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ITALY -ROME- REFUGEES- EVICTION
Rome
By Christian Minelli
24 Aug 2017

Italy, Rome: A woman fells on ground after being hit by a water cannon used to disperse refugees who were evicted from a palace in the center of Rome on August 24, 2017. The UN's refugee agency (UNHCR) voiced "grave concern" over the eviction of 800 people from a Rome building squatted mainly by asylum seekers and refugees from Eritrea and Ethiopia. Almost 200 people expelled from the building sleep on the streets from 19 of August.

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Ecuador resumes normal life after ear...
Pedernales
By Cristina Muñoz
15 May 2016

One month after Pedernales 7.8 earthquake, in Ecuador's coast, almost 30,000 victims try to find normality for their lives.
Though the Ecuadorian government had implemented 19 official shelters, with the aid of ACNHUR, Red Cross and friendly countries, some have decided to stay on improvised camps.
These towns, mostly inhabited by humble fishermen, will take years to rebuilt, while they turn their hopes on God. On May 16th, moved by the Catholic tradition, requiem masses will take place all over the coastal cities to remember the 660 deaths and 40 missing people

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Interview with UNHCR's Antonio Guterres
New York
By Tracey Shelton
29 Sep 2015

Interview with Antonio Guterres, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and actor Ger Duany, UN Goodwill ambassador, on September 29, 2015. Private interview with UN Foundation fellows.

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 4
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

Living spaces for recently arrived refugees from Kobane in the Darashakran refugee Camp on 24 June 2015

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 6
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

Children playing in front of one of the more permanent settlements in the Darashakran refugee camp on 24 June 2015

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 7
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

Boy staring at the distribution taking place in the Darashakran refugee camp on 24 June 2015

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 8
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

Two boys dragging a small cart with goods for a woman from the distribution area to her home in Darashakran refugee camp on 24 June 2015

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 9
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

An old woman carries a box from the distribution area to her home through the heat along an empty street in Darashakran refugee Camp on 24 June 2015.

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 2
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Jun 2015

A woman waiting to receive items at distribution area in Darashakran refugee camp in the Kurdish Region of Iraq on 24 June 2015

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 3
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
23 Jun 2015

Two girls with a younger brother among the tents of Basirma refugee Camp in the Kurdish Region of Iraq on 23 June 2015.

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A Refugee Camp in Iraq 5
Darashakran Camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
By Noe Falk Nielsen
23 Jun 2015

Children playing among the tents in Basirma refugee camp on 23 June 2015.

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Global Refugee Crisis: The Worst Sinc...
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
11 Jun 2015

June 20 is World Refugee Day.

In 2014, global refugee numbers were higher than they have ever been since World War II. In 2015, the problem has only gotten worse.

There are currently over 50 million refugees in the world and more than %50 of them are children. Approximately half of the world's refugees are from just three countries: Afghanistan, Syria, and Somalia.

The response to this massive international crisis has been limited, with most refugee aid programs desperately underfunded. Amnesty International has called the lack of robust international response "A Conspiracy of Neglect." With little help on the way, the future of the world's displaced remains uncertain.

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Thai Migration Meeting 4
Bangkok, Thailand
By GonzaloAbad
05 Jun 2015

Photocall Special Meeting on Irregular Migration in the Indian Ocean on 29 May 2015 in Bangkok.

The Royal Thai Government is organizing the Special Meeting on Irregular Migration in the Indian Ocean on 29 May 2015 in Bangkok. The Special Meeting is an urgent call for the region to comprehensively work together to address the unprecedented increase of irregular migration in recent times.

The meeting will provide a forum to exchange information and views in addressing the unprecedented increase of irregular migration by sea. Senior officials responsibility for the issue from 17 countries in the region most affected by irregular migration by sea are expected to participate in the meeting, namely, Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and Thailand. In addition, the United States of America and Switzerland will participate as observers. Three international organizations, namely the UNHCR, UNODC, and IOM will also join the event.

