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Music Therapy for Autistic Children i...
kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
01 Apr 2013

There is still no official data regarding the numbers of autistic people in Nepal. Unfortunately, it is estimated that the number of autistic children is increasing daily.

Of Nepal’s population of 30 million, a rough estimate shows that 300 thousand people are living with autism, and around 60 to 90 thousand of them are within the spectrum of severe autism.

Autistic children need therapy to improve their understanding and responses. Various treatments such as art therapy, music therapy and occupational therapy have been shown to improve the lives of autistic children.

In this video, Kedar Ghandari, a music therapist, discusses his use of music therapy to help autistic children in Nepal.

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A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
10 May 2012

Though Kreet's parents are medical doctors it was very difficult for them to diagnose Kreet's autism. “To add to the woes, being a doctor and living with pediatricians also didn’t help us to figure out that Kreet was autistic,” Kapendra Amatya, Kreet's father, says. On 28, August 2008 the parents discovered that Kreet had autism.

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A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
18 Apr 2012

When Kreet was around 18 to 19 months, he stopped speaking the words that he had been learning. Sunita, his mother, could feel that her child was different but she really didn’t know what it was.

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A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Mar 2012

Seven year-old Kreet Amatya is ready for his classes at 5 :30 p.m. He repeats what his mother says. ‘A’ for ‘apple’, B for ‘ball’, and it goes on an on.
The class is an unusual one however, because Kreet is the only student in the room, following his mother’s instructions and trying to understand her gestures, signs and symbols.

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A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
28 Feb 2012

For his parents Kreet is not a nuisance in the family, not even a problem, but instead he offers a different opportunity to look into life, to understand life and be loving and supportive to their son as much as possible. However, the general perception that the relatives and neighbors have toward Kreet is what really disturbs them.

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A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
28 Feb 2012

Kreet loves to do his work on his own. He makes sure to brush his teeth before he sleeps.