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AIDS Monastery 06
Lopburi Province
By Antolo
03 Feb 2015

Rachen, 58. He used to inject heroin. He was fired from his neighborhood when his neighbors realized that he was infected.

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AIDS Monastery 07
Lopburi Province
By Antolo
03 Feb 2015

Pon, 48, joined the monastery seven years ago, after a routine check revealed that he had HIV. Since then he quit his family without saying a word to don't disturb them. Now he kills time on his bed drawing portraits of the founder of this center.

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AIDS Monastery 08
Lopburi Province
By Antolo
03 Feb 2015

Maprod came to the temple with her mother seven months ago. Her mother got AIDS, but he was born healthy. Now he’s almost 2 years old.

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AIDS Monastery 09
Lopburi Province
By Antolo
03 Feb 2015

Aman, 45. HIV affected his brain and he became deaf 5 years ago.

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AIDS Monastery 10
Lopburi Province
By Antolo
03 Feb 2015

Some of the patients are so weak that can not even walk. They must wait for helpers to get rid of their bed prisons daily.

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AIDS Monastery 11
Lopburi Province
By Antolo
03 Feb 2015

The only isolated area in the whole building is a small dorm settled for tuberculosis patients, at the end of the main room.

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Dreadful Disease Appears in Eastern G...
Ghouta
By Mohamad al-jazaare
24 Dec 2014

Hamourieh, Eastern Ghouta, Syria

Harsh humanitarian conditions in besieged Eastern Ghouta near Damascus have caused a rare, grisly disease surface. Young Hiba is being treated from myiasis, a skin infestation caused fly maggots.

Staff at the local Dar al-Rahma Medical Center (DRMC) are doing their best to offer Hiba and other patients proper care, despite the severe shortage of medical supplies in Eastern Ghouta.

The center is also treating many patients from cancer. Tasneem is a five-year-old girl who is diagnosed with leukemia. DRMC’s director Dr. Wissam says that she and her colleagues face a large difficulty in providing cancer medications that will not expire soon.

Shot List

1 Various of Dr. Wissam picking worms out of Hiba (young girl)’s scalp.

Natural Sound (Arabic, Woman and man) conversation between Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center and Hiba’s father

Dr. Wissam: “These are pouches. If we do not clean them they might be hiding something bigger. I do not like this area. They should not have remained.”

Father: “Her mother is giving her a shower every day.”

Dr. Wissam: “There is a lack of education and awareness (…). These remaining pouches will not help me. I wanted to see her in two days but I do not want to see anything like this.”

2 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center

(01:12) “Hiba’s case is the first case of miyasis that we diagnosed in Eastern Ghouta. Her scalp is infected. Such diseases are due to the lack of pesticides, which causes the appearance of large houseflies. In addition to that, these diseases are caused by the lack of water in the area.” (01:29)

(01:29) “At the moment, the girl’s condition has improved, and she is healing and under medical observation. We hope not to discover new cases.” (01:35)

3 Wide of Dr. Wissam, Hiba and Hiba’s father at the medical center.

Natural Sound

Dr. Wissam: “This is why she was in pain and could not sleep. After they [the worms] were taken out, she felt better. She has not been complaining of any pain.”

Father: “Not at all.”

Dr. Wissam: “We will only observe her. If anything appears, we will see it immediately. I do not want to cut her [scalp].”

4 SOUNDBITE (Man, Arabic) Ahmad, Hiba’s Father and an unidentified woman

(02:26) “It all started a week ago, and we thought it was an allergy. I took her to the medical dispensary where they prescribed her a medication and ointments. I then took her to another dispensary in Harasta where they told me it was probably impetigo [a skin disease] and they prescribed her an ointment. But my daughter was in a lot of pain, and I thought it does not look like a normal allergy. So I brought her here after her situation got worse and she was in pain at night. We feared that she might had a malignant disease. When we discovered that she had worms in her head, we directly thought that this was not normal. We brought her here.” (03:16)

5 Close up of Dr. Wissam taking worms out of Hiba’s scalp.

Natural Sound (Arabic) Conversation among

Dr. Wissam: “Do we have tweezers? [UNINTELLIGIBLE] Do you know blue flies? These are blue flies’ eggs.”

Father: “What about this?”

Dr. Wissam: “You have to shave her head, brother. Alright?”

Father: “Yes”

Dr. Wissam: “Because they are hiding in the hair. If there is anything that has not come out…”

Unseen woman: “How could they say it is normal and the girl was not hit by a bullet or did cut her head?”

Father: “They diagnosed it as impetigo.”

Unseen woman: “When did this start, doctor?

Doctor Wissam: “Three days ago.”

Father: “Three days ago, she started having a headache.”

Unseen woman:”How did this decay happen?”

Dr. Wissam: “It started before.”

Father: “Her face and neck were swollen.”

Unseen woman: “How did the fly lay its eggs here?”

Dr. Wissam: “Only God knows. One, two, three, four, five, six – six worms from a single spot. I once received a patient whose eye was eaten [by worms].”

6 Various of street. Natural Sound: (Arabic) Call for prayer.

7 Various of Tasneem, young girl in hospital bed

8 Various of Doctor Wissam injecting needle in Tasneem. Natural Sound: “Give me your hand.”

9 Close up of serum dripping

10 Various of Tasneem in hospital bed.

11 Various of Doctor Wissam injecting needle in Tasneem.

Natural Sound: Tasneem crying, Doctor saying to her: “We will only remove this. It is over. We removed it. It is over. It is over. There is nothing.”

12 SOUNDBITE (Woman, Arabic) Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center

(09:20) Tasneem is a young girl aged five; she suffers from severe lymphocytic inflammation after her father was martyred. She is currently under treatment, but we are facing obstacles in supplying medicaments that have long shelf lives due to the siege on Ghouta (09:35).

(09:35) “Tasneem is not the only child who suffers from this disease. The number of children diagnosed with such diseases increased lately, due to the conditions under the siege on Ghouta. [Inadequate] nutrition or environment, as well as psychological factors largely increase the rate of these diseases.” (09:52)

13 Various of petri dish preparation

14 SOUNDBITE (Woman, Arabic) Um Imad, Tasneem’s grandmother

(10:17) Tanseem has had leukaemia for almost two years. She was treated in Damascus first, but due to circumstances we could no longer go there, I mean because of the siege. Two months ago, the condition resurfaced and we came to this center where she is being treated, thanks be to God. I wish that God rewards them [medical center workers] well (10:46)

15 Various of Tasneem walking

16 SOUNDBITE (Girl, Arabic) Tanseem, girl suffering from cancer

(11:08) My name is Tasneem. I wake up every morning, I go to school and then I play with Toufic. My grandmother then takes me to the office [clinic]; they insert a needle into my vein [UNINTELLIGIBLE].

17 Wide of Tasneem playing with other children.

18 SOUNDBITE (Girl, Arabic) Tanseem, girl suffering from cancer

(11:40) “Here is my father’s photo. He was going to Dukhanya [town in Eastern Ghouta] when he was shot by a sniper and martyred.”

“This is my cousin, I always play with her. And this is Toufic, he is older than I am. He always plays with me. This is Mohammad, my younger brother. He does not give his mother a hard time.”

“Bye.”

19 Various of decomposing cattle carcasses

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Ebola: The Burial Team
Unification Town
By kierankesner
22 Sep 2014

In Unification Town, Liberia young men take on the grim job of burying the dead lost to the Ebola virus currently devastating West Africa. Careful preparation is made before entering the homes of the deceased, and the team must disinfect thoroughly after removing the body. Family members watching the burial from a distance are instructed not to visit the grave for at least a year. Without proper burial, the bodies of Ebola victims could perpetuate the spread of the virus that has already claimed over 2,500 lives.