The key topics of discussion will include:
1. Finding urgent solutions for the 7,000 irregular migrants estimated to be remaining in the Indian Ocean; 2. Finding long-term solutions to the problem of irregular migration in the Indian Ocean, particularly those related to human trafficking; 3. Addressing the challenges in countries of origin.
Key objectives of the meeting are:
1. Promote international cooperation in solving the problem, and engage key affected countries of origin, transit, and destination, considering that Thailand is a country of transit; 2. Emphasize the principle of international burden sharing; 3. Engage constructively with countries of origin and in the region.

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Thai Migration Meeting
Bangkok
By GonzaloAbad
29 May 2015

Mr. Robertson, Deputy Director Asia of Human Right Watch, speak with us about first impressions of "Thailand Migration Meeting" and migration.
Bangkok, 29 May 2015

The Royal Thai Government is organizing the Special Meeting on Irregular Migration in the Indian Ocean on 29 May 2015 in Bangkok. The Special Meeting is an urgent call for the region to comprehensively work together to address the unprecedented increase of irregular migration in recent times. 

The meeting will provide a forum to exchange information and views in addressing the unprecedented increase of irregular migration by sea. Senior officials responsibility for the issue from 17 countries in the region most affected by irregular migration by sea are expected to participate in the meeting, namely, Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and Thailand. In addition, the United States of America and Switzerland will participate as observers. Three international organizations, namely the UNHCR, UNODC, and IOM will also join the event.

The key topics of discussion will include:
1. Finding urgent solutions for the 7,000 irregular migrants estimated to be remaining in the Indian Ocean;
2. Finding long-term solutions to the problem of irregular migration in the Indian Ocean, particularly those related to human trafficking;
3. Addressing the challenges in countries of origin. 


Key objectives of the meeting are:
1. Promote international cooperation in solving the problem, and engage key affected countries of origin, transit, and destination, considering that Thailand is a country of transit;
2. Emphasize the principle of international burden sharing;
3. Engage constructively with countries of origin and in the region.

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Thailand Migration Meeting. Interview...
Bangkok, Thailand
By GonzaloAbad
29 May 2015

Mr. Robertson, Deputy Director Asia of Human Right Watch, speak with us about first impressions of "Thailand Migration Meeting" and migration.
Bangkok, 29 May 2015

The Royal Thai Government is organizing the Special Meeting on Irregular Migration in the Indian Ocean on 29 May 2015 in Bangkok. The Special Meeting is an urgent call for the region to comprehensively work together to address the unprecedented increase of irregular migration in recent times.

The meeting will provide a forum to exchange information and views in addressing the unprecedented increase of irregular migration by sea. Senior officials responsibility for the issue from 17 countries in the region most affected by irregular migration by sea are expected to participate in the meeting, namely, Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and Thailand. In addition, the United States of America and Switzerland will participate as observers. Three international organizations, namely the UNHCR, UNODC, and IOM will also join the event.

The key topics of discussion will include:
1. Finding urgent solutions for the 7,000 irregular migrants estimated to be remaining in the Indian Ocean; 2. Finding long-term solutions to the problem of irregular migration in the Indian Ocean, particularly those related to human trafficking; 3. Addressing the challenges in countries of origin.
Key objectives of the meeting are:
1. Promote international cooperation in solving the problem, and engage key affected countries of origin, transit, and destination, considering that Thailand is a country of transit; 2. Emphasize the principle of international burden sharing; 3. Engage constructively with countries of origin and in the region.

Mr. Robertson, Deputy Director Asia of Human Right Watch, speak with us about first impressions of "Thailand Migration Meeting" and migration.
Bangkok, 29 May 2015.

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Thailand Migration Meeting. Press Con...
Bangkok, Thailand
By GonzaloAbad
29 May 2015

Press Conferent General Tanasak Patimapragorn, Deputy Thai Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs.

The Royal Thai Government is organizing the Special Meeting on Irregular Migration in the Indian Ocean on 29 May 2015 in Bangkok. The Special Meeting is an urgent call for the region to comprehensively work together to address the unprecedented increase of irregular migration in recent times.

