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oilrushes
Mayadeen
By David Enders
28 Sep 2017

Shiekh Omar oilfield, shortly after its takeover by rebels fighting the Syrian government in Nov 2012.

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Houthi Militants Close Ibb Butane Sta...
Ibb
By Wahib Mashrah
26 May 2015

Ibb, Yemen
May 26, 2015

Houthi militants in the central Yemeni city of Ibb closed the only station for butane distribution in the city. The measure is an attempt to force provincial authorities to revoke a decision to raise the price of gas.
A Houthi military commander, who introduced himself as Abu Nidal, said that he closed the station because its manager and workers fled and left it unattended. He also explained that the station manager had refused to comply with an order by a Houthi judge to not raise the gas price.
Abu Nidal also said that Houthi militants, who refer to themselves as Ansar Allah, will take over the supervision of gas distribution in the city.

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Thousands Queue Amidst Fuel Shortage ...
Sanaa
By assamawy
03 Apr 2015

The impact of the ongoing war on Yemen's people has now begun to appear in the form of extremely long lines outside of gas stations. Sana'a, which has around 3m people, has suffered from fuel shortages for several months out of the past year. People not only use fuel for cars, but also for home generators since the country has no stable electricity and electricity cuts can last for more than 12 hours a day. As such, people depend mainly on personal generators to lighten the dark nights. Though expensive, the people of Yemeni have no other options.

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Oil Giant Active Amidst Bombing Campaign
shabwah
By Dhaifallah Homran
27 Mar 2015

March 27, 2015
Shabwa, Yemen

00:00 - 01:40
External footage shot on March 27, 2015 of liquefied natural gas plant run in Shebwa

01:41 - 01:59
Archival footage of offices inside's Shebwa's liquefied natural gas plant

B-roll footage of liquefied natural gas plant co-owned by transnational oil giant Total in the province of Shabwa. Though its headquarters in Sanaa have been closed for the time being, the company released a statement saying the Saudi-led bombing campaign has not prevented it from continuing its refining operations.

In early 2015, Houthi militants seized control of the Yemeni capital Sanaa and headed south to the port town of Aden, where President Hadi was hiding. This prompted a Saudi-led coalition to begin a bombing campaign in Yemen.

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015

Sana'a, Yemen
 
The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.
 

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Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas (roug...
Sana'a, Yemen
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015
Sana'a, Yemen

The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.

Transcription

Sound bite, Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"My name is Bashir, I am 15 years old and I am in the ninth grade. Instead of going to school, I wake up and go searching for propane gas with this tank, and this tank has been through all kinds of streets. From street to street and from station to station, I have kicked and pushed this tank with my hands and with my feet".

"I have been searching for gas since seven in the morning; I haven’t eaten breakfast or lunch. I drank water and ate a biscuit from the store and that’s it and continue to search and search for gas in a number of streets and propane gas stations. In this country, you have to search for everything. Nothing comes without struggle. Just like this: this is an example of Yemen. They give you gas like this: drip-by-drip".

"I started my search at seven in the morning and the time now is five pm. After searching for gas in many streets and many stations, I finally found one. I thought I was going to pump gas, so I waited in line until I reached the front."

"I asked the owner how much? And, he replied, ‘1900’ (Yemeni Riyal.) I then told him, “Fear god! The original price is 1200 (Yemeni Riyal) and you want to sell it for 1900?” I tried to plead with him and told him I only have 1200; however, he told me to either pay 1900 or go home. We argued and argued and almost got into a fight. I took my tank and told him all I have with me is 1200."

Sound bite, Kamal Ali Ahamed - Propane Gas Store Owner, (Man, Arabic)
“The cause of gas shortage is due to the low gas production from Safer. The Safer Gas Company fills 39 propane trucks every day; however, there are 1200 propane trucks queuing in line at Safer Company waiting to fill their gas trucks so they can distribute gas throughout the nation. This has led to fewer propane truck deliveries to the Yemeni capital. Because of this, only 150 to 200 propane trucks make deliveries per week. This has led to higher demands for gas in the Yemeni capital, while there are fewer gas deliveries."

