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Asylum Seekers in Spain 29
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

10-year-old Anatoliy Eliseev, from Uzbekistan, does his homework, while his mother Nina does the laundry at home in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva, 33, arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by her ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing the scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 30
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, and her son Anatoliy, 10, are leaving their home, in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 31
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, with her son Anatoliy, 10, walk around their neighborhood, in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 33
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, travels by subway in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 32
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, does her shopping in a supermarket in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 34
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, enters to a Metro station after doing her shopping in a supermarket in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 35
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, travels by subway in Barcelona, Spain, after doing her shopping.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 36
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, travels by subway in Barcelona, Spain, after doing her shopping.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 37
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, arrives at home in Barcelona, Spain, with her shopping.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 39
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, arrives at home in Barcelona, Spain, with her shopping.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 40
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, does her laundry at home in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by her ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 41
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, walks in Barcelona city center, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by her ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 38
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, and her son Anatoliy, 10, wait to start a music concert in Centre Civic Drassanes, in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 42
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, and her son Anatoliy, 10, wait for the start of a music concert in Centre Civic Drassanes, in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 43
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, meets her brother Ivan at his bar in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 02
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

Despite the fact that Uloq should traditionally be played in spring or autumn, horsemen like to play on fresh snow - it's safer when you fall from a horse.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 03
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

A big round target marks the finish line where the winning rider is supposed to lay the carcass - without getting it stolen from him by other riders with whips clenched in their teeth and horses trained to bite.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 04
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

The jury consists of respected people (aksakals) who inspect horsemen, the carcass and monitor the game to make sure it goes on according to the rules.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 05
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

The jury will grant the winner a prize: it can be anything from a horse or carpet to a TV or even a car.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 06
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

Spectators enjoy alcoholic beverages while braving the cold to watch the game. Their drinks of choice: vodka and cheap local wine called "Porto 53."

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 08
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

Riders who become too tired to carry on or who are injured can leave the game at any time.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 09
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

The hoard of riders waits for a signal from the jury that marks the beginning of the game.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 10
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

Uloq fans are often criticized for drinking and bad behavior.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 11
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

Fans wait in line to enter the massive field where the game will take place in Ertosh.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 12
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

While men ride horses into the game, children and young boys ride donkeys.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 13
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

Riders try to wear warm clothes made of thick layers of cotton to prevent injuries from horses and other riders.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 14
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

A carcass used for the game should first be beheaded. A regulation carcass weighs between 30 and 40 kg.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 17
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

A game of Uloq has just begun before a packed audience in Ertosh, Uzbekistan.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 16
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

Spectators try to find elevated places to have a good view on the game.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 18
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

Riders are allowed to whip each other. They often hold their whips in their mouths while trying to control their horses with both hands.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 15
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

Riders are not allowed to attack each other from the back, but all other kinds of physical attack are permitted.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 19
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

Bizarrely and painfully, it is allowed for horses to bite riders and other horses. Riders often train their horses to perform such a trick on command.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 21
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

Riders customarily pray before the start of the game.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 20
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

One lucky rider (left) wears a Soviet tank brigadier helmet to the game. It's considered the best defense for a horseman's head.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 22
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

The winner (right) will ride back to the jury with the carcass once he has planted it in the target.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 23
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

The winner of the game of Uloq rides back towards the jury and spectators with his spoils.

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Uloq in Uzbekistan 24
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
10 Mar 2015

A lone Uloq rider wanders with his horse in the field of battle at the end of the game.

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Central Asian Gypsy Circumcision Party
Parkent, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
09 Mar 2015

Photos and Text by Timur Karpov/Transterra Media

The Mugat are an ancient nomadic people living in Central Asia. Also known as the "Central Asian Gypsies", their lifestyle is similar to European Roma: they live in camps, migrate across countries, and begand recycle garbage for money. Many people in Uzbekistsan, a country with a significant Mugat population, believe the Mugat have magic powers and know secret curses.

Usually the Mugat never let cameramen inside their community and are warey of outsiders. This Mugat ceremony, called "Khatna-tuy", took place in a small city of Parkent, Uzbekistan. Mugat people from camps around Parkent gathered together to celebrate the circumcision of one of the boys from the community. As an Islamic people, circumcision is one of the most important events in the life of a Mugat man. On the day of his ceremony, he receives money and gifts from community, while guests enjoy cheap vodka, bowls of meat, and dancing.

These photos provide an inside look at the rituals of one of the most secretive peoples in one of the world's most secretive states. 

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Uloq: Uzbekistan's Ancient Extreme Sport
Ertosh, Uzbekistan
By TTM Contributor 100
28 Jan 2015

Photos by Umida Akhmedova

Uloq is the Uzbek version of the famous Asian Buzkashi game. This tradition was spread in Central Asia and Afghanistan by Mongols with their cult of horsemen. The rules are simple: riders compete for a carcass of a goat or a young ram. The winner has to cross the finish line on horseback without allowing other riders to rob him of his prey. Like Buzkashi, Uloq is an extremely dangerous sport: 100 or more horsemen usually fight for a one carcass. Major Uloq games are usually held in the spring or autumn, when the Central Asian peoples traditionally celebrate their weddings, and is often played before the arrival of their main Spring festival, Nowruz. The official Uloq Federation of Uzbekistan conducts frequent tournements and competitions, bringing together up to 500 riders and thousands of spectators to watch the fast, intense sport.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST