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Immigrants in Greece celebrate Nowruz...
Athens, Greece
By giorgos33
23 Mar 2013

Immigrants in Greece celebrate the Nowruz, the Persian New Year, in the Panionios Stadium of Athens

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Immigrants in Greece celebrate Nowruz...
Athens, Greece
By giorgos33
23 Mar 2013

Immigrants in Greece celebrate the Nowruz, the Persian New Year, in the Panionios Stadium of Athens

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Immigrants in Greece celebrate Nowruz...
Athens, Greece
By giorgos33
23 Mar 2013

Immigrants in Greece celebrate the Nowruz, the Persian New Year, in the Panionios Stadium of Athens

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Immigrants in Greece celebrate Nowruz...
Athens, Greece
By giorgos33
23 Mar 2013

Immigrants in Greece celebrate the Nowruz, the Persian New Year, in the Panionios Stadium of Athens

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Immigrants in Greece celebrate Nowruz...
Athens, Greece
By giorgos33
23 Mar 2013

Immigrants in Greece celebrate the Nowruz, the Persian New Year, in the Panionios Stadium of Athens

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Celebrating Nowruz In Greece
Athens, Greece
By U.S. Editor
23 Mar 2013

Immigrants in Greece celebrate the Nowruz, the Persian New Year, in the Panionios Stadium of Athens

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Newroz in Kurdistan (30 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Two women pose with the PKK infront of a celebrational fire at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (28 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Women preform a ritual Kurdish dance at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (27 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Women preform a ritual Kurdish dance at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (26 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Men play traditional instruments at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (25 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Kurds celebrate Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (24 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Women dance at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (23 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Women dance at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (20 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Women pose for a portrait at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (19 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Women pose for a portrait at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (15 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Boys chant under a Kurdish flag at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (11 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

A concert of traditional Kurdish music is held at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (9 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

A concert of traditional Kurdish music is held at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (5 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

The crowd gathers behind a flag of Abdullah Öcalan, the imprisioned PKK leader at a concert of traditional Kurdish music is held at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (3 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

A girl poses in a traditional dress at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (2 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Crowds climb trees to see the concert at Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

At Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (1 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

The current mayor of Batman, Serhat Temel standing below a poster of Nejdet Atalay the imprisioned former mayor of Batman, Turkey.

At Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Newroz in Kurdistan (22 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
14 Mar 2013

Women dance at a festival for Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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Brazilian Beach
Barra Grande
By Ralf Falbe
05 Jan 2013

Beach scene in Barra Grande, Bahia, Brazil.

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The Pilgrimage (6 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

Narrow tunnels underneath the churches and within the mountain connect the churches, and as the number of pilgrims swell dramatically with Christmas approaching, the passages become an increasingly tight traverse. Stories of long treks echo off the cool stone, with one pilgrim sharing a story of his group's barefoot journey of more than 8 days in order to reach Lalibela. As so many villages are within reach, more than 60,000 pilgrims descend on the churches each Christmas. Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By U.S. Editor
29 Dec 2012

Perched high in the mountains of Northern Ethiopia, in the small town of Lalibela, Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Wrapped in shrouds of early morning mist and cotton, Ethiopian Orthodox Christians stand in prayer at the edge of the rock church carved to resemble, what some believe is, Jerusalem. Ethiopian Orthodox Christianity is one of the only indigenous, pre-colonial Christian churches in Sub-Saharan Africa and still maintains its ancient rituals.

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Bethlehem, Christmas 2012 (2 of 6)
Bethlehem, Palestine
By Mat Wolf
25 Dec 2012

A shepherd tends his flocks on Christmas morning in Bethlehem.

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Bethlehem, Christmas 2012 (3 of 6)
Bethlehem, Palestine
By Mat Wolf
24 Dec 2012

A young boy dressed as Santa Claus sits in front of a nativity scene in Manger Square in Bethlehem, Palestine. December 24, 2012.

