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Typewriter
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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Bathroom
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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Stairs - 02
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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Recreation room
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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Office room - 02
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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Inventory room
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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Office room
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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TV
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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Armchair
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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Aisle
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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Documents
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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Stairs
Berlin
By Paolo Gallo
27 Jun 2016

The GDR Iraqi embassy was built in 1974 based on the fact that Iraq was the first non-socialist country to recognize East Germany back in 1969. Of course this meant a lot for the East Germans considering that they chose and preferred the east over the west. Although things didn't look good after the collapse of the wall in 1990. At that time there were rumours that weapons and explosives were being smuggled into Berlin and stored in the embassy. This was the during the Gulf War. There were also reports confirming the weapons and explosives being hidden in the embassy. After the reunification of Germany and new established government, the GDR Iraqi embassy staff were "kindly" asked to leave in January 1991.
Currently Iraq still has the rights of the embassy but the property is owned by Germany (just like any other embassy around the world which is owned by the country it resides in but the rights belong to the country given to). Although neither the current Iraqi government nor the City of Berlin don't know what to do with the site. The embassy has been left to its faith but in the meantime is waiting to be explored by like minded people.

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Beyond the wall 02
Leipzig, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
08 Oct 2014

Three pivotal diplomats active during the period of the Cold War's end meet once again in Leipzig in honor of its 25th anniversary; left-right, former German Foreign Minister Hans Dieter Genscher with U.S. Secretaries James Baker and Henry Kissinger.

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Beyond the wall 03
Leipzig, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
08 Oct 2014

German President Joachim Gauck (right) demonstrates mimeograph machine used during 1989 Leipzig protests before anniversary ceremonies at Nikolai Church. The building served as the organizational nexus for massive protest movements that ultimately helped topple the communist era in late 1989 leading towards German reunification one year later on 3 October 1990.

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Beyond the wall 01
Leipzig, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
08 Oct 2014

Leipzig, Germany commemorates its 25th anniversary for the peaceful revolution of 1989 when initial mass protests catapulted towards opening of the Berlin Wall one month later.

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Beyond the wall 04
Leipzig, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
07 Oct 2014

Symbols of current international hegemony represented by the flags of the European Union, USA and Germany seen during ceremonies of a symbolic signatory for the Berlin Wall opening.

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Beyond the wall 05
Leipzig, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
07 Oct 2014

Former US Secretary James Baker was the honored guest for a signature ceremony featuring a Berlin Wall section which included esteemed colleagues from this historic period.

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Twenty Five Years Beyond the Wall
Berlin
By Steve Weinberg
01 Oct 2014

Germany and particularly the city of Berlin celebrates the 25th anniversary of the opening of the Berlin Wall on 09 November next month, also marking the passage of the first generation which has experienced a post-Soviet world since the post-war years of the mid-twentieth century. An acute reminder of this situation occurred recently during earlier October celebrations in Leipzig, which is now a thriving city in former East Germany. It was here that initial protests in late 1989 helped accelerate the demise of the then totalitarian government and an ultimate opening of the Berlin Wall just weeks later.

Now it is often possible to meet "Wende Kinder," or children-currently young adults- from the turning point or changing times; those born from 1989 and immediately afterwards with no personal memory of the Berlin Wall or Soviet-directed period before that. It is a cultural phenomenon that arises as history becomes respective to its living members who can reflect on collective circumstance. It also becomes an indicator as to how the passage of time can and will affect all of us, now living through the early 21st century together, towards the future's future. Paralleling this historic period compels the comparison towards current events and Russian resurgence onto the global stage of attempted hegemony 25 years later, and urges the premise to question if history repeats through adjusted phases.
As a result of German reunification over two decades later, initial promises have predominantly not been met for a thriving eastern Germany due to disparity in employment opportunities which led to large population migrations to the more prosperous West. Additionally, contrasts in national character between both East and West have contributed to each region retaining their unique identities. Essentially, due to the extended simultaneous reign of the two differing German cultures, fundamental differences still outweigh the similarities. Yet, according to an Interior Ministry Report on German Unity released in 2013, despite the national contrasts, eastern Germany is improving in several ways and remains attractive for its returning inhabitants, signaling an appeal towards their origins despite persistent yet slowly improving economic inequalities.
It remains questionable if the social experiment to reunify Germany has become a reasonable success as a consensus about political assurances made a quarter of a century earlier have so far not been able to be fully achieved. A nostalgic movement has also arisen in several locations, longing for the "Ostalgie" of former times while also enhancing a merchandising appeal for the German tourism industry. The prevailing mood within Berlin and beyond during November's historic occasion will underscore the actual and speculative factors driving the world's fourth largest economy, while reflecting on whether or not the bridge between the East and West might ever occur.

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Beyond the wall 06
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
03 Apr 2014

East German-Western 1960s period symbology including 20 year commemorative GDR (German Democratic Republic) Soviet issued envelope,1969.

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Beyond the wall 10
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
27 Mar 2014

GDR (German Democratic Republic) 40 year anniversary symbol with period postcards and news clipping of the era. Berlin Wall will open one month after this anniversary passes marking the end of the country's existence.

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Beyond the wall 22
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
30 Jun 2005

Former East-West Berlin Wall border demarcation, These identifiers are all that remain throughout the city besides certain remnants remaining as tributary reminders of an extraordinary history within the country within a relatively short period.

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Beyond the wall 21
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
30 Jun 1998

Rapid construction on a grand scale appeared rampant throughout the new Berlin during the 1990s period, depicted here with the rise of the new Reichstag German parliament during summer of 1998.

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Beyond the wall 19
Leipzig, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
31 May 1995

As Western product placement enveloped a formerly unapproachable part of the world soon after the opening of the Berlin Wall and subsequent reunification of Germany, contrasts arose as one social structure overtook another. A young family is pressed against the dynamics of a disappearing social safety net as the seeming attraction of consumerism with uncertain economic variables coincide. Certainly at the onset, the psychological need for incentive to thrive became a formidable challenge within the context of an entire country that had not previously engaged that system. Twenty five years later, eastern Germany has still not recovered from the promises of Western unification.

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Beyond the wall 12
Gorlitz, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
31 Jul 1990

In southeast Germany, Gorlitz borders Poland and in 1990 remained untouched and forgotten both during the war and for decades since, providing an eerie impression of the country's neglected infrastructure. Today it is fully modernized and renovated.

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Beyond the wall 14
Spandauer Str./Marienkirche, Berlin, 10178 Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
31 May 1990

Tile mural of propagandized East German Socialist benefits remained in East Berlin before Western consumerism values supplanted the new implemented direction.

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Beyond the wall 17
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
31 May 1990

Dismantled sections of the Berlin Wall during pre-reunification summer of 1990; former East Berlin, Germany.

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Beyond the wall 20
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
31 May 1990

A collision of time periods and cultures arose within former East Berlin in summer 1990 during a short transition between not yet dismantled sections of the Berlin Wall positioned near newly introduced Western advertisement billboards. German reunification would occur on 3 October later that year.

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Beyond the wall 18
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
31 Dec 1989

Evident replacement of consumer tastes appears in humorous advertisement depicting post-Soviet era passage towards assimilated Western values.

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Beyond the wall 16
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
22 Dec 1989

The Brandenburg Gate had an historic opening on 23 December 1989 ending 28 years of barbed wire seclusion positioned between the main borders of East and West Germany. Today it is a thriving international symbol and meeting point.

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Beyond the wall 15
Leipzig, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
04 Dec 1989

Weekly Monday night protests throughout late 1989 in Leipzig became infamous across former East Germany as a specter that the communist government had only weeks remaining before the Berlin Wall would ultimately open on 9 November. Leipzig held several 25th anniversary commemoration events during October 2014.

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Beyond the wall 07
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
30 Nov 1989

Berlin Wall with still occupied sentry tower 3-4 weeks after opening; seen from within East Berlin, early December 1989.

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Beyond the wall 11
Bitterfeld, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
30 Nov 1989

Lignite coal miner in central GDR; once considered the most polluted region in Eastern Europe, Bitterfeld, Germany today has become a region for solar energy development plus tourism; December 1989.

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Beyond the wall 13
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
30 Nov 1989

Time seemed to stop in former East Germany before the opening of the Berlin Wall occurred which abruptly opened the borders to the Western world of commerce. The impenetrable barriers between then Soviet central command ideologies against free market values extended between 1961-1989 when the wall was unexpectedly erected on 13 August 1961 then modified over a 28 year period until its final breach on 9 November 1989.

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Beyond the wall 08
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
30 Nov 1989

Berlin Wall with still patrolled though no longer enforced death strip one month after opening; immediately seen from outside Western border looking into Eastern sector, early December 1989.

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Beyond the wall 09
Berlin, Germany
By Steve Weinberg
01 Apr 1983

Berlin Wall, East Berlin, 1983; six years before its historic dismantling.