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Blind Man Founds School for Visually ...
Yaounde, Cameroon
By Dzekashu Macviban
19 Feb 2015

Life for visually impaired people in Cameroon is a constant battle, given that they are discriminated upon, a phenomenon which condemns some of them to live in solitude and mendicancy. Even though many of them are undocumented and often ignored by society, this doesn’t stop them from being ambitious and entrepreneurial. This is the case with Coco Bertin, who runs CJARC, one of Cameroon’s most solicited rehabilitation centres for the visually impaired. Bertin speaks fondly of his centre, saying “I am morally gratified by the fact that I am able to help other people, so that they can share in my happiness.” 
Upon graduating in 1986, Coco Bertin, who is visually impaired, received a modest financial incentive of CFA 61.500 from the Rehabilitation Institute for the Blind in Buea. Rather than indulge in mendicancy as is the case with so many blind people, he decided to start an organisation that could provide strategic education for the visually impaired. This decision was greatly influenced by the fact that people with disabilities who go to school find it very difficult coping with a system which does not take them into account when drawing the curriculum. 
In order to achieve this, he started working on the furniture for his organisation, which he named COJARY (it was later renamed CJARC [Club des Jeunes Aveugles Réhabilités du Cameroun] in 1988) from his bedroom in his parents’ house, and as well joined forces with Martin Luther, another visually impaired person who graduated from the same school as himself. From Bertin’s parents’ bedroom, the activities moved to the veranda of the Departmental Delegation of Social Affairs in the Essos neighbourhood. 

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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US Teacher Stabbed to Death in Abu Dhabi
Abu Dhabi
By WL
04 Dec 2014

December 4, 2014
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

An American teacher was stabbed to death in a woman's toilet at a shopping mall in Abu Dhabi. The murder was apparently carried out by a woman dressed head to toe in a traditional black abaya with black gloves and face cover, worn by may women in the Gulf. Investigations are still on going as to the suspects gender and identity. The victim of the attack has been identified as kindergarten teacher Ibolya Ryan, a Romanian born mother of 11 year old twins. She had previously taught school in Colorado.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 12
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The straw and mud structure of the school is not solid. Inside the classrooms, the walls have been starting to fall apart.

While lack of funds is one reason for the poor structure of the school, the other major factor is an Israeli law banning the use of cement for construction by Palestinians in Area C of the West Bank. The school is located in Area C, which is the part of the West Bank under total Israeli military control.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 07
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The school of Khan Al-Ahmar has classes from grades 1 to 9. Children from five different Bedouin communities attend classes there. Every year, their number grows. There were 120 children for the 2013-2014 school year. In September 2014, 146 came to register.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 08
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

English class for 3rd grade children. All the children are eager to learn. They want to keep studying after the 9th grade, and often want to become doctor or lawyers because there are no medical or legal services in their community. While medical services are a basic essential for any community, legal services are significant to the West Bank Bedouin because they need lawyers to help them battle eviction orders from Israeli courts and the Israeli Army.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 01
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014.
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine.

Teachers run in the rain between their classrooms and the "teachers room" to bring handouts for their students.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 10
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Children in the 8th grade studying, with the shape of the tires appearing in the wall. The goal of many of the students is often to enter into a profession that is not represented in their community, like medical or legal.

Every year the school administration goes to court in order to postpone the demolition of the institution. So far, they have managed to avoid a final demolition, but the orders remain, and it is uncertain how much longer the school will remain.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 04
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Among the classrooms built of soil and rubber tires, two are built of sheet metal. These more sturdy structures are sponsored by the European Union. The State of Israel did not authorize their construction and, as a consequence, they are hidden under tents and tarps.

When materials are donated by foreign donors, like the European Union, they are still at risk of confiscation by Israeli authorities when they are shipped into the area. In February of 2014, Italy donated playground equipment. However, the entire shipment was confiscated by the Israeli Army and materials never made it to the school.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 13
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Every time it rains, the classrooms get wet and humid, and the water leaks into where the students sit. There is also no heater for the cold winter of the desert.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 11
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Harema Zhaeqq is the headmaster of the school. She is highly respected by the teachers, as they say that she is always able to find the necessary furniture for the classes, by canvassing companies in Palestine and abroad. Some companies in Palestine are hesitant to donate, because they fear sanctions from Israel. However, Ms. Zhaeqq is usually able to convince them anyway. Here, she stands beside the supplies for science classes.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 09
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

English class. The children study with bowls on the tables to capture the rain falling into the classrooms.

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Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Two young girls are go to class amidst murals used to add color to the otherwise mundane surroundings.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 03
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Children have to buy their notebooks and school supplies themselves. However, when a family is too poor to pay for school supplies, the teachers gather money to cover the child's expenses.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 02
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Recreation time at the school. A young boy strikes a pose for the camera.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 15
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

A young student runs back to class after playtime. The recreation area is muddy and wet due to heavy rain. The teachers wish the children could have a better space to play in because the ground is not suitable for child recreation.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 14
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The school playground for the Bedouin children of Khan Al-Ahmar is built of tires, mud, and other scrap materials.

