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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
13 May 2016

Despite the prison is self-managed, security and administrative management of the prison entrusted to the police. In the pyramid of the prison system, at the back of the interior minister and the director of the penitentiary department there is the colonel-in-chief, the only one who actually lives in the building and, in fact, represents the Bolivian government within the walls of San Pedro. Often they are interviewed by journalist and videomaker and, with same frequency, they are replaced by their superiors.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
10 May 2016

In each section are placed some pay phones equipped with metered and managed by one or more inmates, required to pay the good section of the revenues. The phone, controlled by the police prison, should be the only system of communication with the outside. In truth, most of the prisoners own a mobile phone with which it can continue to manage relationships with the outside and, if they did, their illicit activities, unaware of the police.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
10 May 2016

Section Pinos, which owes its name to a large tree in the middle of his small yard, holds two restaurants, two bars, a soccer field, a billiard room and a study room, now it used as a copy shop. The lack of accommodation available in the prison, because of overcrowding, led prisoners to set up makeshift shelters practically anywhere: attics, stairs and gaps have thus become housing for one or more people, sometimes entire families.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
05 May 2016

The monoblock of Palmar, although it is a collective dormitory, it is equipped with a TV and three electric hot-plates. Television, inside the prison, is a faithful mate of life for the majority of the prisoners and it continues to remain on even when no one looks.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
05 May 2016

Visits inside the prison are allowed for most days of the week and like everything inside the prison are by payment.Visitors are allowed to spend the entire day inside and through an additional payment, even to stay overnight.Who does not receive visits can always reach his loved ones through the inevitable phone, only prohibited on paper and for which refills are sold in many commercial activities managed by the prisoners.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
05 May 2016

The roofs of the prison, which are accessed by some cells of the last floor moving a sheet resting on the beams, are used for a variety of activities:drying foods,sunbathing,smoking outdoors and drying clothes . Of this late activity are occupied the mostly of poorest prisoners who, after washing clothes, bedding and mattresses for other companions; they venture on to the rickety sheet metal roofing at about 10 meters above the ground, seriously endangering their lives, to earn only a few pesos.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
04 May 2016

Within a niche carved into the wall and protected by a wooden structure, a television with a powerful sound system it offers a little ‘entertainment to the prisoners, in the yard of Palmar section. Often some viewers are not part of the section but, despite being prohibited, there is a tacit tolerance and shared.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
29 Apr 2016

Marco, a young twenty year old with a long interval between the recovery community and juvenile prison dreams, as a free man, a future in hip hop music. habitual consumer of alcohol and drugs of all kinds, he wrote his lyrics mostly in prison, where he finds every day a lot of ideas, including the conditions of the detainees and their adventures before his arrest. It is more inspired by Latin American artists and Cypress Hill.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
25 Apr 2016

Among the many commercial and craft activities there is a dressmaker’s workroom manage by 3 three prisoners, which shall make garments both for the prisoners themselves than for external institutions and associations. Genaro, the head of the workshop, he learned to be a tailor in prison and dreams, as a free man, to open his own workshop. In his past, for years, he had always dealt with the cocaine refining process in the Bolivian jungle and he had never done work legally paid.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
21 Apr 2016

In addition to the shelters and individual cells, there are also common dormitories, arranged to accommodate a larger number of prisoners, because the rent of a single cell is quite expensive and many can not afford it.To convict it is given a bed, a personal locker and the possibility to use the common warming. So, without any rehabilitative logic, prisoners in preventive detention, young thieves and small-time dealers must live side by side with murderers, rapists and drug traffickers.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
18 Apr 2016

Several times a week entering hundreds of liters of smuggled alcohol in San Pedro. Corruption, which is overflowing among the police, it allows the input and feeds a commercial chain, as well, is created. Mostly it is pure alcohol at 96 °, manufactured by the bolivian company names Caiman and packaged in aluminum cans of 1 liter with a characteristic purple color. After the resale and consumption of their content, the latter are recycled within the prison and thus become pretty toys sold outside.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
08 Apr 2016

Penitenziary organization gives the breakfast and the lunch to the prisoners, in the plazas of the sections. Out of this, everything is by payment. Every is coocked by prisoners in the kitchen of Palmar section.

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The Power of Sport
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
10 Jul 2015

In a world where differences and divisions often drive people apart, sport brings people together. Sport overcomes cultural, social, and political barriers, providing an opportunity for dialogue and positive human interaction.

Transterra Media has the world of sports covered, from the fighting Cholitas of Bolivia, to the female boxers of Calcutta, and more.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 53
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (left), 46, from Bolivia, attends a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 52
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (center), 46, from Bolivia, attends a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 54
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, and her friend Graciela (left), walk downstairs to the metro station after attending a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 55
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez, 46, from Bolivia, travels by metro after attending a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 51
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
16 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (center), 46, from Bolivia, visits Leonor (left) and her partner Nixon at her house in Barcelona, Spain. Leonor, a 67-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 04
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (left), 46, from Bolivia, makes up Josefina's face, at Sant Joan Despí Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. Josefina, a 96-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of elder and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 06
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Bolivian national Gilda Arnez (left), 46, visits Fina and others at her former job at Sant Joan Despí­ Hospital, in Barcelona.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 49
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, visits Maravillas at her house in Cornellà, Barcelona, Spain. Maravillas, a 90-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 50
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, visits Maravillas at her house in Cornellà, Barcelona, Spain. Maravillas, a 90-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 05
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, visits Gustavo (center) at Clinica Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe in Esplugues de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. Gilda used to be his caregiver few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of elder and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Cholitas Wrestling
By Sergio García Locatelli
20 May 2014

A group of bolivian female wrestlers in "El Alto", La Paz seeks for its own moment of glory. The origin of the wrestling was a way to defend themselves from the genre violence.

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Women Wrestling (32 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Marta La Altena humiliates her opponent, to the delighted outrage of the crowd.

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Women Wrestling (33 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Denita La Intocable exhorts her fans to make some noise during her bout with the evil Marta La Altena.

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Women Wrestling (34 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

In the last ten years, increasing numbers of indigenous woman have been entering the rings in the outskirts of La Paz, fighting back against the dominant culture of machismo and discrimination.

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Women Wrestling (35 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Residents of El Alto riveted by the Sunday afternoon action at the 12 Octubre Stadium. The vast majority of the city's population is indigenous - and poor. The weekly bouts make for an inexpensive family day out.

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Women Wrestling (36 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

In an early bout, Dina La Reina Del Ring is ambushed by her female opponent's masked male partner. She manages to get the better of both of them - for now.

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Women Wrestling (37 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

The Polla skirt is one of the most recognisable elements in the Aymara woman's traditional dress. Derived from traditional Spanish costumes of centuries ago, it has become a symbol of indigenous pride.

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Women Wrestling (38 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

The Cholita Luchadores spend a lot of time on their appearance prior to entering the ring. There is an air of female camaraderie in the makeshift changing room, before the battles begin, of course.

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Women Wrestling (39 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Dina La Reina Del Ring, in prayer, before her bout at the 12 Octubre Stadium in El Alto.

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Women Wrestling (40 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Carmen Rojas takes a pinch of Coca Leaf about an hour before she enters the ring. Coca is widely chewed amongst the Aymara and Quechua population. Its practical effects - mental stimulation, appetite suppression and energy are a boon in the ring.

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Women Wrestling (41 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Marta La Altena aka Jenny Mamani Herrera gives her daughter some money to buy groceries with. Her real life personality is a far cry from her evil wrestling persona.

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Women Wrestling (42 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Marta la la Altena is helped by her sister as she prepares for her bout that evening.

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Women Wrestling (43 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Marta La Altena aka jenny Mamani Herrera prepares for her Sunday evening bout. First job...which bowler hat is going to be the perfect match for her outfit? These distinctive hats, worn by Aymara women, were originally intended for use by railroad workers, but struck a chord with indigenous women instead.

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Women Wrestling (44 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Marta La Altena head up the valley towards the main road where a car will take her to the 12 October Stadium for her evening bout. Behind her in the distance can be seen the office blocks of La Paz, Bolivia's literally breath-taking de facto capital.

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Bolivian Female Wrestlers
Bolivia
By U.S. Editor
03 Jun 2012

In the last ten years, increasing numbers of indigenous woman have taken to wrestling in the outskirts of La Paz, fighting back against the dominant culture of machismo and discrimination.

Yolanda La Amarosa flies through the air in a swirl of gold lamé and petticoats, her calves clamped around the throat of her unfortunate opponent. He spins across the ring to land in a sprawl on the canvas, hand pressed against his lower back, face set in a grimace of agony. Quieres mas, cabron? Yolanda cries as she strides over and kicks him in the back of the head. There’s a ripple of applause and laughter from her fellow wrestlers, who are hanging on the ropes, waiting their turn to practice the same sequence.

The ring is set up in a junkyard on the outskirts of El Alto, a sprawling migrant city that was once just a suburb of La Paz, the capital of Bolivia. The wrestlers are training on torn mattresses atop wooden planks. It’s late afternoon and the sun dips quickly behind the peaks of the altiplano. At well over 4000 metres, the air is thin and freezing. As the session ends, Yolanda puts her bowler hat on at a jaunty angle, sits on a pile of bricks and asks me, que quieres saber…?

Yolanda Veraluz was one of the first cholita luchadores in Bolivia. Like almost all her fellow female wrestlers, she’s indigenous Aymara – a descendant of the Tiahuanaco culture that predated the Inca. Women started wrestling in Bolivia in the nineties, going head to head with the men. In a country where machismo is almost a reflex, the cholita luchadores have become a symbol of female empowerment – a fact of which Yolanda is all too aware. “We’ve shown that women don’t have to accept discrimination and humiliation… that a woman can speak with the same voice as the man. She has the same rights as her husband – to study, to work, to get ahead.”

Once derogatory, the chola moniker has become a source of pride. In October 2011, many of the top cholita wrestlers broke away from the main wrestling organization, Titanes del Ring, which was dominated by one man, Juan Mamani. Disillusioned with Mamani’s autocratic approach, they set up an independent association and are going it alone. "Juan Mamani stole our money," says Yolanda. "But we realized that we don't need him. We can do this ourselves."

Populist president Evo Morales has been a vocal champion of Bolivia's predominantly poor indigenous population - in particular its women. In 2010, he put together a cabinet that was evenly split between genders and which included three indigenous women. There are now signs of an emerging indigenous middle class in the capital La Paz. “Five years ago, we were looked down upon – we used to just wait on the rich,” Yolanda tells me. “But now, thanks to our President, we’re working in banks, in offices and even in government.”

Multimedia Piece Available Here:
http://transterramedia.com/media/15848

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Women Wrestling (2 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

An indigenous woman begs outside Iglesia de San Francisco in La Paz. La Paz has long been a place of both indigenous and gender discrimination, as well as a hotbed of revolution.

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Women Wrestling (3 of 44)
Bolivia
By James Morgan
03 Jun 2012

Marta La Altena adds the final touches to her wrestling costume in preparation for her Sunday night bout. Marta - real name Jenny Mamani Herrera - supplements her income from wrestling by making and selling associated paraphernalia.