sa quiétude, la presqu’île de Diu abrite également le petit port de pêche de Vanakbara à son extrémité ouest. Entre la réparation des filets de pêche et des bateaux, le triage et le séchage des poissons à même le sol, chacun s’affaire à la tâche.

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Le village de pêcheurs de Vanakbara
Diu, India
By Delphine Darmency
26 May 2013

Enclavée dans l’Etat du Gujarat, la presqu’île de Diu fait partie de l’un des sept territoires que compte l’Union indienne (en plus de ses 28 Etats) : celui de Daman et Diu, deux anciens comptoirs portugais. Adulée par les touristes indiens et étrangers grâce à ses plages et à sa quiétude, la presqu’île de Diu abrite également le petit port de pêche de Vanakbara à son extrémité ouest. Entre la réparation des filets de pêche et des bateaux, le triage et le séchage des poissons à même le sol, chacun s’affaire à la tâche.

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Le village de pêcheurs de Vanakbara
Diu, India
By Delphine Darmency
26 May 2013

Enclavée dans l’Etat du Gujarat, la presqu’île de Diu fait partie de l’un des sept territoires que compte l’Union indienne (en plus de ses 28 Etats) : celui de Daman et Diu, deux anciens comptoirs portugais. Adulée par les touristes indiens et étrangers grâce à ses plages et à sa quiétude, la presqu’île de Diu abrite également le petit port de pêche de Vanakbara à son extrémité ouest. Entre la réparation des filets de pêche et des bateaux, le triage et le séchage des poissons à même le sol, chacun s’affaire à la tâche.

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Le village de pêcheurs de Vanakbara
Diu, India
By Delphine Darmency
26 May 2013

Enclavée dans l’Etat du Gujarat, la presqu’île de Diu fait partie de l’un des sept territoires que compte l’Union indienne (en plus de ses 28 Etats) : celui de Daman et Diu, deux anciens comptoirs portugais. Adulée par les touristes indiens et étrangers grâce à ses plages et à sa quiétude, la presqu’île de Diu abrite également le petit port de pêche de Vanakbara à son extrémité ouest. Entre la réparation des filets de pêche et des bateaux, le triage et le séchage des poissons à même le sol, chacun s’affaire à la tâche.