Burial teams in Sierra Leone have recently come under attack as locals become suspicious of aid workers trying to prevent the further spread of the virus that has been slowly ravaging larger and larger areas of West Africa since the first case was discovered in December 2013. According to the New England Journal of Medicine, by September 2014 the number of confirmed cases exceeded those in all previous outbreaks of the disease.

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"We Drank from the Well": Typhoid Spr...
Eastern Gouta
By Mohamad al-jazaare
17 Sep 2014

September 17, 2014
Eastern Ghouta, Damascus, Syria

In the shadow of the siege under which the population of Eastern Ghouta lives, a new crisis is unfolding: the spread Typhoid fever. The disease’s spread is most likely the result of the city's polluted drinking water, which is sourced from unfiltered water pumps.
Civilians are forced to use the pumps, as regime forces have cut off their major water supplies.

15-year-old Ahmad was recently struck with Typhoid fever. His condition deteriorated due to the unavailability of proper treatment and medicine to the point that he had to be admitted to an ICU. The doctor responsible for him discusses his case.

Mustafa, another young boy, who is currently in a better condition than Ahmad, is being treated in a field hospital.

Sound Bites:
Sound Bite 1: (Man, Arabic)
Oday Mohamad: A doctor in a field hospital:

"Ahmed is 15 year old child who is suffering from Typhus due to the polluted water that is mixed with the water of the sewer system. [The water is] used for drinking and other needs. Most patients are being treated in clinics and there are huge numbers arriving to the clinics everyday. However, Ahmed, is in the intensive care unit now, due to the effects of Typhus on his nervous system. He is fainting and his speech ability is very slow. He is being treated at the moment with the humble abilities that we have here in the hospital. We lack antibiotics and medical equipment that are used in diagnosis."

Sound Bite 2: (Man, Arabic)
Abu Ahmed, Typhus patient in a medical clinic:

"We drank from the well, unsanitary water, we had to drink this water, we do not have any other option. We do not have water, we know it is unsanitary and unclean water, but we had to drink it. We sensed that we were starting to get sick and we realized it was the symptoms of Typhus, so we came here to get treated."

Sound Bite 3: (Man, Arabic)
Mustafa: A Typhoid Patient:

"We are here in besieged Ghouta, we do not have electricity or medication. We are denied a lot of necessities, so we had to drink water from the wells, which gave us many diseases, like Typhus. There are no medications here at all and, if we find them, they would be very expensive”.

Shot List:
Various shots show water being pumped out of the well and the children taking water to their homes and shots show how unsanitary the water is.
various shots show Ahmed in the intensive care unit being treated by his doctor
Various shots show Abu Ahmed in a clinic being examined
Various shots show Mustafa in the field hospital while the doctor is examining him.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Bardarash, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

For the Iraqi woman who finds herself with dependent children and without a male figure at her side, security becomes a constant worry in addition to the emotional and psychological destruction visited on them by the Islamic State. Keeping in touch with friends and relatives helps distract them and maintain a sense of community.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The living conditions of minorities persecuted by the advance of Islamic State militants can be read on the faces of refugees no matter their age. Despite this extreme hardship, the hope that their children will be able to build a better future keeps them going.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Forced migration is in some cases synonymous with survival. These women were found after escaping from an armed group. Young and old, none of them are safe, they say.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Bardarash, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

In this makeshift refuge, the little ones spend most of their hours stretched out on the floor in the corridors or in empty classrooms of the school.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

Aid from local associations has not been enough to support the Shabak community living in Rovia's mosque. A woman needs to move for the night between the cars parked outside.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

Recognized as an ethnic minority in 1952, the Shabak are now on the run from the militias of the Islamic State. They have already experienced persecution in the past, notably by the regime of Saddam Hussein. 70 families of them take refuge in this mosque from their latest threat.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