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Palestine- when a school is illegal 06
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Signs are made visible outside of the classrooms to thank the public sponsors of the school. While thankful for the funds, the headmaster pointed out that funds are limited and they only receive funds from the European Union and Italy.

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Alice carfrae--8
Rautahat
By Alice Carfrae
05 Dec 2013

Nitu Kumari Sah- Education makes work easier. Education is important for prosperity and well being. People are gathering in the village, flowers are blloming in the jungle, in the same way you are very beautiful.

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Alice carfrae--5
Rautahat
By Alice Carfrae
04 Dec 2013

Girl studying at the Madarassa school in Rautahat. At this school Muslim education is intergrated into mainstream education, so children can recieve recognised school certificates as well as preserving cultural and religious beliefs.

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Alice carfrae--6
Rautahat
By Alice Carfrae
04 Dec 2013

Ismat Parvin- "I want to be a teacher, because as well as giving knowledge you can also learn from the children. If I couldn’t go to school I would be sewing flowers in the factory like the other girls from here."

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Alice carfrae--7
Rautahat
By Alice Carfrae
04 Dec 2013

Ismat makes tea at her family home in Rautahut

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Alice carfrae-
Rautahat
By Alice Carfrae
04 Dec 2013

Grade 1 teacher with her students at the Madarassa school in Rautahat Nepal.

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Alice carfrae--2
Rautahat
By Alice Carfrae
04 Dec 2013

Girl looks up from reading her workbook at the Madarassa school in Rautahat. In this area the dowry system is still in place. If the girl is educated there is less dowry to be paid. They are seen as an asset.

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Alice carfrae--3
Rautahat
By Alice Carfrae
04 Dec 2013

Girls reading from the Koran at the Madarassa school in Rautahat. At this school Muslim education is intergrated into mainstream education, so children can recieve recognised school certificates as well as preserving cultural and religious beliefs.

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Alice carfrae--4
Rautahat
By Alice Carfrae
04 Dec 2013

Girls reading from the Koran at the Madarassa school in Rautahat. At this school Muslim education is intergrated into mainstream education, so children can recieve recognised school certificates as well as preserving cultural and religious beliefs.

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Music Therapy for Autistic Children i...
kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
01 Apr 2013

There is still no official data regarding the numbers of autistic people in Nepal. Unfortunately, it is estimated that the number of autistic children is increasing daily.

Of Nepal’s population of 30 million, a rough estimate shows that 300 thousand people are living with autism, and around 60 to 90 thousand of them are within the spectrum of severe autism.

Autistic children need therapy to improve their understanding and responses. Various treatments such as art therapy, music therapy and occupational therapy have been shown to improve the lives of autistic children.

In this video, Kedar Ghandari, a music therapist, discusses his use of music therapy to help autistic children in Nepal.

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School for Syrian Refugees in Turkey ...
Antakya, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
14 Dec 2012

Teacher Rafah Al Tinawie counsels a student outside class at the Albashayer School for Syrian Refugee Children. Al Tinawie says many children show signs of trauma and she sometimes meets with parents to understand what problems the children are facing.

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She Fighter founder Lina Khalifeh (3 ...
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
11 Dec 2012

She Fighter founder Lina Khalifeh works on defense and martial art techniques with trainees at the She Fighter studio in Amman, Jordan.

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Teachers Protest in Barcelona
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
26 Sep 2012

Public school teachers in Barcelona protest against austerity measures following the mobilization of public school teachers in Catalonia. Today was the first day of the two-day strike called for by teachers in Catalonia. The protest, held in front of the Palace of the Generalitat, the seat of the regional government of Catalonia, had a festive tone. They protest against layoffs of more than 3000 teachers, budget cuts in public schools, increased student-teacher ratio, rising prices and taxes and for the decrease in grants and financial assistance to families.

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Teachers Protest in Barcelona
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
26 Sep 2012

Public school teachers in Barcelona protest against austerity measures following the mobilization of public school teachers in Catalonia. Today was the first day of the two-day strike called for by teachers in Catalonia. The protest, held in front of the Palace of the Generalitat, the seat of the regional government of Catalonia, had a festive tone. They protest against layoffs of more than 3000 teachers, budget cuts in public schools, increased student-teacher ratio, rising prices and taxes and for the decrease in grants and financial assistance to families.

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Teachers Protest in Barcelona
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
26 Sep 2012

Public school teachers in Barcelona protest against austerity measures following the mobilization of public school teachers in Catalonia. Today was the first day of the two-day strike called for by teachers in Catalonia. The protest, held in front of the Palace of the Generalitat, the seat of the regional government of Catalonia, had a festive tone. They protest against layoffs of more than 3000 teachers, budget cuts in public schools, increased student-teacher ratio, rising prices and taxes and for the decrease in grants and financial assistance to families.

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Teachers Protest in Barcelona
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
26 Sep 2012

Public school teachers in Barcelona protest against austerity measures following the mobilization of public school teachers in Catalonia. Today was the first day of the two-day strike called for by teachers in Catalonia. The protest, held in front of the Palace of the Generalitat, the seat of the regional government of Catalonia, had a festive tone. They protest against layoffs of more than 3000 teachers, budget cuts in public schools, increased student-teacher ratio, rising prices and taxes and for the decrease in grants and financial assistance to families.

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Citizen Paparazzi Informants in South...
Seoul, South Korea
By maltekol
15 Sep 2012

South Korean School Teaches Neighbors To Spy On Neighbors
Law-breakers in South Korea, beware.
Citizens who videotape illegal activity are on the loose and making extra income by selling the tapes to the police.
But some observers say a school that trains these citizen spies is turning neighbour against neighbour.

Ji Soo-hyun leads a double life. Starting six-months ago the housewife began a career catching lawbreakers red handed. The 54-year old says her specialty is going undercover at private tutoring schools.

INT: (Korean) Ji Soo-hyun, Citizen Paparazza
“I pretend that I am going to enroll my kids in the school. I ask the faculty about extra services. There are a lot of illegal activities in these schools, like staying open too late and charging additional fees. These are the types of things I record.”

When Ji is on her mission, she uses a small, concealed camera she hides in her bag. She is one of several hundred citizens who have been trained to record secret video of other people and businesses that break the law.

(Video Courtesy of Seoul Paparazzi School) This video was taken at a pharmacy in Seoul. Another citizen spy recorded the cashier that didn’t charge for a plastic bag, which is required by law in South Korea.The cameraman, as well as Ji Soo-hyun, are students of the Seoul paparazzi school.Here they learn the ins and outs of taking undercover video. They can try out tiny cameras that are disguised as jewelry. And they are taught which illegal activities can make them the most money if reported to the authorities.

Moon Seong-ok has run the paparazzi academy for 14 years. He helps his students find buyers for their secret footage.

INT: (KOREAN) Moon Seong-ok, Director, Seoul Paparazzi School
“The students who come here want to make money. I contact them with police agencies, local governments, health agencies and education authorities who pay them.”

Moon claims citizen paparazzi can earn between 20 and 30,000 dollars a year.But some other citizens are concerned that money is turning neighbors into spies. Koo Ja-kyoung describes himself as an ordinary guy who is alarmed at what paparazzi students are doing to his community.

INT: (KOREAN) Koo Ja-kyoung, Seoul
“I was just walking around one day and I saw an old lady crying. I asked her what was wrong and she told me she had to pay a fine because she put out the garbage using an unauthorized plastic bag. She said that a citizen paparazzo took a picture of her and gave it to the police.”

Koo says he was so upset with that woman’s story that he filed a complaint with the National Human Rights’ Commission.
That was several years ago and according to the Commision, until now Koo it’s the only person to complain about citizen paparazzi. The Commission has yet to decide whether or not to hear the case. Its not that South Koreans don’t care about this alleged spying, it’s that they are afraid to speak out against it.

That’s according to Chun Sang-chin, a sociologist at Seoul’s Sogang University. He says most citizens don’t like what the paparazzi do.

INT: (KIREAN) Chun Song-chin, Sogang University
“There is a certain cultural sensitivity here. People are worried that if they come forward and complain then others will think they are actually doing something wrong or illegal. They want others to think that what they do privately is as good as what they do publically, so they stay quiet about these things.”

Chun says the government should stop paying for these secret videos.

INT: Chun
“The government is outsourcing its responsibilities to the citizens. Everyone knows that is wrong. But if you look at Korea’s political history, of dictatorship, it just isn’t a concern for most people. I think it would be hard to create a public debate about the paparazzi”

So for now, South Koreans will do their best to keep their private lives behind closed doors. Moon Seong-ok of the Seoul paparazzi school says he feels no shame about what he or his students do.

INT: (KOREAN) Moon Seong-ok, Director of Seoul paparazzi School
“Good citizens who abide by the law like what the paparazzi citizens do. But for those who break the law, they are the ones who are uncomfortable with what my students do.”

Citizen paparazza Ji Soo-hyun agrees. She says she does not feel sympathy for people breaking the law.

INT: (KOREAN) Ji Soo-hyun, Citizen Paparazza
“At first I felt guilty about reporting on these people, but the more I did it, I realized how much illegal activity is going on around us. These people are not poor or struggling to make a living, so I do not feel bad about reporting on them.”

Ji says she is now turning her camera on people who skip out on paying their taxes.

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Tunisia: teachers are rising up to de...
Tunisia
By jamel
12 Sep 2012

After the Tunisian Minister of Education Abdul Latif Obaid deducted 100 dinars (63$) from the wages of junior high school teachers who protested in May, the General Union of Tunisian Workers organized a demonstration with many of the teachers and trade unionists from different parts of the Republic.