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Jamdani Sari 16
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
13 Jun 2015

A model shows off a Bangladeshi traditional Jamdani Sari in Dhaka on 13 June 2015 when the Intellectual Property Association of Bangladesh (IPAB) celebrated the Jamdani Sari being recognized as an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

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Child Labour in Our World
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
11 Jun 2015

It may sound like old news to some, but one of the scary realities of our world is that some of the biggest problems facing humanity occur without explosions, protests, or big news headlines. Often, those who suffer the most suffer in silence, far away from the eyes of news cameras and the international community.

Child Labour is one of those problems that passes largely unnoticed. All over the world, across cultural, social, and religious divides, child labour persists. Sometimes it occurs as the simple act of a well-intended parent taking their child to work in the farm fields by their side. Other times, it is malicious factory owners using children as cheap labour in their factory, where they are abused and underpaid.

What makes the issue more complicated is that child labour can occur in front of our eyes, without us noticing. Sometimes understanding child labour is understanding what is not visible to us. It is understanding that a working child is not attending school, that a working child is malnourished, and that a working child is physically and psychologically abused. The difference between a child helping their mother in the family shop and child exploitation could be the simple question of whether or not the child’s work is preventing them from attending school. The line can sometimes be fine and other times glaring.

At Transterra Media, our contributors have documented child labour around the world for years, from the brick factories of Bangladesh, to the garbage piles of Cambodia, and the car repair shops of Syria. Our contributors have shed a small amount of light on a massive issue that the world is still trying to address.

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Kenya's Sengwer Tribe Faces Eviction ...
Embobut, Kenya
By danubestory
06 Mar 2015

Embobut, Kenya
March 6, 2015

The Sengwer, a tribe of hunter-gatherers and beekeepers who also keep livestock, have lived in Cherangany mountains in Kenya - land they consider sacred - for centuries. Today, they face eviction from their ancestral lands. Approximately 12,000 people were told to move from the forest area to make way for a nature conservation and reforestation project financed by the Kenyan government and the World Bank. The Sengwer, however, pride themselves for their traditional methods for preserving their heritage lands. When they refused, forest guards began burning down their houses.

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Thailand: A Solar-Powered Path to Dev...
Mae Sot, Thailand
By Ana Salvá
09 Dec 2014

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

Access to electricity is a key element in development. However, in Thailand there is an important gap in access to energy between rich and poor that has persisted over the years, especially in rural areas. The situation is critical in some marginal areas, such as the Thai-Burma border.

The lack of electricity makes these communities more vulnerable. In these areas, some villagers depend on candles or kerosene lamps that are very expensive and have a negative impact on their health. They also pose serious risks to their livelihoods since their homes are usually constructed with bamboo and dried leaves that can easily catch fire. On the other hand, these communities must gather wood in order to satisfy their most basic needs, tasks that are normally carried out by women, cutting into the time and energy they could devote to other economic activities. Moreover, some schools and hospitals do not have access to power for needs as basic as keeping vaccines refrigerated.

The Thai government implemented solar energy systems in more than 200.000 households in 2004. However, most of the systems died because of the lack of maintenance. In this context, a Thai woman founded an organization to refurbish the old equipment and to train local people on how to maintain it. Her project aims to be self-sustainable. If successful, it could bring some much needed relief to families who currently struggle to meet their energy needs.

An American's Struggle to Save Africa...
Nairobi
By Antonella Palmieri
30 Nov 2014

In Kenya, there is a bitter struggle between Chinese development investments and an American citizen eager to protect a famous house on the edge of the Kenyan savannah dedicated to preserving African heritage. The house has appeared on dozens of magazine covers around the world and now is threatened of disappearing.

For months Alan Donovan, 70, a lifetime to turn Africa collecting art, is fighting to prevent the "African heritage house" from being demolished and give way to the new railway line that will connect the capital Nairobi to the Mombasa port in the southeast.

For ten years, the house has hosted tourists from all over the world who visit it as if it were a museum. Its six thousand artworks whose total value is around $200,000. The African Heritage House was built in 2004 modeled on the mud architecture that resembles the Great Mosque of Djenné in Mali. Painted walls in the living room on the third floor of the house are a reminiscent of the Ghanian Kasena tribe.

The house is located about 10 kilometres from the capital, on the edge of the Nairobi National Park. It became famous worldwide as the largest furniture magazines in the world, from France to Australia and from the US to Brazil published pictures of the rooms, chairs and paintings. It was soon turned into "the most photographed house in Africa" and saw the arrival of many intrigued tourists.

Now, seeking to renew its infrastructure, Kenya signed a $2.6 billion deal with the Chinese government to replace the railway built by Queen Victoria at the end of 1800s - and its slow trains that still travels at a speed of 40 kilometres per hour.

In its place the new railway that will be built by the Chinese company China Road and Bridge Corporation (CRBC) to connect Nairobi to Mombasa, and will allow goods to arrive more quickly from the port to the countryside.

Born in the United States, Donovan arrived for the first time in Africa in 1967 when he worked for an NGO during the civil war in Nigeria.

"Back then I saw a lot of corruption in the aid machine, so I decided to leave and start traveling all over the continent," he said, "to Congo, Ghana, Tanzania and finally Kenya."

When he arrived in Nairobi he met the then Vice-President Joseph Murumbi, an event that would change his life. Together they opened an art gallery in a Nairobi teeming with vitality.

Wealthy adventurers in search for strong experiences in the savannah to tell stories to friends once back home; entrepreneurs ready to exploit the tourism business on the coast; as well as artists, musicians, sculptors and painters all flocked to the gallery. Donovan created unique jewelry using beads and animal bones and has hosted the works of dozens of artists from around the continent. Murumbi is still remembered as the greatest ever Pan-African art dealer.

Then came the 1990s. African artwork lost its charm, and Nairobi saw terrorist attacks against the US Embassy in 1998. The gallery suffered with its coffers increasingly empty.

"When Murumbi died in 1990 I kept the gallery moving, but I could not give it the same vitality," Donavan said. "In 2003, I declared bankruptcy, and in 2004 I opened this house putting in it many of the works that we had in the gallery."

Donovan is not alone in his fight to preserve the house. Thousands of people have already signed online petitions, and the Kenyan Ministry of Culture has undertaken to save it. If they fail, in a few years this house will most likely no longer exist.

Living in Kenya for over 40 years, Donovan has seen the progress changing the face of Africa, and now it may take away his home, a place that represent all his life while paying tribute to the achievements of African art.

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Thai Tsunami Survivors Face Eviction ...
Phuket
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

When a tsunami ravaged the shores of the Indian Ocean in 2004, the mangrove forest surrounding the Muslim village of Baan Nai Rai, in the province of Phang-Nga, saved most of its inhabitants even if it was one of the hardest hit areas in Thailand. Few months later, a company claimed the land where they have always lived and now plans to turn the area into a tourist resort. More than 100 people have already been displaced and 600 resist to be moved. But, above all, villagers want to protect the mangrove forest, an area that, according to Thai law, should be considered public land.

“I mainly fight for the mangrove area”, says Anun Poung Sa Nguan, a 54 year-old fisherman who has lived in the village for 30 years. “Without the mangroves, we would have to go too far away to catch the fish, because now they grow here."

“We worked very hard to take care of the mangroves, even before the tsunami," says Duk, one of the leaders of the village. We depend on them."

According to a research published by the Prince of Songkla University, the Baan Nai Rai community played a key factor in the reforestation, cultivation, protection and rehabilitation of the post-tsunami mangrove forest. Mangroves are considered an important factor for climate change adaptation and mitigation in coastal areas, especially in poor communities.

The villagers filed a lawsuit against the company but a tribunal considered in 2013 that the land was rightfully belonging to the company.

“I think this [property] document has been wrongfully obtained. This land should be public according to the law”, says Suttipong Laithip, a volunteer lawyer who is helping the villagers with the legal procedures against the company.

The Baan Nai Rai community is now trying to find additional evidences to bring again the case in court. After the 2004 tsunami, that killed more than 220.000 people in a dozen countries – 8000 of them in Thailand - the tourism sector has rapidly grown in the Phang-Nga province, where at least 14 villages were engaged in land and tenure disputes with the government and private companies one year after the disaster, according to a report from Human Rights Watch.

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Myanmar: A Yangon River Ferry's Last Day
Yangon
By Raw Music International
12 Nov 2014

As Myanmar begins seeing sanctions against it lifted, foreign firms, including a Japanese company whose ferryboats will replace the old boats that until recently criss-crossed the Yangon River, have begun vying to open markets in the country, bringing with them the changes to everyday life that come with the influx of new goods and services.

Traffic sits static in the swelteringly damp heat of Yangon’s streets, filling the air with fumes. Noodle stalls, tea stalls, clothes stalls, nick-nack stalls and finally, pedestrians pack sidewalks to the edge, the pavements stained red from the constant spitting of Betel-nut juice. Sprays of blood-red saliva spurt from taxi windows and the mouth of every other Betel chewer on the street. The soundtrack is a constant ring of shouts, calls, coughs, engines and around dawn and dusk, the cawing of crows. However, despite the chaos, the investment and development brought to the city in recent years is obvious. Encouraged by apparent moves towards democracy, foreign companies have begun to see Myanmar as viable and potentially lucrative option. Yangon feels like a place where things are changing.

Not far outside of Yangon things don’t move so fast. The ferry crossing the river between the city and the semi-rural township of Dala is packed all day with commuters, traders and labourers who rely on the crossing to access work in Yangon. Like tens of thousands of other Burmese they leave underdeveloped townships and head to the former capital each day to make their living.

This video, filmed on the last days the two decrepit ferries would operate before being replaced by newer boats, puts forward small aspects of Burmese daily life that speak to wider changes occurring in the country.

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Paraguay's Garbage Dump Orchestra
Catuera
By foschiceleste
31 Oct 2014

FULL ARTICLE IN ENGLISH UPON REQUEST
ARTICLE COMPLET EN FRANÇAIS DISPONIBLE

Catuera is home to the largest landfill in Asuncion, the capital of Paraguay. Here, a young orchestra defies all odds, making their instruments from garbage. Despite the extreme poverty in which most residents of Catuera live - in cardboard, wood and sheet-metal shanties and exposed to numerous health and safety hazards - this orchestra allows young people from eight to twenty-two years-old to access culture and also to improve the living conditions of their families. This may well prove that the trash of some is treasure to others.

The project began in 2006 when Favio Chevez Morán, an environmental engineer and music afficianado working in the neighborhood, began to teach music to the youth of Cateura with the help of Nicolás Gómez (known to locals as Don Cola), a recycler who makes instruments out of trash, and a young French volunteer. There are parallels here between recycler and artist. Both seek something in the trash to give it new significance, new life. Little by little, their efforts transformed informal music classes into a long-term project: an orchestra, a new challenge for these young people.

The project’s success led the American heavy-metal group Metallica to invite the orchestra to join them on their South American tour this year. Since then, they have played more and more concerts, sharing a unique musical experience in Paraguay as well as Germany, Spain, Austria and countries around the world.


L'Orchestre des Instruments Recyclés de Cateura, Paraguay


A Cateura, le décharge plus grande d’Asunción, la Capitale du Paraguay, une orchestre défi les limites de l’impossible en faisant ses instruments à partir de déchets. Même si la plupart des habitants vit en situation d’extrême pauvreté, dans des maisons en carton, en bois et en tôle, exposés à de nombreux dangers, cet orchestre a permis aux jeunes de 8 a 22 ans d'accéder à la culture et aussi d'améliorer les conditions de vie de ses familles. Cela prouve que les déchets des uns peuvent être la richesse des autres.

Ce projet commence en 2006 quand Favio Chavez Morán, un technicien environnemental amateur de musique qui travaille dans ce quartier défavorisé, commence à enseigner la musique aux enfants et aux jeunes de Cateura, aidé par Nicolás Gómez (alias Don Cola), un recycleur, qui fabrique les instruments avec les ordures et un jeune volontaire français qui collabore avec l'organisation. De cette manière, on peut dire qu’il y a des parallèles entre un recycleur et un artiste, ils cherchent des choses dans les ordures pour leur donner une nouvelle signification, une valeur différente. Peu à peu, avec l'effort et le travail de tous, les classes de musique sont devenues un projet à long terme: un orchestre. Et aussi un nouveau défi pour ces jeunes.

Le succès a commencé avec l’invitation de Metallica à participer à la tournée de concerts en Amérique du Sud cette année. Depuis lors, les concerts sont de plus en plus nombreux, au Paraguay comme à l'étranger, en Allemagne, en Espagne, en Autriche, ils parcourent différents pays et transmettent cette expérience unique.

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Poisoning water
Mae Toen
By Ana Salvá
14 Aug 2014

Mae Toen is a small rural village located in the province of Lampang, 500 kilometres away from Bangkok. The village is close to a fluoride mine, and despite its closure 40 years ago, the nearby artificial lake where the water overflows during the rainy season has become polluted.

Having no other water supply, people of Mae Toen turned to the polluted lake for their needs. Three generations later, the village is still very sick and the symptoms can be seen – children may experience brain damage, deaf-mutism or slow brain development, while some of the older women have an enlarged thyroid gland on their necks, as did their parents before them.