A Shabak man is sick, lying on a rug while a woman tends to him, as the public hospital can only be reached in the morning. During the day, temperatures reach around 45 degrees.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

An elderly woman prepares to cook dinner, shielding the fire with wooden panels. Inside the mosque there is no pavement, making hygiene a challenge.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

In the tiny village of Rovia a few miles from Mosul, a city currently under control of the Islamic State, the Shabak community has found refuge in a mosque under construction. Inside the community, the proportion of children to adults is very high. The adults hope to spare their children from the psychological trauma of war.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
19 Aug 2014

Shabak women are preparing for the evening meal in a mosque along the road that leads to Mosul. With only moonlight available, people who sleep outside must cook, eat, and wash quickly.

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Malakal, South Sudan
Malakal
By Gianuca Panella
10 Jul 2014

This month South Sudan hits the 3-year anniversary of its creation as a state, amidst war, poverty, and disease.

Since its civil war erupted in December, upwards of 80,000 civilians have fled to eight different UN camps across the country. In May, the UN warned that South Sudan, the world’s newest nation, was on the brink of genocide and famine. Recently, a cholera outbreak swept the country, further exacerbating the dire emergency situation. Over 1 million South Sudanese citizens have fled their homes in total.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” said Aimee Ansari, the South Sudan Country Director of CARE International, who has worked on humanitarian crises across the globe. “It is crisis on top of crisis here. There are no breaks.”

Last month, the rainy season began, complicating the transport and distribution of life-saving emergency aid across the country. International NGOs and their local partners are working around the clock, but the UN warns that only about 40% of their budget goals on the South Sudan crisis have been met.

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Gun Disease in Myanmar
By Spike Johnson
10 Oct 2013

In the gold mines of Sinktu and Thabait Kyin, in the Mandalay division of Myanmar, gold mining is famous. Over thirty gold mines are active, but the scene doesn't look much like wealth. Half naked men, with rusty pneumatic drills and homemade dynamite are lowered 500 feet, on fraying ropes, into holes in the ground. Covering their faces with rags, they drill gold ore from the stone.

“We break the rocks with high pressured guns, but breathe the small particles that come from breaking the stone. We contract lung infections that we call "gun disease," says Wat Tay, 35, a gold miner from Sintku Township.

This year gold production in the area has doubled due to softening government sanctions and international demand. Myanmar's huge mineral deposits are seen as key sectors in export-driven growth. In recent months the price of gold has slowly risen in Myanmar, possibly linked to the decline of the dollar, as an opportunistic public sell their jewelry at high prices ready to buy back if prices drop.

Forums are being held in capital cities by the Myanmar government, mine owners, and the Ministry of Mines to persuade foreign investment from corporate companies for industrial technology. The idea is to reduce Myanmar's poverty rate from 26 percent to 16 percent by 2015, by exporting the country's gold reserves. However, added demand for export means an increased need for manpower, working hours, and medical support.

Through the night groups of men squat above mine shafts, ankle deep in muddy puddles, waiting to haul out ore or winch up their friends. After working in the mines for around ten years, the worker's lungs give in form undiagnosed diseases. Hidden in bamboo huts, attached to oxygen, they weaze out their last days.

“The owners of gold pits don't care about the health issues of the miners, so the health problems are increasing. They don't pay for safety protection for us, so we make do ourselves, like putting some clothes over our mouths, or buying cheap masks to reduce the dust we breath in,” says Wat Tay.

Miners are given one or two bananas after a shift in the tunnels, to help with nutrition. But no respiration equipment is provided by the mine owners, and the miners don't have the money to invest in equipment themselves. Although cases are frequent, perhaps inevitable, there is no health care system for the miners and no diagnosis of “gun disease.” Instead they are given a tank of oxygen and left to fend for themselves, too weak to seek other employment or to leave their huts.

