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Ukrainian Separatists Bury Their Dead...
20KM South of Donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Aug 2014

20KM South of Donetsk, Donbass, Ukraine. The two sisters and fellow soldiers of a fallen separatist fighter arrive at his burial ceremony.

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Ukrainian Separatists Bury Their Dead...
20KM South of Donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Aug 2014

20KM South of Donetsk, Donbass, Ukraine. At a burial ceremony, separatist soldiers mourn the loss of four fellow fighters who died in battle against Ukrainian army forces.

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Ukrainian Separatists Bury Their Dead...
20KM South of Donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Aug 2014

20KM South of Donetsk, Donbass, Ukraine. Separatist soldiers carry the coffin of a fallen soldier at his burial ceremony. He was a local from a small village South of Donetsk near the front lines.

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Ukrainian Separatists Bury Their Dead...
20KM South of Donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Aug 2014

20KM South of Donetsk, Donbass, Ukraine. A priest presides over the burial of four separatist soldiers.

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Ukrainian Separatists Bury Their Dead...
20KM South of Donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Aug 2014

20KM South of Donetsk, Donbass, Ukraine. Separatists help in the burial of one of their fallen soldiers as a priest presides over the ceremony.

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Ukrainian Separatists Bury Their Dead...
20KM South of Donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Aug 2014

20KM South of Donetsk, Donbass, Ukraine. Separatists pay their respect at the burial of four of their fallen soldiers.

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Ukrainian Separatists Bury Their Dead...
20KM South of Donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Aug 2014

20KM South of Donetsk, Donbass, Ukraine. A separatist soldier mourns the loss of a fellow fighter who died fighting Ukrainian forces near the front lines.

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Ukrainian Separatists Bury Their Dead...
20KM South of Donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Aug 2014

20KM South of Donetsk, Donbass, Ukraine. Separatists pay their respect at the burial of four of their fallen soldiers.

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Ukrainian Separatists Bury Their Dead...
20KM South of Donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Aug 2014

20KM South of Donetsk, Donbass, Ukraine. Relatives of fallen separatist soldiers held burry their dead as a priest presides over the ceremony.

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Ukrainian Separatists Bury Their Dead...
20KM South of Donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Aug 2014

20KM South of Donetsk, Donbass, Ukraine. Separatists pay their respect at the burial of four of their fallen soldiers.

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Ukrainian Separatists Bury Their Dead...
20KM South of Donetsk
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
17 Aug 2014

20KM South of Donetsk, Donbass, Ukraine. Relatives help bury four separatist soldiers who died fighting Ukrainian army forces in a small village South of Donetsk, near the front lines.

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Car Bomb Kills A Security Officer in ...
By TTM Contributor 12
23 Jun 2014

The aftermath of a bomb near an army checkpoint in Beirut, which left a general security officer dead and at least 12 more injured. General Security officer Abdel Karim Hodroj was killed in the blast caused by a suicide bomber. Many of those injured were football fans in a nearby café who were celebrating Brazil’s World Cup victory, moments before. The Lebanese army released a statement saying that the culprit was a Syrian man, driving a Mercedes rigged with 25 kg of explosives. The army then cordoned off the area so the military police could conduct an investigation. This is the second suicide bomb in three days after a blast at an army checkpoint in eastern Lebanon, killed two soldiers on Friday.

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War Relics Continue to Plague Vietnam
Quang Tri, Vietnam
By Sean Kimmons
02 Jun 2014

QUANG TRI PROVINCE, Vietnam – A demining team carefully removes a pile of rusty explosives – each one still able to kill or maim – from a quiet farm field where fierce fighting once raged during the Vietnam War.

Shortly after the lethal mortars and grenade launcher rounds were taken away, an anxious farmer in her 50s marched over to the de-mining team and expressed her frustration to everyone around.

“I’m afraid of more bombs but I need to work,” she said. “I have to risk death just to earn money.”

The farmer, Van Thi Nga, stumbled across the relics while growing vegetables, the main source of income in her village. Her village sits along the war’s former demarcation zone and is strewn with hidden explosives.

However, there was no time for sympathy as the busy team frankly told her to report other unexploded ordinance (UXO) if she sees more. The bomb disposal experts then did a brief sweep with a metal detector and left to their next call of duty: an unstable bomb in a nearby rice paddy.