The meeting will provide a forum to exchange information and views in addressing the unprecedented increase of irregular migration by sea. Senior officials responsibility for the issue from 17 countries in the region most affected by irregular migration by sea are expected to participate in the meeting, namely, Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and Thailand. In addition, the United States of America and Switzerland will participate as observers. Three international organizations, namely the UNHCR, UNODC, and IOM will also join the event.

The key topics of discussion will include:
1. Finding urgent solutions for the 7,000 irregular migrants estimated to be remaining in the Indian Ocean; 2. Finding long-term solutions to the problem of irregular migration in the Indian Ocean, particularly those related to human trafficking; 3. Addressing the challenges in countries of origin.
Key objectives of the meeting are:
1. Promote international cooperation in solving the problem, and engage key affected countries of origin, transit, and destination, considering that Thailand is a country of transit; 2. Emphasize the principle of international burden sharing; 3. Engage constructively with countries of origin and in the region.

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Thai Migration Meeting 1
Bangkok, Thailand
By GonzaloAbad
29 May 2015

Meeting room "Thai Migration Meeting".

The Royal Thai Government is organizing the Special Meeting on Irregular Migration in the Indian Ocean on 29 May 2015 in Bangkok. The Special Meeting is an urgent call for the region to comprehensively work together to address the unprecedented increase of irregular migration in recent times.

The meeting will provide a forum to exchange information and views in addressing the unprecedented increase of irregular migration by sea. Senior officials responsibility for the issue from 17 countries in the region most affected by irregular migration by sea are expected to participate in the meeting, namely, Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and Thailand. In addition, the United States of America and Switzerland will participate as observers. Three international organizations, namely the UNHCR, UNODC, and IOM will also join the event.

The key topics of discussion will include:
1. Finding urgent solutions for the 7,000 irregular migrants estimated to be remaining in the Indian Ocean; 2. Finding long-term solutions to the problem of irregular migration in the Indian Ocean, particularly those related to human trafficking; 3. Addressing the challenges in countries of origin.
Key objectives of the meeting are:
1. Promote international cooperation in solving the problem, and engage key affected countries of origin, transit, and destination, considering that Thailand is a country of transit; 2. Emphasize the principle of international burden sharing; 3. Engage constructively with countries of origin and in the region.

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Thai Migration Meeting 2
Bangkok, Thailand
By GonzaloAbad
29 May 2015

Stage of "Thai Migration Meeting"

The Royal Thai Government is organizing the Special Meeting on Irregular Migration in the Indian Ocean on 29 May 2015 in Bangkok. The Special Meeting is an urgent call for the region to comprehensively work together to address the unprecedented increase of irregular migration in recent times.

The meeting will provide a forum to exchange information and views in addressing the unprecedented increase of irregular migration by sea. Senior officials responsibility for the issue from 17 countries in the region most affected by irregular migration by sea are expected to participate in the meeting, namely, Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and Thailand. In addition, the United States of America and Switzerland will participate as observers. Three international organizations, namely the UNHCR, UNODC, and IOM will also join the event.

The key topics of discussion will include:
1. Finding urgent solutions for the 7,000 irregular migrants estimated to be remaining in the Indian Ocean; 2. Finding long-term solutions to the problem of irregular migration in the Indian Ocean, particularly those related to human trafficking; 3. Addressing the challenges in countries of origin.
Key objectives of the meeting are:
1. Promote international cooperation in solving the problem, and engage key affected countries of origin, transit, and destination, considering that Thailand is a country of transit; 2. Emphasize the principle of international burden sharing; 3. Engage constructively with countries of origin and in the region.

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Thai Migration Meeting 3
Bangkok, Thailand
By GonzaloAbad
29 May 2015

Special Meeting on Irregular Migration in the Indian Ocean on 29 May 2015 in Bangkok.

The Royal Thai Government is organizing the Special Meeting on Irregular Migration in the Indian Ocean on 29 May 2015 in Bangkok. The Special Meeting is an urgent call for the region to comprehensively work together to address the unprecedented increase of irregular migration in recent times.