"The second reason is there are now more cars which run on propane gas. In 2014, nearly 67 thousand cars that run on gas entered the county. This resulted in a higher demands for gas; however, the gas production in Safer (Mareb province) is only sufficient enough for the use of average households only."

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"No car, no motorbike and no bicycle. I am just like all other Yemenis, I have to kick and push, kick and push from street to street and from gas station to gas station Sometimes, I find a station with propane gas however, there are long lines which reach up to 500 to 600 tanks. When I reach the station, people usually try to cut in line in front of me, which results in heated arguments and sometimes fights. I don’t know what else to do. This is very depressing. The gas problem in Yemen is very depressing."

Sound bite: Abdurahman al-Yemani - Citizen, (Man, Arabic)
“We want a solution to the gas problem; we been waiting in line since the morning. All of us have haven’t ate lunch. The rich people are living comfortably because they have gas; however, we the average workers have to spend all day waiting in line. Will they ever have mercy on us, or are we going to continue living like this?"

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic) "Unfortunately, I am now going home and I don’t know how to tell my mother and father that I couldn’t find gas. What will I tell them, what shall I do?"

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Living Conditions “Extremely Bad” in ...
Jarabulus
By TTM Contributor 34
13 Feb 2015

Jarabulus, Syria
February 13, 2015

This video offers a rare glimpse of daily life in Jarabulus, an ISIS-controlled Syrian town on the border with Turkey, located around 120 km northwest of Aleppo.
Video contains interviews with two anonymous residents who complained about their economic conditions, saying that basic commodities are unaffordable while there are few employment opportunities.

The footage, which was shot secretly, shows what is believed to be ISIS headquarters destroyed by international coalition-led airstrikes. It also shows local residents in markets and agriculture fields inside and near Jarabulus.

Fighters from the Nusra Front, considered the Syrian branch of al-Qaeda, took over the town in 2013 and later pledged allegiance to ISIS. More than 200,000 Kurds and Arabs in Jarabulus and the surrounding villages have lived under ISIS since early 2014.

The name of the contributor has been withheld for security reasons.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Traveling of fields/ road sign “Jarablus”
Wide of destroyed bridge on river
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of destroyed buildings
Wide of ISIS religious teachings
Traveling of street
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of official printed announcements by ISIS posted outside a building/ close up of seal “The Islamic State, Department of Agriculture, Jarabulus District”
L-R pan of field
Wide of children sliding down a hill
Various of boat rowing in the Euphrates River
Wide of planted vegetables
Wide/ L-R pan of orchard
Various of sheep grazing
Close-up of a person cutting firewood
Various of woman cooking using a stove
Various of a woman milking a cow
Various of oil containers for sale on the roadside
Medium of man at fish market
Various of vegetables for sale at market
Wide of field and sheep herd
Traveling of people in an outdoor market
Various of clothes and shoes for sale
Various of spices for sale
Various of market
Various of crowd at market
Various of food items for sale
Wide/ traveling inside health center

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
09:54 – 12:16

“The situation is not good. I cannot say that we are comfortable. Our situation is very bad. A diesel barrel costs 20,000 [Syrian pounds]. How can we afford it? A gas canister costs 4,000 [Syrian pounds] and a liter of kerosene costs 225 pounds. A pack of bread costs 130 pounds. How can we afford this? I have two young men who are unemployed. Where can they go? “The [Islamic] State is good. They have caught the debauched and the thieves who have hurt people, but they provide electricity and water for only two hours [a day]. For more than a year, people have barely seen electricity. It is provided during two hours but the grid is overloaded and the current is interrupted after half an hour. The bakery was not functioning; they repaired it but bread is expensive. We cannot afford it. I bake bread myself.

