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Clashes in Tunisia over Petrofac Jobs
Kerkennah
By Mourad TEYEB
14 Apr 2016

Clashes erupted on Thursday and Friday evenings in Kerkennah, an island off the east coast of Tunisia, between police and demonstrators.
Police used tear gas and water jets to disperse protesters who threw stones at law enforcement officers.
Residents of the island have been carrying out protests against the British oil company Petrofac, which they accuse of denying jobs to unemployed youth on the island.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' : Ten Years Since ...
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
26 Oct 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Ever since, these suburbs have been the subject of stigma in the press, and in some cases of fear from those residing in central Paris. This collection of photos, shot between 2013 and 2015 shows scenes from everyday life in a few Paris suburbs. Despite being the focus of media attention after the attacks of November 13, 2015 led to a shootout in one near suburb, and mosques where 'radical' Islam is preached being shut down in others, they are - for the most part - normal neighborhoods suffering from a lack of attention from the state, and society at large.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 25
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
26 Oct 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. Cité Karl Marx in the suburb Bobigny. Mai 16, 2006, Bobigny, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 17
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
20 Oct 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. In this suburb, La Courneuve, 5 km from Paris, lower buildings have since 2005 - when the suburbs were on fire - replaced much of the dilapidated high-rise flats. 20 October 2015, La Courneuve, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 18
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
20 Oct 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. Residents from La Courneuve, a suburb at 5 km from Paris, wait for the visit of President Francois Hollande. In the background, the 15-story high apartment complex Mail de Fontenay, part of the so called "4000" complex, flats that have been built here in 1964. 20 October 2015, La Courneuve, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 19
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
20 Oct 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. A boy in La Courneuve watches the crowd during a visit of President Francois Hollande, who was greeted with boos. La Courneuve is 5 km from Paris. 20 October 2015, La Courneuve, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 20
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
19 Oct 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. The flat the "Petit Debussy" is now empty and is one of the last to be demolished. This suburb at 5 km from Paris, was called the "4000" after the four thousand flats that have been built here in 1964. 19 October 2015, La Courneuve, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 21
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
19 Oct 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. Young people in the suburb La Courneuve at 5 km from Paris. They live in the 15 story appartment Mail de Fontenay, part of the "4000" complex, namd after the four thousand flats that have been built here in 1964. 19 October 2015, La Courneuve, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 22
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
19 Apr 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. NESS, a Hip Hop dancer, here seen in the suburb Sevran. 19 April 2015, Sevran France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 01
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Housing complex Chene Pointu is one of the most dilapidated apartment complexes in France, only here the poor can rent an appartment without questions asked. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 02
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Housing complex Chene Pointu is one of the most dilapidated apartment complexes in France, only here the poor can rent an appartment without questions asked. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 05
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Letter boxes in the housing complex Chene Pointu. 22 January 2015, Clichy-sous-Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 08
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. The building of a new police station was one of the measures taken after the riots. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 09
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy-sous-Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Keita Konate 23 years and her baby Asa 8 month. The family rents one room of 9 m2 for 450 euros a month. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 11
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Mother and child during the midday school break. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 15
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Resident originally from Mali walks home after shopping, 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 06
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
21 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. A makeshift mosque in the appartment complex Chene Pointu. 21 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 04
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
20 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Housing complex Chene Pointu is one of the most dilapidated apartment complexes in France, only here the poor can rent an appartment without questions asked. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 07
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
20 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Café Aram is the only cafe in the appartment complex Chene Pointu. 20 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 10
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
20 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Bedroom for 4 children of single mother from Cameroon in the housing complex ‘Chene Pointu’. 20 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France

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Living in between: young albanians in...
Pristina
By alfredoc
15 Jan 2015

After Kosovo obtained its independence in 2008, young Kosovar Albanians are trying to become protagonists of the future of their own country: a population of 2 million inhabitants, mainly Muslims, and 52% under the age of 25.

The majority of the youth live in major cities where they try to obtain a university degree and often speak. English fluently. Young people in Kosovo are also politically active and strongly critical against the current government for its failure to meet the needs of the general population and for corruption.

In towns and small cities, young families live in precarity, with an unemployment rate reaching almost 70% and wages far below the European average at around 300 euros per month in the larger cities.

Youngsters are at crossroads: on one hand they want to create their own identity, but at the same time they question their real possibilities in a country that, according to an activist belong to Vetevendosje (a movement for self-determination), “resembles an eternal patient, constantly cared for by doctors who don’t perform any real healing that would allow him to walk with his own legs.”

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 23
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
14 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. The neigborhood "La Grand Borne" in Grigny is one of the most infamous around Paris. January 14, 2015, Grigny, France.

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In Search of Poland's Black Gold
Walbrzych, Poland
By Michael Biach
29 Dec 2014

(FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST)

For centuries coal mining has been the most important industry in Walbrzych, Poland. However, in the 1980s many of the coal mines became unprofitable. With Poland's transformation from a state-directed to a free-market economy in the 1990s, nearly all of the coal mines in Lower Silesia were shut down. Thousands of people became jobless.

The area still has one of the highest unemployment rates in the country despite new industry settling in the area. It didn't take very long until the jobless miners in the area started to dig for coal on their own. The business is dangerous and illegal. Tunnels leading as deep as ten or fifteen meters below the ground are only protected by wood and sandbags. Inside, people dig for coal the same way they did centuries ago, by hand.

Police regularly arrest illegal coal miners and confiscate their equipment, so most people dig by night to avoid police control. Not only the well-educated former miners search for 'black gold,' but also young and unexperienced jobless men risk their freedom and their lives to make a couple of Euros a night by selling illegal coal to residents.

Every year several people die after tunnels collapse. Roman Janiszek is a former coal miner, now an illegal miner who has founded a committee that is trying to make the activities legal and also to keep track of the situation in the outskirts of Walbrzych. Roman also points to the fact that people not only lost their jobs and privileges but also their social position with the closing of the mines. Once prideful coal miners, people like Roman Janiszek now work illegally every night to make a living.

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No Payroll in Gaza
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
16 Dec 2014

(01:00 -01:46)

(Man, Arabic)

Mohamad Tahoun

I am Mohamad Ahmed Abu Tahoun, I work in sanitation in al-Nasr children hospital. We have been on a strike for 8 days. And until now nothing is being said about the salaries.

As you can see our situation, nobody is helping us, if we find food we cook, if not we count of God. In our family, 3 men work in sanitation, and we have two handicaps to take care of. But we have not been paid for almost 4 months. Our situation is bad.

(02:09)

(Woman, Arabic)

Cherine tahoun

Interviewer: What is your name?

Cherine Tahoun: my name is cherine

Interviewer: what is your last name?

Cherine Tahoun: Tahoun

Interviewer: How old are you? 16, 26?

Cherine Tahoun: Yes

Interviewer: where did you learn embroidery?

Cherine Tahoun: at school

Interviewer: This is all your work? show us

(02:55-04:13)

(Woman, arabic)

Suzanne

I am Suzanne, Mohamad's wife, we are three sisters married to three brothers. My eldest sister got married to Rafi Abu Tahoun, and four years later, I married Mohamad, and then my youngest sister married Iyad, about two years ago.

We are technically living together now, we used to live separately, but now, and because of the situation, we had to live together.

With the salary of 700 shekel, we used to barely be able to manage, but now when we no longer receive the 700 shekel, our situation is terrible. let alone the fact that we have handicaps, we also have children in schools. They need allowances, books, stationary. It is a very hard position that we are in. I hope that when winter comes, things will be easier for us, I hate winter now, because of the cold and the leaking that happen into the house.

I graduated from the university in 2008, and until now, I did not get a job in any domain and i did not even receive an unemployment allowance. in god's will if I find a job, our situation will definitely improve.

(05:01-05:48)

(Man, Arabic)

Iyad Tahoun

My name is Iyad Ahmed Mohamad Abu Tahoun, I work in the sanitation company, and they have not been paying us for 4 months. My son needs medications every week. any we cannot pay, even the supermarket owner is not allowing us to take stuff and pay later. We had to take things from the pharmacy and the supermarket and promise to pay later, but our debt grew and the supermarket owner told me to pay my debt in order to keep giving us things.

The government in Gaza is blaming the government of the West Bank and the other way around.

I hope that the officials can find a solution to our problem. because we can no longer handle the situation.

(09:13-09:37)

(Man, Arabic)

Rafi Tahoun

She suffered from a stroke about two months ago, stayed in the hospital for a while and then we took her home, they improved for a while but recently her situation got worst. She cannot eat unless we use a syringe. Most of our stuff we get on the intention to pay later, or from people who offer help sometimes.

(09:39-09:59)

(Woman, Arabic)

We need lots of things,we need tissues, two boxes everyday, they cost 5 Shekel. and we need diapers every week, they cost 28 shekel, and there is no payment, no salaries, we get all of the things that we need, including food, with debt. The situation is difficult, as you can see.

(10:00-10:25)

(Man, Arabic)

Rafi Tahoun

The sanitation situation in the hospital is bad, there are volunteers, but it is not the same as when we used to work here . They collect the trash and that is it, they do not sanitize what needs to be sanitized.

(12:54-16:23)

(Man, Arabic)

Official

The sanitation workers used to be paid by the government formed by Hamas, but now since the government is one, it is al-Hamdallah government, and is responsible for Gaza and the West Bank, It is responsible for all the education, sanitation and all the other cases. We are not talking about a strike for government employees, we are talking about a strike for private companies employees. those employees work according to contracts were signed in the era of the government of Hamas, and now al-Hamdallah government should be responsible to pay for them.

The political issue between Hamas and Fateh should not be related to the responsibilities of the government. The government should be responsible in Gaza the same way it is responsible in the West Bank.

The government is not doing its duties even though al-Hamdallah visited Gaza, and there are 4 functioning minsters in Gaza, but it is not doing its duties, and that is why the citizens are stressed. The problem of health, unemployment and many others in gaza should be the responsibility of the government.

Hamas requested from the people to volunteer until the problem is solved.

There is no good reason for not paying the employees, employees in other sectors are being paid. the employees have the right to practice all kinds of pressuring methods in order to get their rights, and it has been 6 months of struggling without a solution for this problem.

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Digging for Antiquities in Rural Aleppo
Syria
By Anwar Mohamed
30 Nov 2014

Aleppo, Syria
November 30, 2014

An intimate look into the daily lives of several young men scrounging for objects of archaeological value in the countryside of Aleppo province, Syria. Though both the interviewed men and the specific area in which they are digging for archaeological remnants remain unknown and anonymous, the men delve into their motives for unearthing whatever objects they can find: first to support themselves and second, to support the revolution. To do so, they must contact potential buyers in Turkey (who serve as middle men for selling further abroad); locate particular objects of value; avoid digging in areas under control of rival groups, factions and parties; and avoid the ploys of other smugglers and diggers to keep them from locating certain valuable objects (by using decoys).

Soundbites

(Arabic, man) (01:24-01:29) We're very poor, so poor that we cannot even afford bread. That is the situation of each person who works in artifacts.

(Arabic, man) (04:21-04:31) We are hoping to find gold, so we can use it to support the revolution. We have been here for three days.

(Arabic, man) (04:32-04:39) We are here to look for gold because we do not have work, or anything.

(Arabic, man) (04:40-06:22) Interviewer: if you find gold, what do you do with it?

We export it to Turkey, and then there are people in Turkey who sell it to other countries.

Interviewer: what do you wish to do with gold or artifacts if you find any?

I wish to use them to improve our living conditions, to support the revolution, and to help those poor families who cannot even afford food. Personally, for myself, I wish to buy a house, help my family and help all the poor. Half of the people here are not working. We want to support them and support the FSA.