The meeting will provide a forum to exchange information and views in addressing the unprecedented increase of irregular migration by sea. Senior officials responsibility for the issue from 17 countries in the region most affected by irregular migration by sea are expected to participate in the meeting, namely, Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Iran, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Vietnam and Thailand. In addition, the United States of America and Switzerland will participate as observers. Three international organizations, namely the UNHCR, UNODC, and IOM will also join the event.

The key topics of discussion will include:
1. Finding urgent solutions for the 7,000 irregular migrants estimated to be remaining in the Indian Ocean; 2. Finding long-term solutions to the problem of irregular migration in the Indian Ocean, particularly those related to human trafficking; 3. Addressing the challenges in countries of origin.
Key objectives of the meeting are:
1. Promote international cooperation in solving the problem, and engage key affected countries of origin, transit, and destination, considering that Thailand is a country of transit; 2. Emphasize the principle of international burden sharing; 3. Engage constructively with countries of origin and in the region.

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Yemeni Refugees Seek Refuge in Djibouti
Djibouti
By Edouard Dufrasne
18 Apr 2015

Refugees fleeing the deadly conflict in Yemen seek refuge in Djibouti, ferried across the the Gulf of Aden by humanitarian workers and local ships. The UNHCR estimates that over 30,000 will end up in their camp in the north of Djibouti alone.

One refugee woman speaks of her journey, and how the current situation in the Middle East has forced her to move with her disabled husband and three children three times: from Aleppo where they all lived - now one of the areas of the fiercest fighting in Syria's civil war - to the Yarmuk Palestinian refugee camp outside Damascus - recently under attack both by Assad's forces and Islamic State militants - to Aden, where the ongoing conflict in Yemen once again displaced her family.

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Syrian Kurds Seek Refuge in Istanbul
Istanbul
By Arianna Pagani
14 Apr 2015

After the outbreak of war in Syria in 2012, a large part of the Kurdish population of Rojava in Syrian Kurdistan has sought shelter in Turkey. Many of these refugees passed at first through refugee camps in eastern Turkey and left due to the harsh conditions. Others succeeded to enter Turkey otherwise and to make their own way to major cities. The situation for refugees in Istanbul shows two distinct tendencies. For Syrians, refugees of war are given what is called "temporary protection," which involves more help from the government, while for Kurds, the government of Turkey offers what it calls "temporary asylum." 

In a wide spectrum of refugees with greater or lesser economic capacity, some have found accommodation in neighborhoods with Kurdish communities already present, while other parts of the refugee community have been forced to squat abandoned buildings. To start the asylum process requires an application to the Turkish government and a separate one to the UNHCR (for recognition of refugee status), however some do not posess the necessary identification to even begin. A high percentage of refugees in Istanbul arrived in the city directly from the refugee camps along the Turkey-Syria border. They have less opportunities and greater chances of being arrested by the authorities and being sent back to the camps.

People living in the poorest neighborhoods, such as Tarlablaşı, which extends nearly down to the main tourist streets of the city of Istanbul, are now confronted with a new restructuring plan implemented by the government of Prime Minister Erdogan. The continuous flow of refugees who come to Turkey from Syria, and the difficulties Kurdish refugees face in being recognized as asylum seekers by the Turkish government indicate a situation that is far from ending.

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Syrians Scrape A Living in Jordan (3 ...
65,Jordan
By Camilla Schick
12 Mar 2015

LEAD-IN MATERIAL
As Syria’s civil war enters its fifth year, nine million people have been displaced, with 3.7 million of those having fled the country. Millions of Syrian refugees are scraping by in neighboring countries.

Jordan has registered 600,000 refugees – constituting almost 10% of the Hashemite Kingdom’s total population of 6.6 million, though the actual number may be much higher. One fifth now live in refugee camps, including Za'atari camp, the second largest in the world. It's illegal for them to leave Jordan's now overcrowded and increasingly insecure refugee camps, but many are now making the leap to urban areas, seeking work and a better life. Some Syrian families who fled to Jordan at the start of the war are fairing better than others who've arrived more recently. But they’re still struggling to survive beyond the camps, without enough allowance from the UN nor local charities to pay for food and medical care, or taking their chances with working illegally.