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India Celebrating Christmas Festival
News Delhi, India
By newspoint
24 Dec 2012

India - Christmas Festival Celebration
Byte in Hindi of Father:
“Joy of giving, its a special moment for us, we have a chance to celebrate Christmas in its true spirit. Its a small gesture by all people to express that they care for less privileged.”
News Agency: News Point TV
Shooting Dateline: December 25th 2012
Shooting Location: News Delhi (INDIA)
Publishing Time: December 25th 2012
Length: 0:7:01
Video Size: 189.1 MB
Language: Hindi

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London (1 of 10)
London, United Kingdom
By George Henton
16 Dec 2012

People dressed as Father Christmas gather at Trafalgar Square as part of the annual Santacon in London, United Kingdom, 15 December 2012. The annual event, which has been running since 2000, comprised of over 1000 men and women dressed in festive outfits. GEORGE HENTON.

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World's Largest Christmas Tree in Gub...
Gubbio, Italy
By Piergiorgio Pescali
08 Dec 2012

The World's largest Christmas tree has been lighted up in the Umbrian town of Gubbio, Italy. The tree has more than 800 lights powered by solar energy. Since 1991 the tree is enlisted in the Guinnes World Records

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World's Largest Christmas Tree in Gub...
Gubbio, Italy
By Piergiorgio Pescali
08 Dec 2012

The World's largest Christmas tree has been lighted up in the Umbrian town of Gubbio, Italy. The tree has more than 800 lights powered by solar energy. Since 1991 the tree is enlisted in the Guinnes World Records

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World's Largest Christmas Tree in Gub...
Gubbio, Italy
By Piergiorgio Pescali
08 Dec 2012

The World's largest Christmas tree has been lighted up in the Umbrian town of Gubbio, Italy. The tree has more than 800 lights powered by solar energy. Since 1991 the tree is enlisted in the Guinnes World Records

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Protest for Syria in Jordan (1 of 21)
Amman, Jordan
By Melissa Tabeek
26 Oct 2012

Men and women gather before the prayer begins for Eid al-Adha on October 26. About 300 people protested across the street from the Syrian Embassy in Amman, Jordan, calling for the fall of President Bashar al-Assad's regime.

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Skyrocketing Food Prices Ahead Of Mus...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
25 Oct 2012

Skyrocketing prices hit Egyptians ahead of the big Muslim holiday, the Feast of Sacrifice (Eid Al-Adha), particularly the prices of meat, vegetables and fruits, which Egyptians buy in exceptionally large quantities on this occasion.

Muslims in Egypt and worldwide buy sacrificial animals, whether a cow, ram, goat, etc, to slaughter on the first day of the Feast, known by Muslims as Eid, but those who cannot afford it just buy meat to cook and share with family members.

The kilogram of meat used to vary from 35 to 40 Egyptian pounds, but on these days it has exceeded 70 pounds, which is not affordable by a lot of Egyptians, 40% of which live under poverty line. [1 USD = 6.1 EGP]

Egyptian butchers complain that the difficult financial conditions of the people reflected in their selling.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ali Abdel-Tawwab, butcher, store owner:
“Selling is very weak and things are very quiet. The difficult financial conditions affect everything, the people and the market.”

Rising prices didn’t stop at meat, but the prices of vegetables and fruits also recorded notable increase.

Some vegetable and fruit sellers say that the Eid eve used to be a prime selling season before the revolution, and that this year the selling on this day is just like other days.

Egyptian customers now reduce the quantities of food they used to buy for such an occasion, whether it is meat, fruits or vegetables.

Some see that food prices are incredibly higher this year while others see that they are reasonable.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Fatima, woman, customer at the marketplace:
“Whether it is on Eid days or ordinary days, Food prices have become very expensive. It’s rather too expensive.”

A few hours before the big Muslim holiday kicks off, Egyptians, 90% of whom are Muslims, hope that the new president and his government fulfill their promises regarding improving people’s standard of living and financial conditions, boosting economy and reducing poverty.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 25, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 25, 2012
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot, a bridge and traffic in Cairo
2. Various shots at a butcher’s, butchers chopping and slicing meat, a customer waiting
3. Various shots of cows at a stockyard
4. Pan right, a man dragging a cow
5. Various shots of sheep at a stockyard in the street
6. Various shots of customers at a butcher’s
7. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ali Abdel-Tawwab, butcher, store owner:
“Selling is very weak and things are very quiet. The difficult financial conditions affect everything, the people and the market.” 8. Various shots of a marketplace of vegetables and fruits
9. Various shots of fruits displayed for sale on stands in the marketplace, including peaches, pineapples, mangoes, etc
10. Various shots of a fruit seller
11. Various shots of tomatoes, cucumbers, potatoes and other vegetables displayed for sale in the marketplace
12. Various shots of the vegetable seller
13. Long shot, people walking around at the marketplace
14. Various shots of a marketplace of vegetables and fruits displayed for sale
15. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Fatima, woman, customer at the marketplace:
“Whether it is on Eid days or ordinary days, Food prices have become very expensive. It’s rather too expensive.” 16. Pan right, an old man buying something at the marketplace
17. Long shot, people walking around at the marketplace

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DIFFICULT EID FOR SYRIANS & EGYPTIANS...
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
25 Oct 2012

Though Eid is a time for celebration, many Muslims are facing the challenges of economic struggles and war, dampening the holiday spirit. In Syria, families hope for a respite from the violence, while in Egypt storekeepers are hoping for business.

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After the Spring in Yemen (12 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
19 Aug 2012

Playful children the first day of Eid holidays dressing new clothes and handling bb guns in Old Sana'a. Yemen is the second most heavily armed society in the World after the United States.

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Jerusalem Day
Jerusalem, Israel
By collins.dyl
22 May 2012

Jerusalem, Israel | May 20, 2012

Over 35,000 Israelis gathered at the Western Wall on May 20, 2012, in celebration of "Jerusalem Day" - the day Israeli celebrate their take over, and occupation, of the the entirety of Jerusalem in 1967.

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Jerusalem Day Clashes
jerusalem, Israel
By collins.dyl
22 May 2012

Jerusalem, Israel | May 20, 2012

On May 20, 2012, Israelis participated in an annual celebration commemorating the occupation of the entirety of Jerusalem. Dubbed “Jerusalem Day,” the annual holiday marks the 1967 Israeli occupation of the East half of Jerusalem (not to mention that of the entire West Bank, Gaza Strip, Sinai Peninsula, and Golan Heights).

A march of over 35,000 Israelis processed from West Jerusalem down into and through Arab East Jerusalem, entering Damascus Gate and the old city, arriving to the Western Wall around 9 pm.

The Israel army and border police made serious efforts to quash any and all attempts by Palestinians, Israeli and international solidarity activists to stage counter protests in response to the Israeli occupation celebration. While, simultaneously, allowing young Israelis to congregate on the opposite side of the street, where they freely jeered Palestinian demonstrators, shouting slogans such as “There is no such thing as Palestine” and “Death to Arabs.”

Approximately 10-15 Palestinians were arrested for no particular reason other than chanting pro-Palestinian songs. Israeli police utilized 10 huge Danish Horses at crowd dispersal mechanisms, running through groups on the Palestinian side of the street, trampling demonstrators, shopkeepers, and members of the press.

Israel’s occupation of Arab East Jerusalem, as well as the West Bank and Gaza Strip, has been deemed illegal under international as well as numerous United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions.

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Jerusalem Day Clashes
Jerusalem, Israel
By collins.dyl
22 May 2012

Jerusalem, Israel | May 20, 2012

On May 20, 2012, Israelis participated in an annual celebration commemorating the occupation of the entirety of Jerusalem. Dubbed “Jerusalem Day,” the annual holiday marks the 1967 Israeli occupation of the East half of Jerusalem (not to mention that of the entire West Bank, Gaza Strip, Sinai Peninsula, and Golan Heights).

A march of over 35,000 Israelis processed from West Jerusalem down into and through Arab East Jerusalem, entering Damascus Gate and the old city, arriving to the Western Wall around 9 pm.

The Israel army and border police made serious efforts to quash any and all attempts by Palestinians, Israeli and international solidarity activists to stage counter protests in response to the Israeli occupation celebration. While, simultaneously, allowing young Israelis to congregate on the opposite side of the street, where they freely jeered Palestinian demonstrators, shouting slogans such as “There is no such thing as Palestine” and “Death to Arabs.”

Approximately 10-15 men, both Palestinian and Israeli, were arrested for no particular reason other than chanting pro-Palestinian songs. Israeli police utilized 10 huge Danish Horses at crowd dispersal mechanisms, running through groups on the Palestinian side of the street, trampling demonstrators, shopkeepers, and members of the press.

Israel’s occupation of Arab East Jerusalem, as well as the West Bank and Gaza Strip, has been deemed illegal under international as well as numerous United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions.