Thumb sm
Eid Ul Adha Preparation in Karachi, P...
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
08 Aug 2019

Pakistanis are preparing to celebrate Eid ul Adha on August 12. "Everyone is busy nowadays preparing for Eid ul Adha, buying a good animal to sacrifice. Eid al-Adha. Feast of the Sacrifice, also called the "Festival of the Sacrifice", is the second of two Islamic holidays celebrated worldwide each year (the other being Eid al-Fitr), and considered the holier of the two. It honours the willingness of Ibrahim (Abraham) to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God's command.

Thumb unavailable
Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Transporter delivering services at its peak during the month of Eid ul Adha as Muslims purchasing sacrificial animals from the Animal Stock Market from the Outskirts of Metropolitan City, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Transporter delivering services at its peak during the month of Eid ul Adha as Muslims purchasing sacrificial animals from the Animal Stock Market from the Outskirts of Metropolitan City, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Boy sitting near sacrificial cow as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor cutting grass for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Children playing with their Sacrificial goat as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
05 Aug 2019

Young girl showing her affection with sacrificial goat as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder grabbing sack of grass for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor selling foddering goods and displaying jewelry for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor cutting grass for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Fodder vendor Weighting grass for customers as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Eid Ul Adha Preparation
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
04 Aug 2019

Customer purchasing Fodder for his sacrificial cow at makeshift Stall where vendor selling foddering goods and displaying jewelry for animals as Eid Ul Adha is up ahead and Muslims in Pakistan ready to celebrate their sacrifices, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Thumb sm
Central Asian Gypsy Circumcision Party
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
09 Mar 2015

Photos and Text by Timur Karpov/Transterra Media

The Mugat are an ancient nomadic people living in Central Asia. Also known as the "Central Asian Gypsies", their lifestyle is similar to European Roma: they live in camps, migrate across countries, and begand recycle garbage for money. Many people in Uzbekistsan, a country with a significant Mugat population, believe the Mugat have magic powers and know secret curses.

Usually the Mugat never let cameramen inside their community and are warey of outsiders. This Mugat ceremony, called "Khatna-tuy", took place in a small city of Parkent, Uzbekistan. Mugat people from camps around Parkent gathered together to celebrate the circumcision of one of the boys from the community. As an Islamic people, circumcision is one of the most important events in the life of a Mugat man. On the day of his ceremony, he receives money and gifts from community, while guests enjoy cheap vodka, bowls of meat, and dancing.

These photos provide an inside look at the rituals of one of the most secretive peoples in one of the world's most secretive states. 

Frame 0004
Souk El-Khan in Hasbaya, an Old Style...
Hasbaya, Lebanon
By [email protected]
28 Dec 2014

Hasbaya, Lebanon

December 29, 2014

Souk El-Khan is one of the oldest public markets in Lebanon. Located in between Hasbayya, Arkoub and Marjaayoun, it is attended by the merchants and citizens from the South and the Bekaa. Also, in previous times, in was used by the people of Houla in the South Galilee in Palestine; and Houran and the Golan in Syria for all kinds of dealing and trading. Some of the market’s most common goods were cattle, olives and local farming products like seeds, lemons and bananas. Moreover, the market was used as a pit stop for herds of bulls, camels and donkeys coming from Mount Amel, Safad and Houla regions towards the Bekaa and Syria.

The market was given its name after the great hotel built by Wali Abu Bakr al-Shihabi in 1350. The hotel was built with old stones, lime and white sand, and maintains its traditional feel until now. Every Tuesday, merchants spread their carpets under tents of cloth and display their goods on rocks, wooden boards, or in front of their animals and old cars.

Since 2005, the market has witnessed a series of modernization and sophistication. Through a cultural project funded by USAID along with the implementation of Mercy Corps, which completed a full integrated outline, the market became not only a commercial epicenter but also a station to various cultural, artistic and social activities, a space for recreation in times of holidays and festivals, and a popular destination in the various political events and festivals.

The market occupies more than 30,000 square meters. All along the Hasbani river’s west bank, popular stalls are spread, offering nuts, falafel, and grilled meats to attract the people’s attention. Also found are affordable goods brought by traders from Nabatieh, the South and the Bekaa Valley. Moreover, the market has, since 2006, become the intent of many UNIFIL forces.

Nowadays, the market is cut by a tight road for the cars, around which small shops are present and to its sides tents are mounted to handle the products. There are many alleys and side streets to the market. To the right of the road, between eucalyptus and cypress trees, products like clothes, dresses, carpets, shoes and home utensils are displayed. To the left of the road, all kinds of fruits, vegetables and sweets are displayed. To the south, we find a big market for meats and barbecue products. Also to the south, exists a big animal market used for trading cattle. Additionally, there is a section for plants: fruit trees, forest trees and various flowers. The noises, sounds, discussions and variety of local dialects show the market goer that social interaction plays a major role in the market.

Hasbayya has kept the market within its interest. It has therefore cooperated with foreign funding entities aimed at updating the market’s infrastructure, while preserving its old-fashioned traditions and feel. Consequently, the work was distributed over 8,000 square meters, in addition to the renovation of the Khan over four thousand square meters. The project included the construction of eighty shops roofed with tiles, surrounded with parking lots that fit up to two hundred and fifty cars. Distributed inside are green spaces that hold old trees. In addition, the project holds a slaughterhouse, bathrooms and a multi-purpose exhibition room built of concrete, with a meat market on its roof. This is the heritage of Souk El-Khan. Also, the project includes a public park equipped with seats and amusements for children with ongoing security under the municipality’s supervision.

Shot List

Wide shot of Marjaayoun area
Close up on the sign boards
Various shots of the traffic, the merchants, and the people in the area of the market
Various shots of cattle in the market
Various shots of butchers in the market and people eating meat.

SOUNDBITES

(01:11-02:08)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

Al-Khan market is the oldest vegetable market in Lebanon. A bit down from here, there used be a khan [a hotel], where people from many countries used to stay and sell their merchandise on camels and horses.
I am 70 years old now. I used to come here with my father to sell iron tools, for agriculture and so. Until this day, I still come here, I made a family, built a house, bought properties, and my pocket is full, thank God, all because of this market.

(02:32-03:08)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

Al-Khan market is located in the center of Marjaayoun area in Hasbayya, it dates from the ottoman times. It is a very ancient market, and as we said, the inhabitants of the area come here to sell their products – grains, cattle, grapes, figs, nuts and almonds, and vegetables.

(03:51-04:07)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

We have been coming here for 20 years. We have to come to the market to trade and sell.
Interviewer: What do you sell?
I sell cattle. I have a butcher shop and I sell cattle.

(04:36-05:06)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

It is a very old market, over 200 years old. Caravans used to arrive here carrying agricultural products, silk, and fabrics. There used to be a khan a bit down from here; it used to be a station for merchants and their cattle. There, they were able rest and then to continue their journey to the south.

(05:18-05:35)

(Arabic, Man) Unnamed

Now it is all about money, you buy something and you pay for it. Before, it used to be a trade system. People brought chickpeas, and took tomatoes in exchange for them, or exchange cabbage for bring tomatoes. Now, this does not take place anymore.

Frame 0004
Oleg the Hunter: Behind the Scenes (N...
Evenkia
By Berta Tilmantaite
02 Sep 2013

Diupkin Lake, Evenkia, Russia

In one of the coldest places on earth, 1000km from the nearest city, in the depths of Siberia, one storyteller braved the deadly cold to tell the story of Oleg, a hunter who lives off the Siberian Taiga. Like Oleg, storyteller Berta Tilmantaite sees beauty and abundance in the world's harshest climates.

This video takes a behind the scenes look at the production of Berta Tilmantaite's "Oleg the Hunter."

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 13
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

An asador takes care of the fire, while a curious crowd gathers around the field.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 14
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

This way of cooking takes between five to 8 hours, the most the best, it's a patient man's affair.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 15
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

The omnipresent smoke gives a particular taste to the meat, some cooks place the meat so it's constantly bathed with smoke, some prefer to have as little smoke as possible.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 16
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

Adolfo Schneidewinde, one of the organizers of the gathering, shows the piece he cooked previous to presenting it to the jury that will pick the best.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 17
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

An asador cuts a slice to present the dish to the jury.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 02
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

An "asador" (cook) carefully checks the intensity of the fire.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 03
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

This way of cooking takes between five to 8 hours, the most the best.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 04
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

This way of cooking takes between five to 8 hours, the most the best.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 05
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

This way of cooking takes between five to 8 hours, the most the best.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 06
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

A piece of meat is placed on stakes near the fire. Between 5 to 8 hours it will be done, the most the better.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 07
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

Asadores chat and prepare appetizers and garnish while the asado is slowly cooked. This way of cooking takes between five to 8 hours, the most the best.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 01
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