Despite not being legally entitled to work, many have taken up jobs at local shops at the discretion of Jordanian employers, while others are too afraid to leave their homes and are surviving on as little as 13 dinars ($18) per person per month from the UN.

UN REPORT
A recent UNHCR urban report, entitled ‘Living in the Shadows’ in January this year, based on 150,000 Syrian refugees living outside of Jordan’s camps, concluded that two thirds of the refugees now in urban areas are living below Jordan’s poverty line. 1/6 are living in abject poverty barely surviving off the equivalent of 1.3 dollars per person per day. The UN has expressed grave concern that refugees are now turning desperate measures to make ends meet, with children dropping out of school and even women turning to prostitution.

JORDAN VALLEY
Khatah is a father in a community of more than 35 Syrian refugees living in UNHCR provided tents in the Jordan Valley by the Israeli border. Some of them have been living like this for 2-3 years. Most are young children. They try to earn some money working irregular days on the farms nearby, but it's not nearly enough to cover medical fees, food, and other expenses. One woman is heavily pregnant with her baby due fifteen days ago, while other adults are suffering stress and chronic illness. Khatah explains he cannot afford to pay 40-50 dinars per ID card for his family of 19 people. He wishes the fighting would stop in Syria and that they would all be able to return to them homeland one day.

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Syrians Scrape a Living in Jordan (1 ...
Jarash
By Camilla Schick
12 Mar 2015

As Syria’s civil war enters its fifth year, nine million people have been displaced, with 3.7 million of those having fled the country. Millions of Syrian refugees are scraping by in neighboring countries.

Jordan has registered 600,000 refugees – constituting almost 10% of the Hashemite Kingdom’s total population of 6.6 million, though the actual number may be much higher. One fifth now live in refugee camps, including Za'atari camp, the second largest in the world. It's illegal for them to leave Jordan's now overcrowded and increasingly insecure refugee camps, but many are now making the leap to urban areas, seeking work and a better life. Some Syrian families who fled to Jordan at the start of the war are fairing better than others who've arrived more recently. But they’re still struggling to survive beyond the camps, without enough allowance from the UN nor local charities to pay for food and medical care, or taking their chances with working illegally.

Despite not being legally entitled to work, many have taken up jobs at local shops at the discretion of Jordanian employers, while others are too afraid to leave their homes and are surviving on as little as 13 dinars ($18) per person per month from the UN.

UN REPORT
A recent UNHCR urban report, entitled ‘Living in the Shadows’ in January this year, based on 150,000 Syrian refugees living outside of Jordan’s camps, concluded that two thirds of the refugees now in urban areas are living below Jordan’s poverty line. 1/6 are living in abject poverty barely surviving off the equivalent of 1.3 dollars per person per day. The UN has expressed grave concern that refugees are now turning desperate measures to make ends meet, with children dropping out of school and even women turning to prostitution.

STORY:
This is the ancient Jordanian city of Jerash, 50 kilometres north of the capital Amman. It’s now home to approximately 8,000 Syrian refugee families / 50,000 refugees.

34-year-old Ali and his younger brother Mohammed work shifts at a local coffee and tea shop. Living as refugees has put a huge strain on Ali's marriage, and he is now separated from his wife, and rarely gets to see his young son. He says they used to live in Al Midan, an affluent Sunni suburb of Syria’s capital Damascus. But when fighting between the Assad government forces and Syrian rebels began in their neighborhood, the family took the heart-wrenching decision to prepare to leave the country. Being the eldest, Ali headed to Jordan first to set things up for the rest of the family. Mohammed and his parents followed after.

The brothers live with their mother Yusra, who warmly invites us into their two-bedroom one-floor home. Yusra was recently widowed. Their father died of health complications shortly after joining them in Jordan. They know how terrible the living conditions are for those now living in Jordan’s over-crowded refugee camps. They tell us they consider themselves among the luckier refugees, who arrived in Jordan almost four years ago at the start of the conflict, having found work and a place to live.

Jordanian shop owner Khaled says he hired the brothers not only because Syrians will work for a lower wage, but also because he wants to help the refugees who are desperately seeking work. He says the Jordanian authorities are fairly lax when it comes to illegal refugee workers. He says all Arabs are brothers, and need to help Syrians until its safe enough for them to return home.

NOTES
We chose to focus the interview on the elder brother – Ali
Their mother, Yusra, did not want us to film her face

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Lebanese Snowstorm Adds to Misery of ...
Aarsal
By TTM Contributor 32
19 Feb 2015

Set largely against a bleak grey sky, this video sheds light on the rough conditions in which many are forced to spend the winter months in Ersal, a northern Lebanese town with a large population of Syrian refugees that's long since been troubled with spillover from the civil war next door. The scene of major clashes between the Lebanese government and Al-Nusra/ISIS in August 2014, the video reveals the town's struggles to cope with harsh winter conditions such as strong wind and snow storms.

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Iraqi Refugees Desperate for Healthcare
Diyala
By mushtaq mohammed
09 Dec 2014

November 9, 2014
Khanaqin, Diyala, Iraq

Refugees in the UNHCR camp, near the town of Khanaqin, are living in life threatening conditions. They were promised free check ups and treatment by the local government and NGOs but have so far received none. Forced to flee their homes in Mosul and other parts of the Nineveh province, after ISIS took over vast areas of northern Iraq, many of the refugees require urgent medical attention or suffer from incurable diseases. In desperation, some are using what little money they have for appointments with independent doctors who charge 1500 Iraqi Dinars ($1.30) just for a check up.

Transcription:

Um Majed, refugee, (Woman, Arabic):
(02:06-02:28) "I am a refugee from al-Saadeya, al-Asreya village. We fled five months ago. We were not offered any doctors or medication. I am sick and I have a slipped disc in my spinal chord. I cannot afford to go to a doctor. My husband had a stroke two years ago, we have to buy his medications for 4000-5000 Dinar ($3-4) a box and we cannot afford it. Nobody has came to check on us."

Mustafa, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:06-03:33) "I am a sick man, I suffer from five illnesses. I have had a heart attack and a stroke, I have diabetes, hight blood pressure and asthma. I suffer from so many diseases and we are here in the camp. We have no medication. My five year-old son has diabetes, it started six months ago, ever since the problems started."

Abdulqader, refugee, (Man, Arabic):
(03:59-04:22) "If a doctor comes here, he charges 1500 Dinar ($1.30), We ask him to minimize the charge, he says that he has official receipts form the health directory of Diala. For chronic diseases he charges 1500 Dinar. How can people afford that? The doctor writes the prescription, and without providing any medications, he charges 1500 Dinar. None of the refugees have an income to afford that."

Abu Mohamed, refugee, (Man, Arabic): (04:44-04:56) "I have been running to help my daughter who is sick. I took her to the health care unit, and they have no medication. I spent over 40,000 Dinar ($35) on my sick daughters, all of them are sick."

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The Last Refugees in Choucha, Tunisia...
Choucha
By Filippo Del Bubba
16 Oct 2014

October 16, 2014
Choucha Refugee Camp, Southern Tunisia

The UNHCR Choucha Refugee Camp opened in 2011, seven kilometres away from the Ras Ajdir border crossing, to help the thousands of people fleeing the conflict in Libya. Most of the those who fled in 2011, returned home, but some 4,000 could not go back for fear of persecution. These individuals were granted refugee status by the UNHCR. Tunisia did not – and still does not – consider applicants for refugee status. According to UNHCR, most of the refugees from Choucha have already been taken by the United States (1,717) and Norway (485). The EU has been fairly strict on resettlement; Germany took the most refugees at 201, Britain took three, Italy two and France one. However, some still remain as they have nowhere else to go.
The Choucha camp was officially closed in June 2013, but approximately one hundred refugees still remain there. They insisted on remaining in the camp after it was closed despite the fact that all UNHCR food, water, and medical services were cut-off on June 30. 260 of the camp’s inhabitants, categorized as “rejected asylum seekers,” now find themselves in a dire situation. Falling outside of the UNHCR’s mandate, they are not entitled to the integration services that the organization offers to refugees and asylum seekers. The last time that the rejected asylum seekers here received food distribution aid was in October 2012. One of them is Bright O Samson, who is fighting against eviction from the camp, and is demanding resettlement to a safe third country with effective system of asylum seeker protection. Ismail is from Sudan and he fled to Libya in 2003 due to the war in his country. There, he found peace and a job as a mechanic, but the 2011 uprising forced him to leave again and cross the border into Tunisia. With no official structure supporting them, Ismail and other refugees from Chad, Ghana, Sudan, Liberia, and many other African countries, say they feel like they've been totally abandoned.

Full 30 minute video available: http://www.transterramedia.com/media/49074

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Along the roads of the city, in buildings still under construction, you can see hundreds of groups of Yazidis looking for shelter, creating shelters inside the skeletons of buildings, awaiting humanitarian aid. This situation is especially difficult for children and the elderly.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Diyarbakir, Turkey
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

One part of the Yazidi community has been able to pass through the border in northern Iraq with Turkey. The city of Diyarbakir, a Kurdish-majority city, has opened two schools to assist refugees with first aid provided by local associations. The number of refugees within this structure is about 700 people.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Bardarash, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

For the Iraqi woman who finds herself with dependent children and without a male figure at her side, security becomes a constant worry in addition to the emotional and psychological destruction visited on them by the Islamic State. Keeping in touch with friends and relatives helps distract them and maintain a sense of community.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The living conditions of minorities persecuted by the advance of Islamic State militants can be read on the faces of refugees no matter their age. Despite this extreme hardship, the hope that their children will be able to build a better future keeps them going.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Rovia, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Forced migration is in some cases synonymous with survival. These women were found after escaping from an armed group. Young and old, none of them are safe, they say.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

During mealtime, volunteers bring sandwiches and water to refugees. Children play, running between the reinforced concrete pillars of the bridge, left to themselves. The refugees here are waiting for the Duhok municipality to place them in a refugee camp.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Yazidi refugees from the €‹Sinjar area live under bridges along one of the main arteries in Duhok. Sulayman, 42, had a hard escape. He is the only one who speaks English and has managed to keep open relations with humanitarian organizations monitoring the situation where women have no privacy and the water is retrieved from a nearby mosque.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Yazidi refugees tend to move in groups according to their city of origin. Some hotels offer rooms at a fixed cost. In this Hotel refugees pay 600 Iraqi dinars per month no matter now many people reside in the room. Those with the means may even request air conditioning and fresh water.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Lalish, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

A temple sacred to the Yazidi is used as a shelter by refugees arriving from Mount Sinjar. The checkpoints and militarization of the place does not calm their fears that future attacks by the Islamic State can take place. Every inch of the stone temple donning Yazidi symbols of worship is used to shelter a trembling people.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The days become monotonous, as the women constantly prepare meals, clean dishes and wash clothes. The rest of the time the mind is free to worry about what might still happen and get lost in the melancholy of a sectarian war in progress.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Many Yazidi mothers have lost their children on the way to escape from Mount Sinjar during the advance of the Islamic State militia in the plain of Nineveh, but life must go on in spite of the constant pain and the uncertainty of their future.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

After two hundred Yazidi women were kidnapped and converted to Islam to be sold by IS militants, the Yazidi community worries that it can happen again, visible scars on the community of the women who were persecuted.

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Flee, protect and resist: Iraqi women...
Duhok, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Arsalam, 38, is the father of 5 children, including two newborn twins. His family comes from Bashiqua and hosts 24 people in 2 rooms of their hotel. Insecurity is always present on the faces of the guests who do not feel at home, even though they are certainly better off than those refugees who are forced to stay on the streets.