De-mining teams in Vietnam face an epic task where roughly 20 percent of the country is littered with UXO. UXO includes everything from bombs, landmines, munitions, and other explosives.

This central Vietnamese province is the worst-hit region, with more than 80 percent of the land still peppered with deadly devices after nearly 350,000 tons of explosives were used.

In total, almost four times more firepower was deployed on Vietnam during the Vietnam War than in all of World War II.

Around 10 percent of the explosives used in the Vietnam War are believed to not have detonated. As a result, up to 800,000 tons of UXO remain in the communist state. That’s even beyond the 635,000 tons of bombs that US forces dropped in the entire Korean War.

“The contamination in Vietnam is huge,” said Portia Stratton, country director of Mine Advisory Group, the largest non-profit de-mining group in Vietnam. “We’re still finding the same number of UXO that we were finding [when we started here] 15 years ago.”

‘Lagging behind’

Introduced in 2010, Vietnam’s mine action strategy came years after other UXO-infested nations including its neighbors, Laos and Cambodia. which were also heavily bombed to jam communist supply routes in the war.

“Vietnam is lagging behind a lot of other countries that have significant levels of contamination,” Stratton said. “We still don’t have a full picture of what our efforts have achieved.”

Since the end of the war in 1975, war remnants have killed more than 42,000 Vietnamese and injured at least 62,000 others, according to preliminary statistics by the government.

But with no national database in place, UXO incidents and demining operations cannot be accurately tracked while affected remote areas go unnoticed, advocates say.

In March, the Vietnam National Mine Action Center was launched to provide more oversight in the secretive state, which already had similar mine action bodies at the national level.

Stratton warns that the new center may serve as another bureaucratic layer and further delay mine action services that often take up to one year to get government approval.

Middle-income blues

Despite its fondness for red tape, Vietnam has revived itself as one of the fastest-growing economies in Asia after devastating warfare with US forces.

In 2009, the country gained lower middle-income status but the distinction has created a sort of Catch-22 paradox as foreign donors redirect funds elsewhere.

“There’s more of a challenge now to enable us to secure funding,” said Rickard Hartmann, country director for APOPO, a Belgium-based demining group. “We are very happy that Vietnam is developing but at the same time more and more donors are reducing their support.”

The 50-member APOPO group began operations in January after the German non-profit Solidarity Service International pulled out its 160 personnel from the area, leaving a two-thirds reduction in skilled labor, he said.

Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung recently called on the global community to boost support saying that “since the explosive contamination is so great, Vietnam truly needs assistance and support.”

Vietnamese officials claim that $10 billion is required to completely rid existing UXO – a feat that would take up to 300 years for the country to do on its own, they say.

Around 35,000 hectares of unsafe land is cleared annually but the state has ambitious plans to nearly triple that target to 100,000 hectares if external aid is increased.

Yet the government spends about $80 million on mine action, or less than 0.20 percent of its national budget.

Deputy Minister of Vietnam’s Ministry of Planning and Investment Nguyen The Phuong admitted that the meager funds “could not meet the actual needs of mine action activities.”

He also cited poor coordination between state and provincial entities, lack of human resources, and technology and equipment shortages as other factors hindering progress.

A 2012 assessment on Vietnam’s mine action program, conducted by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Deming, revealed that the government and state-connected private investors bankrolled 92 percent of activities from 2007 to 2011.

The government currently expects foreign donors to cover about half of the estimated $368 million required for mine action from 2013 to 2015, according to a 2013 update on the national strategy.

But foreign donors only doled out $8.7 million for mine action in 2012, with the US contributing more than 40 percent of the total, the Landmine and Cluster Munition Monitor reported.

Vietnam may be entitled to more foreign aid if they signed the Mine Ban Treaty and the Convention on Cluster Munitions that prohibits their use.

Even so, landmines are seen as legitimate weapons for border security. Officials also reject the cluster bomb pact since the 10-year deadline for member states to finish land clearance is unrealistic to them, they said.

Ironically, cluster bombs would likely delay the country due to how they were dispersed in the war. Hundreds of cluster bombs – each about the size of a tennis ball – were packed inside large airdropped canisters that scattered the bomblets over wide swathes of the countryside.