This kind of meetings are filled with humour, a necessary ingredient since asadores spend hours taking care of the meat while it cooks.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 08
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

This gatherings are usually done as part of folklore fairs or national celebrations, and summon lots of people that wait to buy and taste a piece of asado.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 09
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

Big pieces of meat, sausages and even bread are placed near the fire. The type of wood and the smoke make for a very particular taste.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 10
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

An asador checks how it's going. There are a couple of hours ahead yet, and people are already gathering to get their piece.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 11
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

An asador throws "salmuera", a combination of water, oil, salt and all kinds of condiments unique to every cook, a secret recipe that most of them will only reveal to those who will continue their tradition.

Thumb sm
Argentina Asado Encounter 12
Rosario
By Patricio Murphy
19 Jun 2013

Beside burnt logs, a piece of meat is almost done.

Thumb sm
Salt of the Earth: The Ancient Villag...
Nuodeng
By David Tacon
14 Jun 2013

Like in Europe, salt has played a significant role in Asian history for thousands of years and has been a driver of commerce: a relatively rare, high-value product which could be exchanged for other high-value products from tea to silk. The English word “salary” dates back to the time when Roman soldiers were paid in part with salt.

A tax on salt was one of the causes of the French Revolution. More than a seasoning, salt is a preservative which can keep meat and other foods from spoiling, a quality which made it indispensable for long winters and long journeys by land and sea. Much of its trade in Asia took place along the famed Tea Horse Road – a route that stretched from China’s Sichuan Province, through Yunnan Province, to Tibet, Myanmar and India.

The ancient village of Nuodeng, nestled in a valley in Yunnan, 165 km northwest of Dali, is one of the province’s only sources of salt. As far back as the Han Dynasty, more than two thousand years ago, the village’s plentiful salt reserves have been mined from salt wells. Cylinders of brine-boiled salt from Nuodeng and legs of its famous salt-cured ham were carried to the furthest reaches of the Tea Horse Road. In the process, Nuodung grew so wealthy that it became known as the richest village in China.

Centuries of prosperity came to an end when China’s salt industry was nationalized in 1949. Evidence of past riches can still be seen in some of the older mansions and ancestral halls. To this day, descendants of salt merchant families continue to extract salt from brine by boiling it over huge wood-fired cauldrons.

Yankun Yang, her husband Bingquan and their two adult sons are one of a handful of families who carry on the tradition of salt production in Nuodeng. “Making salt is not particularly complicated, but it is time consuming,” Yankun explains. “To make fine salt, one needs patience as well as an understanding of heat and evaporation.”

It takes about a day to make salt. As water evaporates, white salt crystals are heaped into wooden baskets to dry in the sun. The salt is then pressed into cylinders with a two piece bamboo mould before finally being arranged on an iron tray to harden over coals.

“It is potassium that makes our salt special. It’s indispensable for Nuodeng ham and it’s what gives it its unique flavour,” says Yankun. Both salt and salt-cured Nuodeng ham is still a major source of income for the village, along with tourism. “It’s an integral part of life in our community.”

A visit to Nuodeng is a journey into Chinese history. The village curls through a steep valley in a yin-yang S-shape. Its tumbledown walls, ancient streets and mountainous scenery create an atmosphere of great beauty and serenity. The clang of bells that hang from the harnesses of horses and donkeys, echo through the ochre-hued hills. These four-legged all-terrain vehicles are still used today by residents to transport heavy loads up the steep steps of Nuodeng, much of which remains inaccessible to modern machines.

Interest in Nuodeng’s salt-cured ham skyrocketed two years ago when the village was featured on the hugely successful culinary series A Bite of China, produced by China Central Television. Demand for Nuodeng ham increased seventeen-fold overnight. Ayi Huang, who also runs a guesthouse for tourists, follows the same recipe for ham passed down through generations.

Each year during the Chinese New Year festivities, the Huang family slaughters pigs to make around 14 legs of ham. “I like white pigs best because they have more dark meat and less fat compared to black and brown pigs”, she says.

There are five stages to ham production: first the pork is ‘dressed’ – that is, excess fat and skin is removed. It is then drained of blood, to ensure it does not spoil. Before the pork is rubbed with salt from hoof to haunch, it is cured with a locally distilled corn spirit known as baogujiu and then hung to dry for between 12 to 24 months.