Interviewer: when you find artifacts and sell them, don't you feel guilty that you are taking something which is not yours and selling it?

Those things do not belong to anyone, we dig and work for months and hardly get anything, so I do not think it is wrong, and these are old things.

We are working very hard to get them; previously we weren't able to drill, but here it is easier. The FSA are good people, but when the regime was in control, we could not do this work because whoever got caught would be executed.

(Arabic, man) (06:31-06:37) The tools that we use are very basic, the shovel, the fork and other similar tools

(Arabic, man) (06:50-07:30) We have been working very hard for three months to find gold or artifacts, and until now, have found nothing. We hope to improve our situation, maybe buy a house or a car, because our current situation is very bad, and maybe we can help the poor.

(Arabic, man) (09:15-10:52) We took pictures of this statue and sent it to foreign merchants, but they were not interested. They said they wanted the treasury that contains the gold. However, we cannot get the treasury because it is buried in a mountain where we cannot go, it is an area controlled by a certain party. They saw the picture and did not want it. They wanted the gold. They told us that they used to place statues like that so that when someone found it, he would think it was the treasure and would stop searching for the gold. They did not want it, they wanted the gold.

(Arabic, man) (10:55-11:57) I am Abu Omar, I work with an archeologist, we found this in a grotto, this is a part of a mosaic floor, it is about 2000 years old. We do not have told to take out properly, so it broke into many pieces. This can be sold for almost 50,000$, but now after it all broke. it is no longer worth anything.

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Young Serbians Skeptical about Serbia...
Belgrade
By mattia.marinolli
25 Aug 2014

Serbia’s bid to join the ranks of the European Union has led young Serbians to question whether their country could live up to EU regulations and political commitments. Some even question whether or not membership would bring the long awaited benefits they hoped for.

Serbia went through sweeping changes in the last fifteen years. The country's borders were altered many times, and even if the nation closed the chapter on the Balkan wars of the 1990s, the effects of the past still echo in contemporary Serbian society.

Rejhana, 21, is a third-year art student at the State University in the southwestern city of Novi Pazar. She was a successful tennis player, but an injury stopped her career.

"I quite hope I will go somewhere else to live,” she says. “I would like to attend postgraduate studies somewhere in Europe and try to stay there. I think there’s not much perspective for people who are keen on art in our country, especially our city.”

Rather than staying in her native Serbia, Rejhana would like to devote herself to traveling and “meeting the world and its gifts.”

“I can see myself as a painter in the future, for example in five years, not in Serbia but in some European country, having individual exhibitions and a permanent job,” she said.

The biggest and most populous country in the western Balkans seems to be the furthest one from Europe. Serbia began its membership talks with the European Union last January. The arrest and extradition of the last of the country’s indicted war criminals and talks with Kosovo to normalize relations were the two key points demanded by Brussels as conditions to EU membership.

“Even though I think we are quite far from EU in terms of our mentality, our attitudes,” Rejhana said, “we [the youth] hope this will change in the future with entrance into the EU."

Serbia's situation is fragile. The unemployment rate is above 20 percent, and a lack of foreign investments has slowed down economic growth in the country. Furthermore, Cyclone Tamara, the worst of its kind in 120 years of recorded weather measurements, hit the region around Belgrade in last June.

Marko, 26, is the local youth representative of the Democratic Party of Serbia in Raska, a small town in south-central Serbia. Although he studies in the Faculty of Security in Belgrade, he spends a lot of time in his hometown and expressed concern for the situation of the youth there.

"There are a lot of problems getting a job in my hometown,” he said. “Over 50 percent of the youth is unemployed here. Politicians easily employ people they want, no matter if they are qualified for the job or not, and we often see situations where unqualified people work in places are normally reserved for those who graduated and are experts, but do not have political connections.”

Marko looks forward to better times if Serbia gets closer to the EU, attracting more investments and improving the country’s economy. “I worked on projects which were funded by the EU, and because of this experience, I can certify that the means of the EU would contribute to the faster development of our country and employment of the youth.”