“As for warplanes… Our houses have been fractured. These countries have formed a coalition against us. We live in a border town. Bombing goes on night and day.

“They should have bombed the tyrant who has deprived us of everything. He has ruined everything. Whenever our children went out to look for work they were accused of being criminals and caught. All our young men have been put in jail. What can we do? The situation is bad.

“We use firewood. We had olive trees but we cut them down and burned them in the stove to have heat in this cold weather.

“I have a cow. Animal feed is expensive. A kilogram of hay costs 50 pounds. A bale of barely that contains 40 kg costs 2,700 pounds. We need this cow to feed us. All the people who have cattle suffer the same crisis that we do. It is not only me; all of us suffer a bad situation. We wish that we die. There is not a single house that has not been fractured due to warplanes.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
12:17 – 13: 19

“Conditions under the Islamic State are extremely bad. Under the Islamic State, a barrel of diesel costs more than $100. A ton of firewood costs 22,000 [pounds]. This crisis has never been witnessed before.

“Nothing has improved under the Islamic State. Everything has deteriorated. They should create employment for the people. The people work in agricultural lands, which do not provide any revenue. We have abandoned our land. Not all the plots are being cultivated. People have cut down olive groves and used them as firewood. The situation is extremely miserable. There are no services and foreign countries are not providing aid. The Islamic State is in control of the situation. Turkey has closed the border and aid cannot reach people. The situation is very bad under the Islamic State.”

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Tabasco's 'Petroleros:' Mexico's Pern...
Nacajuca, Mexico
By jforde89
12 Dec 2014

Oil is everywhere, our way of life depends on that non-renewable resource in a level we could have never imagined. But the "bags of sun" as Carl Sagan called the oil fields are not omnipresent in our world as oil byproducts are. Those zillions of decomposed corpses from millions of years ago only appear at selected spots in the surface of our planet. Sometimes they are found offshore or in deserted areas where no one lives. Other times they appear in densely populated areas, where it's extraction deeply disturbs people's way of life. This is one of those areas. The place where everything started. The water-land where the olmecs, the mother culture of mesoamerica, were already using crude oil for many purposes 3500 years ago.

The economic history of the state of Tabasco, located in southern Mexico, can be resumed in one word: Extraction. One million hectares of lush rainforest were turned into pastures during the logwood and mahogany booms from the 17th century. Cattle were introduced into the cleared areas to make sure the natural ecosystem will not regenerate, and feed the meat markets of Mexico City. In the 70's the prime natural resource of our time made it's grand appearance and the oil boom started.

On average almost 500,000 barrels of high quality oil are extracted each day in Tabasco along with almost 1.5 millions of cubic feet of natural gas, that means 1 barrel for every four inhabitants of the region a day. The Tabasco Shore produces another 300,000 barrels a day. Foreign oil companies have been working in Tabasco for many years. The recent oil reform promoted by president Peña Nieto supposedly will end PEMEX control over Mexico's oil and will turn foreign companies from contractors to shareholders.

The oil region of Tabasco is a densely populated swampy area of around 10,000 square kilometers, known as "La Chontalpa" the land of the Maya-Chontal people. This region was the cradle of civilisation in Mexico and is one of the most diverse regions in the world, culturally and biologically. Most of it's inhabitants remain impoverished and few opportunities are present for young men. Today the local youth dream of becoming a "petrolero" for a chance to earn decent wages, despite the low chances they have of landing a job involving more than cleaning.

Pedro, 17, gets basic cleaning jobs at Poza 123 (Pool 123), if he is lucky donning the signature orange jumpsuit once a month. Julio De La Cruz, a teacher at a primary school in Tapotzingo says that, "None of the people from the surrounding areas have been allowed to enter work on the oil fields other than cleaning, and not one peso has been given back to the communities."

Despite syndicates organized by local leaders to negotiate for a share of the work, most of the labour force contracted by the oil industry is not local. Eliazar Benitez, 65, is originally from Aguascalientes in the centre of Mexico but moved to this area 40 years ago. He has worked with many different companies but all within the oil industry.  

"There are some  120+ oil rigs that sit off the gulf coast with an average of 200-300 people working on each and the workers are mainly foreigners:  Europeans, Japanese, Chinese, Americans and Venezuelans." he said. "They keep the majority of foreign workers off land as not to upset the locals, but you can easily see them when they finish their 28 days on and are flown to land via helicopter. A large percentage end up in local brothels, and it is not unusual to see prostitutes waiting for the workers when they come to land."

The ecological damage caused by oil extraction here has been critical and has generated protests among the rural population since the beggining of the boom. Fish, the natural main source of protein of the region where 40% of the fresh water in Mexico, is now poisoned with heavy metals like mercury, nickel and lead. Patches of oil are omnipresent in the lowlands of the region. 

The Santo Tomas environmental organisation has put in place an oil watch programme they to monitor oil spills on land. However, Hugo Ireta Guzmán, who works with the organization, says that the pollution at sea still poses problems to the local economy. 

"There have been many problems with the local camarones (shrimp)," he said. "Many people used to rely on this as a main source of protein, but now the region imports a lot from other parts of Mexico because of contamination in the sea."

 

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Russia Faces Currency Woes (NSV)
Moscow
By Julia Lyubova
28 Nov 2014

NATURAL SOUND VERSION -- Suggested Script Below

Russia is facing bleak economic prospects as the country's national currency continues to fall. The ruble has already lost almost 30% of its value since June. It plunged some 14% against the US dollar in November alone. The ruble’s devaluation has had an adverse effect on many sectors of the economy.

Western sanctions over the Ukrainian crisis are playing a serious role in Russia's economic woes. The country's Finance Minister recently said that the economy is set to lose 40 billion US dollars per year from sanctions. These punitive measures block Russian companies from borrowing in the West, which could push the country towards a credit crunch.

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Mining the inferno- india's 100-year-...
Jharia, Jharkhand
By adrian
23 Nov 2014

Smoke comes out of a drain along the main road in Jharia, hinting at the alarming levels of underground fires in area. A few years ago, fires damaged the Jharia railway station, leading to its eventual closure.

Activists claim that the mining company in charge of the coal operations are allowing the fires to persist. The company is said to do this because the fires force residents off of their land for safety reasons, thus opening more prospective areas for mining.

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Mining the inferno- india's 100-year-...
Jharia, Jharkhand
By adrian
23 Nov 2014

Miners push around 350 kilograms of on a bicycle up a hillside.

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Mining the inferno- india's 100-year-...
Jharia, Jharkhand
By adrian
23 Nov 2014

A young girl miner observes her colleagues. Many local children are forced to work pilfering coal from state-owned mines in the area.

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Mining the inferno- india's 100-year-...
Jharia, Jharkhand
By adrian
23 Nov 2014

A miner takes a break overlooking the state-run open pit coal mine in Jharia. Miners have to manually carry large loads of coal from the bottom of the mine to the top, where it is delivered for processing.

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Mining the inferno- india's 100-year-...
Jharia, Jharkhand
By adrian
23 Nov 2014

A boy carrying a heavy load of coal over his head in Jharia. Many local children are forced to work pilfering coal from state-owned mines in the area.

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Mining the inferno- india's 100-year-...
Jharia, Jharkhand
By adrian
23 Nov 2014

Miners have to manually carry large loads of coal from the bottom of the mine to the top, where it is delivered for processing.

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Mining the inferno- india's 100-year-...
Jharia, Jharkhand
By adrian
23 Nov 2014

A female miner balances raw coal stones on her head. The work is grueling and harmful to the health of the workers.

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Mining the inferno- india's 100-year-...
Jharia, Jharkhand
By adrian
23 Nov 2014

Smoke from underground fires rise in the state-run open pit mine near Jharia.