Most family homes in Nuodeng have a room set aside for drying ham. Hygiene is paramount when making ham. “We have to be very careful to make sure that no flies get into the room. If even one fly gets in, all the ham could be ruined.”

The ham has a delicate, slightly sweet flavour not unlike Spanish jamon. The secret to its taste, Ayi Huang believes, is in the pigs’ diet, which consists entirely of locally grown corn, yellow beans and green vegetables. The ham is sold locally for 100 CNY per kilogram and is so valuable to the town’s economy that those who make it rarely eat it themselves.

“It’s only served to very important guests,” Ayi Huang’s sister-in-law Soaozi Huang explains. “If there’s no ham on the table, it’s not a banquet.”

Thumb sm
Camel Wrestling in Turkey (16 of 16)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
03 Feb 2013

Pelitkoy, Turkey--Camel socuk is a sausage made from a mixture of camel and beef and is served as a novelty during camel wrestling tournaments. Camels that are not able to wrestle often end up slaughtered for their meat.

Frame 0004
Skyrocketing Food Prices Ahead Of Mus...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
25 Oct 2012

Skyrocketing prices hit Egyptians ahead of the big Muslim holiday, the Feast of Sacrifice (Eid Al-Adha), particularly the prices of meat, vegetables and fruits, which Egyptians buy in exceptionally large quantities on this occasion.

Muslims in Egypt and worldwide buy sacrificial animals, whether a cow, ram, goat, etc, to slaughter on the first day of the Feast, known by Muslims as Eid, but those who cannot afford it just buy meat to cook and share with family members.

The kilogram of meat used to vary from 35 to 40 Egyptian pounds, but on these days it has exceeded 70 pounds, which is not affordable by a lot of Egyptians, 40% of which live under poverty line. [1 USD = 6.1 EGP]

Egyptian butchers complain that the difficult financial conditions of the people reflected in their selling.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ali Abdel-Tawwab, butcher, store owner:
“Selling is very weak and things are very quiet. The difficult financial conditions affect everything, the people and the market.”

Rising prices didn’t stop at meat, but the prices of vegetables and fruits also recorded notable increase.

Some vegetable and fruit sellers say that the Eid eve used to be a prime selling season before the revolution, and that this year the selling on this day is just like other days.

Egyptian customers now reduce the quantities of food they used to buy for such an occasion, whether it is meat, fruits or vegetables.

Some see that food prices are incredibly higher this year while others see that they are reasonable.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Fatima, woman, customer at the marketplace:
“Whether it is on Eid days or ordinary days, Food prices have become very expensive. It’s rather too expensive.”

A few hours before the big Muslim holiday kicks off, Egyptians, 90% of whom are Muslims, hope that the new president and his government fulfill their promises regarding improving people’s standard of living and financial conditions, boosting economy and reducing poverty.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 25, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 25, 2012
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot, a bridge and traffic in Cairo
2. Various shots at a butcher’s, butchers chopping and slicing meat, a customer waiting
3. Various shots of cows at a stockyard
4. Pan right, a man dragging a cow
5. Various shots of sheep at a stockyard in the street
6. Various shots of customers at a butcher’s
7. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ali Abdel-Tawwab, butcher, store owner:
“Selling is very weak and things are very quiet. The difficult financial conditions affect everything, the people and the market.” 8. Various shots of a marketplace of vegetables and fruits
9. Various shots of fruits displayed for sale on stands in the marketplace, including peaches, pineapples, mangoes, etc
10. Various shots of a fruit seller
11. Various shots of tomatoes, cucumbers, potatoes and other vegetables displayed for sale in the marketplace
12. Various shots of the vegetable seller
13. Long shot, people walking around at the marketplace
14. Various shots of a marketplace of vegetables and fruits displayed for sale
15. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Fatima, woman, customer at the marketplace:
“Whether it is on Eid days or ordinary days, Food prices have become very expensive. It’s rather too expensive.” 16. Pan right, an old man buying something at the marketplace
17. Long shot, people walking around at the marketplace

Thumb sm
Butcher
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Dominic.J.Lucarelli
08 Jun 2012

A butcher at a morning market in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Frame 0004
Egypt's Agriculture Ministry: 6,000 L...
Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
23 Mar 2012

Cairo, Egypt | March 22, 2012

Egypt's Ministry of Agriculture said in its daily report on Thursday, March 22, that the outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD) left at least 6,000 Livestock dead and 46,000 infected so far.
On the other hand, the FMD that spread throughout 25 governorates in Egypt threatens to prevail in North Africa and the Middle East causing a regional food security issue according to the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).
Investors and livestock farm owners, as well as veterinarians, believe that the government is to blame because of neither practicing strict preventive measures at the early stage of the FMD appearance nor providing a vaccine for the disease.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Kamel Girgis, investor at the European Countryside farming project in Egypt:
"FMD is spreading and we resort to preventive means. We do not be negligent in raising the animals. We perform something like quarantine and we raise the animal quality at the same time. We also add Sodium bicarbonates to the water to prevent infection, cleaning the floors well. However, the effective vaccine hasn’t been provided by the state yet."

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mustafa Fahmy, veterinarian specialized in animal medicine and surgery:
"There should have been preventive measures, preventing transpiration among governorates and shutting off marketplaces. That should’ve been done two months ago! The government make decisions now when it's too late, which is useless. On the other hand, where is the role of vet quarantine authorities?"

However, medical sources said the country has recently started to produce local vaccine to contain the issue.
Some Egyptians are reluctant to eat meat due to the FMD issue, resorting to chicken and fish as alternatives, while others think the FMD outbreak is a rumor and they continue buying meat, particularly that supervised by the army vet units.
SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian butcher:
"The customers were afraid that the meat might be infected of the disease. They feared to buy it. Praise be to Allah, they started to buy from us because they trust us. The meat is very good and there is nothing wrong with it."

SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – Egyptian woman outside the butchery:
"The meat is good but they made us afraid because of the FMD issue. Afterwards, the prices of chicken and fish rose."

SOUNDBITE 5 (Arabic) – Egyptian man outside the butchery:
"For me, I have no problem because I know that 75% of the livestock were slaughtered before the FMD appeared. On the other hand, the meat supervised by the army is trustworthy because the army has a vet unit that tests the meat and any food and they care for the good of the people and the country. They cannot harm the citizens." Unexpectedly, poultry and fish sellers complain lower sales although they are the safe alternative for concerned Egyptians. This is because merchants raised their prices as a consequence of the FMD.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: March 22, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: March 22, 2012
Length: 0:03:18
Video Size: 163 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Various external shots of Egypt's Ministry of Agriculture in Cairo
2- Various shots of a livestock farm at the Cairo-Alexandria desert road
3- Various shots of livestock at the farm
4- Various shots of dead animals thrown in a vast area outside the farm
5- Long shot outside the farm
6- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Kamel Girgis, investor at the European Countryside farming project in Egypt:
"FMD is spreading and we resort to preventive means. We do not be negligent in raising the animals. We perform something like quarantine and we raise the animal quality at the same time. We also add Sodium bicarbonates to the water to prevent infection, cleaning the floors well. However, the effective vaccine hasn’t been provided by the state yet." 7- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mustafa Fahmy, veterinarian specialized in animal medicine and surgery:
"There should have been preventive measures, preventing transpiration among governorates and shutting off marketplaces. That should’ve been done two months ago! The government make decisions now when it's too late, which is useless. On the other hand, where is the role of vet quarantine authorities?"
8- Various shots of livestock at the farm
9- Pan right, a marketplace in Cairo
10- Various shots of a butchery
11- Various shots of animal meat displayed at the butchery
12- Various shots of a butcher chopping the meat
13- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian butcher:
"The customers were afraid that the meat might be infected of the disease. They feared to buy it. Praise be to Allah, they started to buy from us because they trust us. The meat is very good and there is nothing wrong with it." 14- SOUNDBITE 4 (Arabic) – Egyptian woman outside the butchery:
"The meat is good but they made us afraid because of the FMD issue. Afterwards, the prices of chicken and fish rose." 15- SOUNDBITE 5 (Arabic) – Egyptian man outside the butchery:
"For me, I have no problem because I know that 75% of the livestock were slaughtered before the FMD appeared. On the other hand, the meat supervised by the army is trustworthy because the army has a vet unit that tests the meat and any food and they care for the good of the people and the country. They cannot harm the citizens." 16- Various shots of the marketplace
17- Various shots of chicken displayed for sale at the marketplace
18- Various shots of women buying chicken
19- Medium shot of the marketplace

Thumb sm
After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The men do not work as much as the women. But they always handle the slaughtering of animals. The younger men are shepherds while the older men are the patriarchs of the family. They are in charge and are responsible for making sure that everything is being done according to plan.