"The problem we have is that in Mae Toen, the groundwater is used for eating and cooking, and this is contaminated with excessive amounts of fluoride," says Dr. Chatpat Kongpun, who works at the Ministry of Public Health Thailand. "Some of the younger generation still suffer health problems, but their problems are not as severe as those of the older people," he says.

Da, 64, works as a housekeeper in Mae Toen. She grew up with the habit of drinking from the lake, and when she was 34, she developed thyroid problems that have stayed with her all her life. Despite the awfully uncomfortable looking swelling in her throat, a condition called goiter, she still manages to work and spend time with her family.

"I have thyroid problems since some time ago, and I have become accustomed to it,” she says. I can work at home and it doesn’t hurt. I can go everywhere around the village.”

When her lump appeared, Da didn’t give it too much thought. She didn’t bother to go to the doctor because she already knew what was going on. When she was younger, she had seen a similar swelling on her mother's neck and the necks of other older villagers who had also drunk from the lake.

"My mother had the same lump as mine but smaller," Da says. "For the last 20 years the lump hasn’t grown. The doctor told me that they can remove it, but I won’t. I am weak and I could bleed to death."

In Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries, the shortage of drinking water is a serious problem because it usually rains only in the monsoon season between May and October, making it not sufficient to supply people’s needs.

In 2003, the Rotary Club of D'Entracasteaux of Tasmania, Australia, mobilised to help solve the problems caused by fluoride in Mae Toen, introducing a water tank supply which provided the villagers with receptacles to store the rainwater.

Officially, nobody drinks from the lake anymore, but the supply may not be enough to get people through the dry season. “About 50 percent of pregnant women [still] suffered from iodine deficiency when I worked in the village last year”, said Pornithida Padthong, who was head of communications at UNICEF Thailand until 2013 and worked in Mae Toen, suggesting that people in the village may still risk drinking contaminated water today.

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World Cup Legacy in Porto Alegre
Porto Alegre, Brazil
By Roberta Scherer
09 Jul 2014

Even close to its end, the World Cup still impacts the Brazilian people. The removals that happened for the construction of stadiums, enlargement of roads and airports are still a subject of discussion. A lot of Brazilians are still affected by the measures taken for the realization of the event.
Many popular movements united and founded the World Cup popular committees. These comities intend to promote discussion and a bigger involvement on subjects related to urban renovations, exploitation of labor and temporary measures related to the competition. Cláudia Fávaro, one of the founders of the Committee in Porto Alegre, says that the biggest concern about the removals is that, according to her, they are being held improperly.
A typical case is that of the inhabitants of the Vila Dique, close to Salgado Filho International Airport, in Porto Alegre. Part of the community was removed for the enlargement of the airstrip. A significant part of the dwellers are collectors of recycled material and the new homes they were offered are in apartments in a building, making their task harder. However, the biggest problem is related to the structure of the new residences, because they do not have enough public infrastructures to shelter 1.4 thousand families. According to the inhabitants, they do not have health centers or schools to put their children. All the public infrastructure has currently been transferred and the population that still lives in Vila Dique is completely unassisted, feeling obligated to move.
Despite the removals, the renovations planned to enlarge the runway have not been finished. According to Cláudia Favaro, a study made after the removals says that the ground is a wetland, making it impossible to build the runway.

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Lebanese Fisherman Battle Pollution a...
Sidon, Beirut, Lebanon
By David Shaw
30 Jun 2014

July, 2014
Lebanon

Lebanon's coastline has been a vital part of sustaining lives for thousands of years. However, in recent years, it has become unproductive as a means of subsistence due to privatization and pollution. Local fishermen of many different religions and backgrounds still attempt to scrape a living despite the depleted fish sources and pressure to move away by big business and government.

The Daliyeh, one of the last public spaces left in Beirut, contains the Daliyeh Marina, a small but fully working fishing port which provides a work base for an estimated 60-70 fisherman. The marina is under serious threat of permanent destruction due a hotel project that is due to be built on the Daliyeh rock. The project is funded by the Hariri family, one of the most economically and politically powerful families in Lebanon. The hotel would result in a significant loss to the fishermen and their families who have been working in this area their whole lives. The proposed project would also destroy one of the last places that the local Lebanese can use as a beach for leisure.

The loss of the marina isn't the only pressing issue that is affecting the livelihoods of these men and the families they support. Most of Lebanon's solid waste is deposited in landfills which border the coast, slowly leaking pollution into the ocean. Many fishermen admit that they sometimes purposely salvage large pieces of metal to sell as scrap. The sewers also deposit straight into the Mediterranean, usually completely untreated and containing industrial waste from factories.