However, Marko is also worried that being part of the EU could lead many young qualified people to leave Serbia, as “opportunities will undoubtedly become much easier than before.”

“The bad side to entrance [into the EU] is that if highly educated people leave the country, then unqualified people will remain and be left only to perform unskilled labor,” he said.

Others remain skeptical about the European Union, considering the less-than-stellar performances neighboring countries that passed through the integration process, like Romania and Croatia; and the 1999 NATO bombings in Belgrade that indelibly marked many Serbs.

Marija, 23, has just finished her BA in German language and now is attending an MA program in Kragujevac.

“I have to say that EU is not held by the whole European members, but only by some countries within it,” she said. “It is not known that the EU commands the living conditions of other countries. Small countries like Serbia were just dropped into a system of aristocratic rule. Countries like Germany or the UK actually command the economic flow and get the credit.”

Serbia has its own fight against the corruption in the political system that has contaminated the economic sector. Membership of a political party seems to be a prerogative if someone wants to get a job, and the salaries are too low to ensure proper living conditions.

Milanka, also 23, comes from Blace, a town in southeast Serbia. She studies Literature and Literary Theory in Belgrade.

"Unemployment is a huge problem,” she said. “People work for very little money. I did not have any perspective there (Blace), and I moved to Belgrade just because I was convinced I would have more opportunities here. The university is better. I could make some contacts with people who could help me to go abroad. I had a dream to leave Serbia; because, being a disabled person, I am aware that my chances for having a normal life in Serbia are small.”

The young Serbian says that many employers don’t employ a person with disabilities. “Some employers were very kind with me, and they told me they would call me, but they did not,” she adds.

“Political factors will decide if Serbia will enter the EU ,and I do not have a defined attitude towards the EU,” Milanka said. “Neither do many people. Even if we entered the EU, we would hardly get used to the tasks which they would require from us. Standards are quite different, and it would take years for Serbia to adopt their way of thinking and acting. We are simply not at the same level. Our nation is really specific. We are quite stubborn, odd and focused on personal ideas more than on work. Garrulity is one of our defining personal characteristics."

Many young people are conscious of the lack of prospects awaiting them once they finish their studies. Some look for better perspectives abroad, with Germany and Northern Europe among their preferred destinations. But the same youths, mistrustful and critical of the Serbian system, may be the generation that will lead Serbia out of its past.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 24
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
18 Jul 2014

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. Girl in the suburb Longjumeau. 18 July 2015, Longjumeau, France.

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The Greek return to the land 02
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

Producing olives was a dream of childhood. Every summer, Dimitris would spend his holidays in his grand-father and uncle’s fields in Pelion. To make this dream come true, he studied agronomy in Athens. But “theory and practice are two different worlds. After my first day of work, I told to my uncle that I understood now why people left the village to live in Athens!”, he laughs. But now his body is shaped to hard work and, fortunately, he can rely on Leonardo, a strong Albanese who works in the Greek lands since he turned 13.

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Transgender in Nepal 11
Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
20 Sep 2013

Neelam hopes that she will find a new job soon.

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Viome, a self-management factory in T...
thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

Before the beginning of the international crisis, Viome were a factory in Thessaloniki with around 80 workers. The factory produced chemical products for the construction sector, owned by Philippou family. The main company of the Philippou's group, Philkeram-Johnson S.A, were in bankrupt in 2011 and the consequences for Viome were immediately adverse. After institutional meetings without a clear solution, the workers decide to re-take the factory and the production. In September 2012, after a 48hours strike, the workers start to discuss the idea of self-management, and the 97% of workers vote for it.

After the occupation of the factory, on 12 February 2013, the workers started the self-management production, selling cleaning products. A huge solidarity movement support the workers, with national and international inititatives to promote and diffuse the "Viome way", where now workers control the factory, without any owner.