“I can't breathe well. If I breath my abdominal muscles are tight and it hurts also in my back. I pain feel when I breathe. Twice they've given me pills for Tuberculosis, but this medicine has no effect for me,” says Kwin Tone Sel, 42. He used to mine in Sintku Township, before his lung disease prevented him from leaving his bed.

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Tuberculosis In Cambodia
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By U.S. Editor
14 Jul 2013

Cambodia is one of the 22 countries most affected by tuberculosis in the world. The country ranks second in the prevalence rate of tuberculosis, after South Africa. To get cured, the patients have to go through a stringent six-months daily-dose therapy of multiple medications. Often, these medications cause severe side-effects and co-infections with other diseases like HIV/AIDS, Cancer, etc make the lives of patients impossible due to drug interactions. This leads to lack of compliance which may result in multi-drug resistant TB, a lethal form of the disease and almost a death warrant. Once infected, the cure from this disease under the public sector of such a country is not a small hope to live by. Therefore, there is a stark dejection in the lives of people suffering from tuberculosis.

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The Daily Dose | Tuberculosis in Camb...
Takeo, Cambodia
By Aman Singh
12 Jul 2013

A female peasant in a village consuming her daily dose of TB medication.

Cambodia is one of the 22 countries most affected by tuberculosis in the world. The country ranks second in the prevalence rate of tuberculosis, after South Africa. To get cured, the patients have to go through a stringent six-months daily-dose therapy of multiple medications. Often, these medications cause severe side-effects and co-infections with other diseases like HIV/AIDS, Cancer, etc make the lives of patients impossible due to drug interactions. This leads to lack of compliance which may result in multi-drug resistant TB, a lethal form of the disease and almost a death warrant. Once infected, the cure from this disease under the public sector of such a country is not a small hope to live by. Therefore, there is a stark dejection in the lives of people suffering from tuberculosis.

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The Daily Dose | Tuberculosis in Camb...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Aman Singh
12 Jul 2013

Hands of a patient receiving medications for the day from an NGO community health worker.

Cambodia is one of the 22 countries most affected by tuberculosis in the world. The country ranks second in the prevalence rate of tuberculosis, after South Africa. To get cured, the patients have to go through a stringent six-months daily-dose therapy of multiple medications. Often, these medications cause severe side-effects and co-infections with other diseases like HIV/AIDS, Cancer, etc make the lives of patients impossible due to drug interactions. This leads to lack of compliance which may result in multi-drug resistant TB, a lethal form of the disease and almost a death warrant. Once infected, the cure from this disease under the public sector of such a country is not a small hope to live by. Therefore, there is a stark dejection in the lives of people suffering from tuberculosis.

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Public Health Sector in Cambodia | Tu...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Aman Singh
12 Jul 2013

A patient shown to be undergoing the chest x-ray for the diagnosis of pulmonary negative tuberculosis at CENAT. These tests are supposed to be free under the public sector, but the patients end up paying for quick access and test results.

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Isolation | Tuberculosis in Cambodia
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Aman Singh
12 Jul 2013

An old patient waiting for TB test results in Phnom Penh. The patients admitted in the government hospitals are kept in separate wards away from the administration and other areas.

Cambodia is one of the 22 countries most affected by tuberculosis in the world. The country ranks second in the prevalence rate of tuberculosis, after South Africa. To get cured, the patients have to go through a stringent six-months daily-dose therapy of multiple medications. Often, these medications cause severe side-effects and co-infections with other diseases like HIV/AIDS, Cancer, etc make the lives of patients impossible due to drug interactions. This leads to lack of compliance which may result in multi-drug resistant TB, a lethal form of the disease and almost a death warrant. Once infected, the cure from this disease under the public sector of such a country is not a small hope to live by. Therefore, there is a stark dejection in the lives of people suffering from tuberculosis.

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Isolation | Tuberculosis in Cambodia
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Aman Singh
12 Jul 2013

The TB patients admitted in the government hospitals are kept in separate wards away from the administration and other areas.

Cambodia is one of the 22 countries most affected by tuberculosis in the world. The country ranks second in the prevalence rate of tuberculosis, after South Africa. To get cured, the patients have to go through a stringent six-months daily-dose therapy of multiple medications. Often, these medications cause severe side-effects and co-infections with other diseases like HIV/AIDS, Cancer, etc make the lives of patients impossible due to drug interactions. This leads to lack of compliance which may result in multi-drug resistant TB, a lethal form of the disease and almost a death warrant. Once infected, the cure from this disease under the public sector of such a country is not a small hope to live by. Therefore, there is a stark dejection in the lives of people suffering from tuberculosis.

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THE FIGHT AGAINST MALARIA: DR ALBERT ...
Lambarene, Gabon
By serengeti1 serengeti1
10 May 2013

100 years ago te Albert Schweitzer Hospital was established on the banks of the Ogooue River, in Lambarene, Gabon. Today its Medical Research Unit leads the charge to discover an antidote against a scourge that kills hundreds of thousands of people - many of them children - in Africa each year. That scourge is called malaria, carried by Anopheles mosquitos.

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
29 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Leishmania spreads in Syria
Idleb, Syria
By Idleb Press
28 Apr 2013

Leishmania spreads in Syria.
A video report about this disease from the village of Maar Shourin which is located in the countryside of Idleb.

Due to the lack of basic amenities and health care in Syria, Leishmaniasis, a complex disease, has been affecting a large number of the population in Idleb, northern Syria. The disease is transmitted through the a bite of a sandfly, affecting different parts of the body, resulting in sores on the skin and welts. The sores, sometimes, get infected.

Since the basic conditions of the Syrian people is very poor, the disease is most likely to be fatal. Also, regarding the fact that wartime conditions compromise the immune system, this disease is bound to spread quickly.

The medicine required for treatment is scarce in Syria, but the people of Idlib are attempting to assist every infected person without a fee.

It is difficult, at the moment, to assess the number of Leishmaniasis cases in Syria, but the poor conditions showed that the disease will continue transmitting from one person to another.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Children living in the Shansharah archeological site swim in the ancient baths. Microbes proliferate in the water of this artificial swimming pool which is used both for washing the dishes and laundry. Those unhygienic conditions exacerbate the spread of disease.

Les enfants qui vivent sur le site archéologique de Shansharah se baignent dans les anciens thermes. Les microbes pullulent dans l’eau de cette piscine artificielle qui sert à la fois à la lessive et à la vaisselle. Ces conditions d’hygiène aggravent la propagation des maladies.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

The refugees have put some tarp at the entry of the graveyard where they live on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. Living conditions are extremely hard when the rain seeps into the graveyard. It has been one year that hundreds of displaced people are taking shelter in the ruins of these famous « dead cities » in the North-West. Far away from the surrounding cities, they are less exposed to the Syrian army air strikes.
Les réfugiés ont installé des bâches à l'entrée du tombeau où ils vivent dans sur le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb. Les conditions de vie sont extrêmement dures quand l'eau de pluie s'infiltre dans la tombe. Depuis un an des centaines de déplacés trouvent refuge dans les ruines des célèbres « villes mortes » du nord ouest du pays. Éloignées des villes alentours, elles sont moins ciblées par les attaques aériennes de l'armée syrienne.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Hygiene is very bad on the Shansharah archeological site, Idlib region. They fled the air strikes without being able to bring their personal belongings.

Les conditions d'hygiène des populations déplacées dans le site archéologique de Shansharah dans la région d'Idleb sont déplorables. Ils ont fui les bombardements sans pouvoir emporter leurs affaires personnelles.

