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India' Third Gender
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
19 Jun 2017

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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Gay Pride in Brescia
Brescia
By Cosimo Attanasio
17 Jun 2017

Giampietro Belotti a.k.a. "the Illinois Nazi". He became famous years ago for his funny activism, wearing the clothes of the Illinois Nazi from the movie "Blues Brothers".

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Gay Pride in Brescia
Brescia
By Cosimo Attanasio
17 Jun 2017

Girls refreshing their feet walking on the water in Victory square.

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Gay Pride in Brescia
Brescia
By Cosimo Attanasio
17 Jun 2017

At the end of the demo, in Victory square, the presenter Giorgio Conti on stage.

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Gay Pride in Brescia
Brescia
By Cosimo Attanasio
17 Jun 2017

Vladimir Luxuria, first Italian transgender deputy in the Parliament.

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Gay Pride in Brescia
Brescia
By Cosimo Attanasio
17 Jun 2017

A man masked as "Transexual Pope Francis"

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Gay Pride in Brescia
Brescia
By Cosimo Attanasio
17 Jun 2017

African gay at the demo. In many places in Africa gay have no rights, some of them waiting for political refugee status.

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Italian Gay Pride
Brescia
By Cosimo Attanasio
17 Jun 2017

Pictures from the national demonstration of Gay Pride, for the first time in Brescia.

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Malmo Gay Pride in Sweden
Malmo, Sweden
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

Sweden's 2nd city hosted from 3th to 8th august the Malmo Pride. A number of events were organised during the week, with a big march on the Saturday 8th through the city. Existing since 1995 Malmo Rainbow festival spreading both knowledge of LGBT (Gay Bi Trans Queer) and the joy of life to the city. The festival is a celebration where LGBTQ movement are making their voices heard. According to the organizers the festival purpose is to make visible the diversity of expression by arranging and coordinating arts and culture. It also creates meeting places and arenas for knowledge deepening, dialogue, reflection, attitude and social influence. Rainbow Festival Malmö Pride is open and available to all who share and respect the following values and respects the culture that has its roots in the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and queer life. In this photos selection the Parade closing the Rainbow festival Malmo Pride 2015. After a week long pride festival a parade through the street of Malmo with 7500 participant, a record number, ended the festivities with a party in the centrally placed Colkets park (The peoples Park)

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Gay Parade in Malmo 01
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

Two girls are kissing each other during the LGBT pride parade in Malmo.

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Gay Parade in Malmo 02
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

A young girls holding a message during the LGBt pride in Malmo

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Gay Parade in Malmo 03
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

Local police preparing to walk as part of the LGBT pride in Malmo

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Gay Parade in Malmo 04
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

The 20th LGBT Pride in Malmo attracted thousand of people during the parade.

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Gay Parade in Malmo 05
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

People marched along the roads of the city center of Malmo from 11 am to 3 pm.

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Gay Parade in Malmo 06
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

Activist displaying a message on the main square og Malmo during the LGBT pride.

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Gay Parade in Malmo 07
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

Participant of Malmo LGBT parade at the People's Park where the parade end up.

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Gay Parade in Malmo 08
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

People gather along the parade way cheering and dancing.

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Gay Parade in Malmo 09
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

People gather along the parade way cheering and dancing.

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Gay Parade in Malmo 10
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

Pakistan Transgender activist took part on the parade on board of Copenhaghen parade truck.

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Gay Parade in Malmo 11
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

The parade crossing the city center supported by loud speaker for the dancing followers.

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Gay Parade in Malmo 12
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

People on wheel chair attended at the LGBT parade in Malmo.

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Gay Parade in Malmo 13
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

A record number of 7 500 participated in the parade on the closing day of the Rainbowfestival Malmo Pride.