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Mining the inferno- india's 100-year-...
Jharia, Jharkhand
By adrian
23 Nov 2014

Miners have to manually carry large loads of coal from the bottom of the mine to the top, where it is delivered for processing.

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Mining the Inferno: India's 100 Year ...
Jharia
By Sanjay Pandey
14 Nov 2014

Roughly 700,000 people live immediately above a series of underground fires that have been smoldering in the town of Jharia for a century, come next year. The government of India is, quite literally, playing with fire.

“State-run coal firm BCCL is deliberately stoking the fire so that they can have more and more of the area declared unsafe to live in and get a broader area in which to continue its mining operations,” says activist Ashok Agarwal of Jharia Coalfield Bachao Samiti, an organization formed by locals to fight the government’s dictatorial policies.

The area is rich in coal and, to cut costs, much of the mining in the area is done by opencast methods. Opencast mining is more profitable than deep mining since the costs of excavation are low and productivity is significantly higher. In Jharia, some 270km from Ranchi, the capital of Jharkhand province, coal is mined everywhere. People armed with shovels dig their way into rat-hole mines near villages and dwellings, roads and even railway tracks.

Bokalpari is one of the many areas affected by the perennial fires in Jharia: no less than 67 have been raging in the belly of the earth. Mining in the area is a source of revenue and livelihood. But with the advent of modern machines, a majority of the manual workforce has become redundant. For villagers like Shamim Khan, mining has become more of a curse. Shamim used to work as driver’s assistant, but is currently unemployed.  

“I haven’t had a job for around 5 years now," he said. "When my forefathers came here decades ago hoping to earn a good living, they left their land and property behind in Bihar. Now, we cannot even go and reclaim that land.”

Coal-seam fires annually spew around 1.4 billion tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, making India the fourth biggest producer of greenhouse gas of the world. In Jharia, mining started back in 1896. After the nationalization of all coalmines in 1971, many were handed over to the state-owned Bharat Coking Coal Limited (BCCL). But the desire to produce cheaper and cheaper coal prompted BCCL to depart from the standard practice of underground or tunnel mining in 1974.

“Coal-seam fires are nothing new in the coal belt. But they became a threat after BCCL opened up the mines,” says Agarwal.

The underground fires in Jharia will be a century old next year, but the government seems to be doing little to douse the flames.

“The BCCL is digging the fire out as part of the master plan,” says T K Lahiri, a managing director of BCCL.

Though mining companies are officially meant to fill abandoned mines with sand, anyone can see that the pits are left unattended. According to local residents, the leftover coal in these pits then comes into contact with oxygen and catches fire. The government’s plan of relocating residents of fire-affected areas has not yet materialized due to resistance from the people and officials’ half-hearted approach to the issue. So far, around 1100 families out of 2500 have been relocated to a township in Belgaria. Those who have moved to the township complain of a lack of basic amenities and job opportunities. This has prompted many to return to their fire-ravaged villages.

“Since there is no source of employment, I have to travel 13km on foot to reach Bokapahari. I know people here so it is easier for me to get a job,” says Shamim, 45, whose two sons have migrated to Delhi where they work as daily wage laborers.

As for those who decided to stay on, a different kind of social problem has emerged. Now, boys and girls living in fire-affected parts of Jharia find it difficult to find a match for themselves. Akhtari Bano, 75, has three marriageable sons and two daughters, but is not able to find anyone suitable for them.  

“It is not that the proposals don’t come at all. But when people come and see that we’re sitting on the lap of a burning fire and that smoke is always emanating from our houses, they run away,” she says. “The government might be having fun playing with fire. But why play with our lives?”

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Gazans Use Propane to Fuel Cars (Shor...
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
05 Nov 2014

Gaza, Palestinian Territories
November 4, 2014

The ongoing Israeli blockade on the Gaza Strip and the recent closure of most the tunnels used for smuggling goods from Egypt has led to a severe fuel shortage. As a result, some Gazans are modifying their car engines and generators to make them run on propane instead of gasoline. Propane is widely used for cooking in Gaza.

Shot list:

00:00 – 00:05
A general shot shows cars driving in both directions on a main road in Gaza City.

00:06 – 00:11
A close shot shows the exhaust pipe of a taxi as it drives away.

00:12 – 00:18
A medium shot shows many parked taxis and men standing and chatting; a female passenger gets out of one of them.

00:19 – 00:20
A medium shot shows a street-food shop.

00:21 – 00:27
A medium shot shows the same street-food shop from a different angle.

00:31- 0:34
A medium shot shows an electric generator running and connected to a gas canister.

00:35 – 01:01
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic/ interview transcript below

01:02 – 01:07
A medium shot shows Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner at work.

01:08- 01:10
A wide shot shows the façade of Daban Company for gas supply.

01:11- 00:14 A medium shot shows two men standing and another around gas canisters.

00:14 – 00:19
A pan right movement shows a man carrying a gas canister.

00: 20 – 00:34
Traveling shot from inside a taxi shows the car stopping to pick up a female passenger.

00:35-01:53
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver/ interview transcript below

01:54 – 02:06
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic/ interview transcript below

02:07 – 02:40
Interview with Ayman Seidam, a mechanic, Arabic/ interview transcript below

02:41- 03:35
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan/ interview transcript below

Interviews

00:35 – 01:01
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic
“Because of the gasoline shortage, you have to use propane to fuel electric generators and carry on with your work… There are power shortages that could last from six to seven hours and the power is on during the night while you cannot work. You have to use any alternative kind of fuel to keep working.”

00:35-01:53
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver
“I altered the car because of the gasoline shortage... In the past, we used to get gasoline through tunnels from Egypt, but they were closed about a year ago, so we switched to propane to save money.”

01:54 – 02:06
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic

-Do you know that this car is running on gas?

-Yes, I know.

-What do you think of that?

-This is normal, because there is no gasoline but [propane] is available.

02:07 – 02:40
Interview with Ayman Seidam, a mechanic, Arabic
“I am disconnecting the filter because I want to set the propane machine. It is not working properly. The propane machine does not change the engine; it only stops the flow of gasoline. Gasoline is expensive here, so people have to switch to using propane. We install a small device to pump propane instead of gasoline into the engine using the injection system. “This is the propane device. It is made in Turkey and called Fima.”

02:41- 03:35
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan, Arabic
“Altering taxis to make them run on propane is against the law, but due to the siege on the Gaza Strip and the large assault against the Palestinian people that comes with it, many taxi drivers are customizing their cars to make them run on propane. It is against the law and the ministry of transportation does allow the installation of propane pipes in cars because it is dangerous… for the passengers. The ministry of transportation, in cooperation with the traffic police, is trying to resolve this problem by monitoring people who buy propane pipes [used in altering vehicles].

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Sample media
Lublewo, Poland 2014
lublewo
By Laura Chiaroni
20 Oct 2014

A gas flare is a combustion device used in oil or gas production sites having wells and rigs. This operation consists in burning off the overproduced gas, which would be too much expensive to stock and transport. Gas flaring has serious environmental consequences and it is a significant source of carbon dioxide (as well as several other carcinogenic substances) emissions.

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Sample media
Cévennes, France 2014
Cévennes
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2014

In July 2011 France was the first European country to pass a law (“Loi Jacob”) banning the technique of hydraulic fracturing for extracting natural gas and oil. The big popular demonstration of Villeneuve de Berg on February 2011 was an important turning point in the cancellation of the first exploration permits within the Cévennes National Park area and towards the national moratorium on hydraulic fracturing.

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Sample media
Karmin, Poland 2014
karmin
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2014

Fracking operations produce loud noises and need a stable and strong illumination, even at night. When drilling sites lie a short distance away from houses and villages, the lives of the inhabitants suffer significant difficulties.

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Sample media
Miłowo, Poland 2014
milowo
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2014

Deforestation caused by test extractions of shale gas in Milowo, northern Poland.

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Sample media
Lubocino, Poland 2014
lubocino
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2014

A PGNiG worker is verifying the progress of excavation in the fracking site of Lubocino, northern Poland.

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Sample media
Baraniec, Poland 2014
baraniec
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Sep 2014

A rig used for shale gas extractions by FX Energy, an American oil company.

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Sample media
Aujac, France 2014
Aujac
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Aug 2014

André Agniel, former Mayor of Aujac from 2001 to 2014, poses next to the Rue Josh Fox plate. This street has been named after the young American director and activist Josh Fox, author of Gasland. In 2010 this documentary was the first and the most important testimony against fracking that led to the creation of several protest movements all over the world. Rue Josh Fox was inaugurated on the 29th of May 2014.

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Sample media
Rome, Italy 2014
rome
By Laura Chiaroni
01 Aug 2014

ENI headquarters. In 2010 the Italian oil company ENI (Ente Nazionale Idrocarburi) obtained three licenses for shale gas exploitation in Poland. After less than four years, the company was among the first ones to give up all of its polish shale gas permits because of tough geology and an unclear regulatory environment.

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Yemenis Block-off Main Roads and Burn...
Sana'a
By Yousef Mawry
30 Jul 2014

July 30, 2014
Sana'a, Yemen

Hundreds of Yemenis blocked off main roads and burned tires, in a number of Yemeni provinces, in protest against the latest price-hike of petroleum products, which came into effect on the third day of the Eid al-Fitr holiday.

On Wednesday morning the prices of fuel had increased from 2,500 to 4,000 Yemeni riyals ($11.6 to $18.6) for 20 liters. The price of diesel also increased from 2000 to 3,900 riyals.
Yemen is considered to be the poorest country in the Middle East with nearly half of its population living in severe poverty.

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Sample media
Bruxelles, Belgium 2014
bruxelles
By Laura Chiaroni
05 Jun 2014

A Chevron billboard inside the central railway station in Bruxelles. In June 2014, the Belgian capital has hosted the G8 summit about clean energy and climate change

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Mining the inferno- india's 100-year-...
Jharia, Jharkhand
By adrian
18 Mar 2014

A coal fire rages in an open coal mine in Jharia, India.

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Andrea's family
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Mar 2014

Andrea is eating lunch with her mother and her father. She says she doesn't know if she will stay in Pungesti when she grows older. She thinks there is no future in Pungesti if Chevron continues its fracking activities because it will destroy the area's natural resources. The majority of villagers in Pungesti are farmers who depend on agriculture to survive.

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Andrea's family
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Mar 2014

Andrea is eating lunch with her mother and her father. They took part in protests against Chevron. Police officers are constantly patrolling outside their house.

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Teenagers on the main square
By Ulrik Pedersen
11 Mar 2014

Two teenagers sitting on the main square, in front of a local shop. Unemployment is a plague in Pungesti. Most people have nothing to do besides hanging out around the bar and shops.

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Carriage
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

A man on a carriage going through the village's main square. Pungesti is one of Romania's poorest villages. It lacks basic infrastructures such as paved roads.

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Children playing
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

Two girls playing on the village's main road which also passes by Chevron's compound. Pungesti, Romania.

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Youth's hopeless future
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

Pungesti's villagers say environmental impact of fracking is jeopodizing the future of villages like Pungesti. Many young people are already forced to leave the village and go to Western Romania to find work.

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Pungesti child
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

Lack of opportunities and poverty is forcing the youth to leave Pungesti. Even education is difficult to access. Children who want to pursue their education after 9th grade are forced to go to school loated 37 kilometers away from Pungesti.

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angry man
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

This poor farmer says there is no point in fighting Chevron and the Romanian government because Pungesti's resident will remain poor no matter what happens.