Perhaps one of the biggest problems is overfishing. The use of illegal nets, which are used even during the spawning seasons, are having a devastating effect on the fish population, threatening to put many fisherman out of work. Each fishing community seems to have a different viewpoint on managing overfishing in Lebanon; any rules in place are not strictly enforced. Illegal fishing is a product of desperation due to the hardship these fishermen are facing as they continue to work in what appears to be a doomed profession. They often earn as little as $30 US Dollars a day which means that what they catch is often what they and their families eat. Many of the fishermen have no training or skills in any other potential occupation, so they will press on despite the many problems they face. “Fishing is all I know”, Says Hamzi Khalil, 63, “We fish, we eat. We don’t fish – we don’t eat.”

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Typhoon Haiyan 12
By Javier Triana
04 May 2014

The house of the Libutar family was washed away by Super Typhoon Haiyan, half a year ago. They now live under a bridge.

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Typhoon Haiyan 13
By Javier Triana
04 May 2014

The house of the Libutar family was washed away by Super Typhoon Haiyan, half a year ago. They now live under a bridge.

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Typhoon Haiyan 14
By Javier Triana
04 May 2014

The house of the Libutar family was washed away by Super Typhoon Haiyan, half a year ago. They now live under a bridge.

In Tacloban, 490.000 houses were destroyed by the typhoon and over 200.000 families haven't received enough aid to build a safe and durable home. Up to 500 000 people are living in areas where there is a high risk of natural disaster.

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Typhoon Haiyan 16
By Javier Triana
04 May 2014

The house of the Libutar family was washed away by Super Typhoon Haiyan, half a year ago. They now live under a bridge.
According to the mayor of Tacloban, 65 000 to 75 000 people living areas where there is a high risk of natural disasters are waiting to be relocated.

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In Akkar 1
Halba, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
10 Jan 2014

The first barrier for Syrian education is language: “Syrian children - especially those above 12 years old- face challenges as they would be completely adapted to the Syrian curriculum- when studying the Lebanese curriculum. In Syria, all subjects are taught in Arabic while either French or English are the language of instruction in Lebanon”, explains Aseel Jammal Caballero, from UNHCR. In the camp, young children learn very fast, according to their French and English volunteer teachers. But the older ones usually have to help adults to work, in construction for boys, nurse or couture for girls.

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In Akkar 9
halba, lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
10 Jan 2014

“Most of the children had to walk for more than 15km under the bombing of Assad’s regime from Qusayr to Arsal, in Lebanon”, explains Friedrich Bokern, founder of Relief&Reconciliation.

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In Akkar 6
halba, lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
10 Jan 2014

Mustapha was a teacher in Qusayr. Long enough to design books and exercise books for the children of the camp. Here, Syrians did not wait for NGO’s: since they arrived in Lebanon two years ago, they built two school classes in the camp. All their children get up at 8 am to sing their lesson in Arabic or memorize mathematic rules.

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Swimmers Without Borders 10
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

A girl from a private school during a swimming lesson in Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club (Kenya). Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor, as lessons are expensive and the country holds very few facilities.

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Swimmers Without Borders 16
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson in Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club (Kenya).

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Swimmers Without Borders 08
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 05
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 12
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 03
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 07
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 09
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 11
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 06
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 14
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 02
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 01
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 04
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Swimmers Without Borders 15
By Javier Triana
17 Oct 2013

Children from a private school during a swimming lesson at Nairobi's exclusive Impala Club. Only privileged children can learn how to swim with a proper instructor. Lessons are expensive the country holds very few facilities. As a result, thousands of people from Sub-Saharan Africa die from drowning every year.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
22 Sep 2013

L’uranium nigérien permet d’éclairer une ampoule française sur trois, tandis que seul un Nigérien sur dix a accès à l’électricité. Le 20 septembre, l’Etat sahélien a lancé un audit des mines d’uranium détenues par Areva, afin que l’exploitation du minerai contribue d’avantage à son développement.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 12
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

A shack that serves dinner is announced by a neon light above a row of cooking put full of rice and leaf sauce. Here, Malian migrants after the night meal, Niamey.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 3
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

After the night’s prayer, reading of Koran under the white neon of a shop, Niamey.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 13
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

In front of his shop where he sells cigarettes and tea, Ibrahim tells time with small swallow of sweet green tea.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 8
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

A family sat down for a diner on a laterite road, shined by a torch made in China. Yantala, Niamey.