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Beautify Moaret Mesrin (4 of 4)
Idleb, Syria
By Idleb Press
09 Apr 2013

Facing difficult daily lives, increasing social needs along with a desire to help others by providing care and services, young people are volunteering with the Revolutionary Civic Council in Moaret Mesrin to implement a new campaign called "Beautify Moaret Mesrin."

The "Beautify Moaret Mesrin" campaign is raising awareness among people about the importance of maintaining hygiene in neighborhoods where destruction of city infrastructure has led to an absence of basic services. According to an Idleb Press reporter, quoting a volunteer, "It has to be different leadership or another organized system that takes care of social needs and civic services, instead of government systems."

The campaign will run three days a week and volunteers will help to reduce the prevalence of disease caused by the accumulation of garbage in the streets, broken sewer systems and the spread of insects in the city. Not just cleaning streets and filling holes, the volunteers will also create beauty in paintings and murals, trying to raise the spirits of the Moaret Mesrin community.

Idleb Press, the Media Office and media group of Moaret Mesren

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Beautify Moaret Mesrin (3 of 4)
Idleb, Syria
By Idleb Press
09 Apr 2013

Facing difficult daily lives, increasing social needs along with a desire to help others by providing care and services, young people are volunteering with the Revolutionary Civic Council in Moaret Mesrin to implement a new campaign called "Beautify Moaret Mesrin."

The "Beautify Moaret Mesrin" campaign is raising awareness among people about the importance of maintaining hygiene in neighborhoods where destruction of city infrastructure has led to an absence of basic services. According to an Idleb Press reporter, quoting a volunteer, "It has to be different leadership or another organized system that takes care of social needs and civic services, instead of government systems."

The campaign will run three days a week and volunteers will help to reduce the prevalence of disease caused by the accumulation of garbage in the streets, broken sewer systems and the spread of insects in the city. Not just cleaning streets and filling holes, the volunteers will also create beauty in paintings and murals, trying to raise the spirits of the Moaret Mesrin community.

Idleb Press, the Media Office and media group of Moaret Mesren

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Beautify Moaret Mesrin (2 of 4)
Idleb, Syria
By Idleb Press
09 Apr 2013

Facing difficult daily lives, increasing social needs along with a desire to help others by providing care and services, young people are volunteering with the Revolutionary Civic Council in Moaret Mesrin to implement a new campaign called "Beautify Moaret Mesrin."

The "Beautify Moaret Mesrin" campaign is raising awareness among people about the importance of maintaining hygiene in neighborhoods where destruction of city infrastructure has led to an absence of basic services. According to an Idleb Press reporter, quoting a volunteer, "It has to be different leadership or another organized system that takes care of social needs and civic services, instead of government systems."

The campaign will run three days a week and volunteers will help to reduce the prevalence of disease caused by the accumulation of garbage in the streets, broken sewer systems and the spread of insects in the city. Not just cleaning streets and filling holes, the volunteers will also create beauty in paintings and murals, trying to raise the spirits of the Moaret Mesrin community.

Idleb Press, the Media Office and media group of Moaret Mesren

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Beautify Moaret Mesrin (1 of 4)
Idleb, Syria
By Idleb Press
09 Apr 2013

Facing difficult daily lives, increasing social needs along with a desire to help others by providing care and services, young people are volunteering with the Revolutionary Civic Council in Moaret Mesrin to implement a new campaign called "Beautify Moaret Mesrin."

The "Beautify Moaret Mesrin" campaign is raising awareness among people about the importance of maintaining hygiene in neighborhoods where destruction of city infrastructure has led to an absence of basic services. According to an Idleb Press reporter, quoting a volunteer, "It has to be different leadership or another organized system that takes care of social needs and civic services, instead of government systems."

The campaign will run three days a week and volunteers will help to reduce the prevalence of disease caused by the accumulation of garbage in the streets, broken sewer systems and the spread of insects in the city. Not just cleaning streets and filling holes, the volunteers will also create beauty in paintings and murals, trying to raise the spirits of the Moaret Mesrin community.

Idleb Press, the Media Office and media group of Moaret Mesren

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Beautify Moaret Mesrin
Idleb, Syria
By U.S. Editor
09 Apr 2013

Facing difficult daily lives, increasing social needs along with a desire to help others by providing care and services, young people are volunteering with the Revolutionary Civic Council in Moaret Mesrin to implement a new campaign called "Beautify Moaret Mesrin."

The "Beautify Moaret Mesrin" campaign is raising awareness among people about the importance of maintaining hygiene in neighborhoods where destruction of city infrastructure has led to an absence of basic services. According to an Idleb Press reporter, quoting a volunteer, "It has to be different leadership or another organized system that takes care of social needs and civic services, instead of government systems."

The campaign will run three days a week and volunteers will help to reduce the prevalence of disease caused by the accumulation of garbage in the streets, broken sewer systems and the spread of insects in the city. Not just cleaning streets and filling holes, the volunteers will also create beauty in paintings and murals, trying to raise the spirits of the Moaret Mesrin community.

Idleb Press, the Media Office and media group of Moaret Mesren

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Raj Kumar’s fight against social stig...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
04 Apr 2013

Raj Kumar is among many Nepalis who contracted HIV from a dirty needle, and now he is trying to adjust in society and working hard to achieve his long cherished dream, to be a singer. Though Raj Kumar knew that he had HIV in 2004, he didn’t disclose the fact to his wife, out of the fear of ruining his family and being stigmatized by society.
It has been two months since Raj Kumar disclosed the news about his HIV infection to his wife, with much care and counseling.
He took advantage of help of his friends, colleagues and counselors to do the “impossible task,” telling others. Raj Kumar said that he waited for “the right time,” but always “felt heavy with the guilt of hiding it to his wife.” The right moment however, came after nearly a decade. “It was difficult to gather the courage to tell,” he added. “Now I have gathered courage to face it.”
Raj Kumar is now pursuing his childhood dream to be a singer. Raj Kumar’s first song “Mod” was released during a function in Kathmandu on April 29, 2013.

“I was born genius, drugs spoiled me,” Raj Kumar said looking back at his life. When he reached grade eight he got into a habit of using drugs. It was very late that his mother, his primary caretaker, knew about it.

According to government data, an average of 1,437 new infections are reported each year. In 2011, 50,287 people were living with HIV and 3,804 of them are children. Out of the total HIV cases reported in 2011, 87.9 percent were from sexual transmission. The number of new cases of HIV infections has been on decline in the last five years. In 2007, a total of 64,585 people were believed to be living with HIV. Government figures put HIV prevalence in the adult population at 0.3 percent. Only 20,583 HIV cases are reported so far.

Nepal’s first HIV case was reported in 1988. The high-risk group includes intravenous drug users, female sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with other men and male migrant laborers.

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Stuck Between A War & The Turkish Border
Azaz, Syria
By U.S. Editor
03 Apr 2013

In Azaz, Syria, hundreds live in UN tents sprawled across a makeshift transition camp. Though the refugees encamped here fled intense shelling in and around Aleppo, the health hazards in their new homes provide a whole new set of dangers.

Asad Hoammed, who previously worked in a weapons manufacturing facility for the Syrian government, and whose sons now fight with the opposition, is waiting in hopes that his wife may receive medical attention. She needs heart surgery, an operation only possible if they are able to cross into Turkey. Unless they are able to make the crossing soon, she will likely die within days.

Dr. Al-Nasr, who works for a group called “Medical Relief for Syria,” acknowledged that the spread of disease and lack of medical care have created a dire situation. “It’s a problem with sanitation, how to dispose of the bathing water and used toilet water,” he said. “There are lakes of waste in some areas.”

Most of the camp’s water and insect-linked health issues, such as diarrhea and scabies, are treatable. But when addressing complex civilian health emergencies, there’s simply no good option in northern Syria.