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Gay Parade in Malmo 14
Malmo
By vincenzo floramo
08 Aug 2015

People of every age gathered on the parade way.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 03
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
08 Jun 2015

Alejandro Antonio González, 22, from Guatemala, attends a session with his psychologist, provided by the local NGO Exil in Barcelona, Spain.
Alejandro arrived in Barcelona in September 2013, after being bullied for his homosexual condition for many years back home: his father repudiated him, police used to harass him and his friends in public areas and he was even once kidnapped and raped by two unknown men. He is happy to be now in Barcelona where he attends a psychologist who helps him feel free to express his sexuality. He actively participates in sexual education campaigns for the gay community and he would like to become a nurse in the future.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 48
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
08 Jun 2015

Alejandro Antonio González (right), 22, from Guatemala, has a drink with one of his best friends in Barcelona, Spain.
Alejandro arrived in Barcelona in September 2013, after being bullied for his homosexual condition for many years back home: his father repudiated him, police used to harass him and his friends in public areas and he was even once kidnapped and raped by two unknown men. He is happy to be now in Barcelona where he attends a psychologist who helps him to feel free to express his sexuality, he actively participates in sexual education campaigns for the gay community and he would like to become a nurse in the future.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 02
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
08 Jun 2015

Alejandro Antonio González (center), 22, from Guatemala, walks in Barcelona city center, Spain, with two of his best friends.
Alejandro arrived in Barcelona in September 2013, after being bullied for his homosexual condition for many years back home: his father repudiated him, police used to harass him and his friends in public areas and he was even once kidnapped and raped by two unknown men. He is happy to be now in Barcelona where he attends a psychologist who helps him feel free to express his sexuality, he actively participates in sexual education campaigns for the gay community and he would like to become a nurse in the future.

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Gayrilleros8
santa clara, cuba
By Conteur d'images
03 Oct 2014

Certain artists, such as Juan and Lorenzo of the dancing quartet “The Dream Boys”, portray feminine characters without having started hormonal treatments. They consider themselves to be primarily “transformists”, though some of them will one day become transsexuals.

Juan et Lorenzo, membres du quatuor de danseurs homosexuels The Dream Boys, sont considérés comme des transformistes, étant donné qu’ils interprètent des rôles féminins. Originaires de La Havane, ils se rendent tous les hivers à Santa Clara pour donner des représentations. Contrairement aux artistes transsexuels, ils ne souhaitent pas changer de sexe et n’arborent pas de vêtements féminins en dehors de la scène.

Ciertos artistas, como Juan y Lorenzo del cuarteto de bailarines gays “The Dream Boys”, interpretan personajes femeninos pero todavía no toman tratamiento hormonal. Se consideran ante todo como transformistas, antes de convertirse, para ciertos, en transexuales.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 28
Maldonado, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
26 Jan 2014

Franco (18) and Helena Maria (2) came from poor rural families to be adopted by Daniel M. (52) and Walter MA (38), activists in the LGBT community who have been adopting underprivileged children at the biological parents' behest.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 29
Maldonado, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
26 Jan 2014

Daniel M. (52) and Walter MA (38) have the biggest homosexual family in Latin America. After 20 years as a couple, they have adopted four children: Franco, Mayara, Maria Pia and Helena Maria. The children arrived from poor families where they couldn't survive. In these last 20 years, desperate mothers have asked to Walter and Daniel to adopt their children. "They're not Desaparecidos!" Daniel says, "they have constant contact with their biological families". Daniel and Walter have been active in the LGBT community in Latin America for 25 years. Today, adoption by same-sex couples is legal in 16 countries, including Uruguay.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender01
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.

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MiguelCandela_The3rdGender02
New Delhi
By Miguel Candela
24 Jan 2014

Known to provide good luck in religious ceremonies, the 'hijra' -term known in India to men who are castrated but who do not complete the sex change process- transvestites and transgenders also face the inflexibility of a society that condemns them and suffer police abuse, begging and prostitution, often under the control of mafias. They belong to the social group most discriminated in India. A primary reason of the exclusion is the lack of legal recognition of the gender status of the Hijras and other transgender people. It is the major obstacle that often prevent them in exercising their rights. Society denies them of employment which leads them to prostitution and begging. The blessing of a 'hijra' is considered necessary for newborns and newlyweds to succeed. These services are paid well but not as much as sex. Hence, most of them prefer to sell their bodies on the streets. The 'hijras' prostitutes suffer a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis. They are a weak and easy target unbacked by society.