Around 40 people work in Viome, with a basic wage for everyone and 8 hours working time 5 days a week. The general assembly decide the main question and a weekly meeting discuss he more operative aspects. "At the beginning was difficult, but we are sure that our situation is gonna be better, even better than before the crisis", said a worker of Viome. Economic crisis and bad decision from the Viome's leadership, contribute to the difficult situation of the factory, with with the probable dismissal of around 80 workers.

Since the workers have retake the factory, they've started a new production of cleaning products, looking for a sustainable and ethical production, including workers rights and a big challenge: spread the idea that workers create everything, and the have to take bake what they onw, in any cities and countries around the world.

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Viome 9
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

"It's all about workers. The workers create everything, they have to take back what the own", said a Viome's worker.

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Viome 18
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

One of the main problems for Viome was the Filkeram factory (building product), owned by Georgios Filippou. Even before the crisis, when the Viome's situation was good, the owner started to cut wages and hire workers.

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Viome 17
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

After bankrupt, workers decide to occupy the factory and then to self-organize the production. Now they produce cleaning products.

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Viome 6
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

A worker close the factory after his 8 hours working shift at Viome in Thessaloniki.

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Viome 11
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

In June 2013, Naomi Klein visited the Viome factory as an experiment of social redistribution from the botton. Actually there is no owner of the factory, just the general assembly makes decisions.

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Viome 5
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

Viome's worker inside the factory

With unemployment climbing to 30%, workers’ income reaching zero, sick and tired of big words, promises and more taxes, unpaid since May 2011 and currently withholding their labour, with the factory abandoned by the employers, the workers of Vio.Me. by decision of their general assembly declare their determination not to fall prey to a condition of perpetual unemployment, but instead to struggle to take the factory in their own hands and operate it themselves.
Thessaloniki, 29.05.2013

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Viome 4
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

A worker during a break in Viome.

Through a formal proposal dating from October 2011 they have been claiming the establishment of a workers' cooperative under full workers’ control, demanding legal recognition for their own workers’ cooperative, as well as for all the others to follow.
Thessaloniki, 29.05.2013

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Egypt's unemployment rate jumped to 1...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
03 May 2013

Egypt's unemployment rate increased to 12.7% in 2012, up from 12% in 2011, and 9% in 2010, according to a report released by the Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS).

This brings the total number of unemployed to 3.4 million, up from 3.1 million in 2011, an increase of 242,000 people.

Particularly, the unemployment rate was 42.7 percent among young people between 20 and 24 years old and was 23 percent among those between 25 and 29 in that year.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ahmed Bahaa El-Din Shaaban, member of both the ‎National Association for Change reform movement and ‎Egypt's Socialist Party:

The number of those employed in 2012 was 23.6 million workers; also there were only about 4.7 million working women in Egypt in 2012, according to the figures.

CAPMAS attributed the increase to the circumstances in Egypt following the 25 January Revolution and the ensuing events “that resulted in a slowdown in economic activities during this period.

These data show the need to embark on an economic reform program that prevents the government from relying on foreign aid, loans and deposits in order to provide the resources.

SOUNDBIDTE 2 (Arabic) – Haytham Mohamadeen, member of the political bureau of the revolutionary socialists:

On the other hand, hundreds of workers marked the Labour Day with marches and protests to voice their discontent with the unfulfilled longstanding demands of workers even after the revolution.

Among these demands are the implementation of minimum wage, independent and representative syndicates for workers, and putting an end to legislation that harms the labour movement.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: Archive except the soundbites
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: May 2, 2013
Length: 00:02:11
Video Size: 107 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Various shots of youth at the universities (Archive)
  2. Various shots of people seating in cafes downtown Cairo (Archive)
  3. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ahmed Bahaa El-Din Shaaban, member of both the ‎National Association for Change reform
  4. Various shots of workers preparing materials and working women inside the factories (Archive)
  5. SOUNDBIDTE 2 (Arabic) – Haytham Mohamadeen, member of the political bureau of the revolutionary socialists:
  6. Various shots of protestors raising banners and poster of former president Gamal Abdel Nasser during a protest marking the Labour Day, downtown Cairo (Archive May: 1)
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