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Dripping Gold: On the Hunt for Honey ...
Marigat
By Berta Tilmantaite
05 Mar 2016

“This is my bank” says 53-year-old Agnes Cheptepkeny and motions towards her small tin house where two of the rooms from floor to ceiling are filled with bucketfuls of honey. “When I have money, I buy honey. This is how I save up. And when I need cash, I can sell a bucket or two” tells A. Cheptepkeny, whose one bucket of honey is worth around 80 Euros.

This woman lives in a town of Marigat, located in the Rift valley, Baringo County. This place is a home for people of Tugen, Ilchamus, and Pokot tribes which are known for their beekeeping and good quality honey. A. Cheptepkeny is from Tugen tribe and has been selling honey for quite some time.

Kenya is not very famous for its honey. Ethiopia and Tanzania are places where the biggest amount of this liquid gold is being collected. On the other hand, Kenya’s nature is the same as in the previously stated countries, so there is definitely a potential for successful beekeeping and honey export, although slow adaptation of new technologies, lack of knowledge, small interest of younger generations, parasites and pesticides used in agriculture, climate change, an unorganized market, and undeveloped infrastructure are the main issues that encumber this activity.

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Honey in Kenya 13
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) together with his wife is working as a shoemaker in Marigat town Kenya. When bee hives are full, he also goes to harvest honey and sell it to add to family's budget.

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Honey in Kenya 14
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) in her room, fully stacked with buckets of honey.

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Honey in Kenya 15
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
28 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) is calling a motorbike driver, to come to her house and help to take a bucket of honey to the market.

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Honey in Kenya 01
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) is firing up a bunch of sticks that he is later going to use to smoke the bees away from the beehive in Marigat, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 02
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) is harvesting the honey from his beehive hanging high up in the tree in Marigat, Kenya.

People produce honey for consumption, because it's high in energy. It is also used as sweetener and as a medicine. The honey and the beeswax is also sold to earn some extra money. In some places it is still used to pay dowries for the bride.

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Honey in Kenya 08
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) prepares to climb a tree with a bucket and fire to harvest honey in Marigat, Kenya.

"This year a lot of beehives are empty because of the draught," says Philip. He works as a shoemaker in the town, but also has a few beehives and harvests honey to add some money to the family budget.

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Honey in Kenya 03
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41), Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) and Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) are checking freshly harvested honey combs in Marigat, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 04
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Philip Kipyertor (41) and Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) are walking around the trees and checking their beehives in Marigat, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 05
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) and her son are processing the honey in Marigat market, Kenya.

"This is my bank," says Agnes, pointing to honey buckets. Anytime she has cash, she buys honey, processes it and sells to make a living.

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Honey in Kenya 06
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Honey is processed in Marigat market, Kenya. Marigat is a fast-growing town located in the Rift Valley, Baringo County. This area is home to the Tugen, Njemps and Pokot communities, famous for their honey.

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Honey in Kenya 07
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) waits for customers by her honey kiosk in Marigat market, Kenya. Agnes makes her living from honey and even started a certification process. Once her product is tested and confirmed to meet quality standards, she can label her honey jars and start to distribute it to markets and export it to other countries.

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Honey in Kenya 09
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53) is trying a freshly harvested honey, that Philip Kipyertor (41) and Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) brought to her in Marigat market, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 10
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Agnes Cheptepkeny (53), Philip Kipyertor (41) and Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) taste a freshly harvested honey in Marigat market, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 11
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

Marigat town and market along the road, Kenya.

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Honey in Kenya 12
Marigat, Kenya
By Berta Tilmantaite
27 Oct 2015

An old traditional log bee hive in the garden where Philip Kipyertor (41) and Joseph Kipkoshoni (70) go to harvest honey.

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Bangladesh's Jamdani Sari
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
08 Jul 2015

In December 2013, the Intellectual Property Association of Bangladesh (IPAB) celebrated a major success as Bangladesh's Jamdani Sari weaving tradition, a labor-intensive and time-consuming form of hand loom weaving is recognized as Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District.

A sari is the traditional garment worn by women in the Indian subcontinent, made up of a long strip of unstitched cloth, ranging from five to nine yards in length, which can be draped in various styles. The most common style is for the sari to be wrapped around the waist with one end then draped over the shoulders with the other. The Jamdani Sari is among the oldest styles, at more than 5,000 years old! Some people think that the sari was influenced by Greek or Roman toga, which we see on ancient statues. However, there is no solid historical evidence to this effect.

The sari is essentially designed to suit local conditions in the subcontinent. There are at least six varieties of Bengal handlooms, each deriving its name from the village in which it originated, and each with its own distinctive style. Dhaka was especially renowed for saris of fine muslin, a tradtion that carries on today. Jamdani is basically a transformation of the world famous Dhakai Muslin. According to their variety, fineness and patterns the traditional Dhakai Muslins were divided into specific categories. Among them, Aab-E-Rouhan, Shabnam, Sarband and Jamdani muslin were the most famous. Over the years the first three of these have vanished from history.

The production, marketing and export of Jamdani has somehow maintained its continuity. Dhaka has a history of only four hundred years from 1610 A.D., but the history of the cotton clothes of the region reveals more ancient traditions. Although most of the history of Jamdani weaving os lost in the mists of antiquity, it's known that trade in the fabric was established at least 2,000 years ago.

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Jamdani Sari 01
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 02
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 03
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 04
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 05
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

Portrait of a Bangladeshi weaver of Jamdani Saris in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 06
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 07
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

Portrait of a Bangladeshi weaver of Jamdani Saris in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 08
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 09
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A whole saller of Jamdani Saris shows a piece from his collection in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

Jamdani Saris are made from the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 11
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A whole saller of Jamdani Saris shows a piece from his collection in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 12
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 17
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 18
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 19
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 20
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 21
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 23
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 24
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 25
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
07 Jul 2015

A Bangladeshi weaver designs a Jamdani Sari in the village of Rupganj Thana in the outskirts of Dhaka.

Jamdani is the finest Muslin textile produced in Bangladesh's Dhaka District. This time consuming and labor-intensive form of hand loom weaving has been declared intagible cultural world heritage by UNESCO.

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Jamdani Sari 14
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
13 Jun 2015

A model shows off a Bangladeshi traditional Jamdani Sari in Dhaka on 13 June 2015 when the Intellectual Property Association of Bangladesh (IPAB) celebrated the Jamdani Sari being recognized as an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

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Jamdani Sari 15
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
13 Jun 2015

A model shows off a Bangladeshi traditional Jamdani Sari in Dhaka on 13 June 2015 when the Intellectual Property Association of Bangladesh (IPAB) celebrated the Jamdani Sari being recognized as an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.