Although designed to explode on impact, many of them did not.

Enlisting local help

To deal with the funding shortfalls, bomb experts rely on villagers to be their eyes and ears for war remnants.

“To clean up every bomb and mine in Vietnam is impossible,” said Hien Ngo, spokesperson for Project Renew, a demining group that also empowers locals. “It’s a daunting task that will never likely be achieved, so we want to make sure that the land is safe by educating people about the risks.”

Ngo has already seen the value of his group’s education programs that are taught in schools and to those who come to their mine action visitor center in the province’s largest city.

He recalled when a 12-year-old boy halted a crew driving to another call and led them to a cache of 180 explosives concealed in the dense jungle.

“The boy learned what to do after he visited the center,” he said. “Now people are helping us report explosives.”

Nguyen Xuan Tuan, 29, wished he knew the dangers of war relics before he scavenged for scrap metal at a deserted US military base back in 2002.

After his friend found something on a metal detector, Tuan sliced the ground with his shovel. But as he dug deeper, he struck a cluster bomb.

The blast severed his right hand, cut deep scars across his body and knocked him into a three-day coma.

“I woke up seeing my parents crying and I realized that I was in a miserable situation,” he said. “The only thing I could do was cry and think that this was the end of my life.”

Tuan, one of the nation’s five Ban Advocates that campaign against cluster bombs worldwide, is now using his experience to educate others throughout the province.

“I’ve been very lucky to be exposed to the outside world,” he said. “In rural areas, many voices are not being heard and people do not receive the assistance they need.”

By the end of 2015, Vietnam aims to develop a national database and expand risk education to the most dangerous areas.

The US also continues to be the top donor for mine action activities in Vietnam, giving over $62 million so far, officials say.

But 50 years after the US military drastically built up its presence to counter evasive communist fighters, Ngo said that both sides have failed to tackle the aftermath and must “step up” their efforts.

“Although we see positive developments to make the war’s legacy finally history, bombs and mines are still killing and injuring people,” he said.

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Disabled Evacuated From Homs
Homs, Syria
By Transterra Editor
14 Feb 2014

These are young men and opposition militants from the neighborhoods of old Homs after they were evacuated due to the agreement between the United Nations and the Syrian government. They are injured as a result of the clashes, as well as shelling and bombing by government forces, that left them permanently disabled. Some of them have lost limbs and are in critical condition.

The United Nations and the Syrian Red Crescent supervise their treatment in a school in the neighborhood of Al-Andalus, Dablan ,that is used as a shelter for the displaced from the old neighborhoods of Homs, after they get security clearance by the authorities.

مجموعة من الصور للشباب والرجال من مسلحي المعارضة من مسلحي أحياء حمص القديمة بعد الاتفاق بين الأمم المتحدة والحكومة السورية على خروجهم وهم مصابين نتيجة المعارك مع القوات الحكومية السورية والقصف المدفعي والطيران، على تلك الأحياء قصفا واشتباكات تسببت لهم بإعاقات دائمة والبعض منهم فقد طرفيه او احد أطرافه .. تقوم الأمم المتحدة والهلال الاحمر السوري بالأشراف على علاجهم في مدرسة الأندلس في حي الدبلان التي اتخذت كمركز إيواء للنازحين من أحياء حمص القديمة .. بعد تسوية أوضاعهم الأمنية من قبل السلطات السورية .. الصور بتاريخ

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Working Children In Wartime 5
Aleppo, Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
04 Feb 2014

A child sells an array of goods to support her family after losing her father in a bombing in an Aleppo neighborhood under opposition control.

طفلة في أحد أحياء حلب الخاضعة لسيطرة المعارضة تبيع بعض المواد لمساعدة أسرتها بعد مقتل والدها في القصف

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Working Children During Wartime 6
Aleppo, Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Feb 2014

Two children, residents of Aleppo, are forced to sell donuts on the street due to the war and economic collapse outside of government-controlled areas.

طفلان حلبيان أجبرتهما ظروف الحر وتعطل الحياة الاقتصادية على بيع الكعك في أحد أحياء حلب الخارجة عن سيطرة النظام

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October 6th Protests 5
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
06 Oct 2013

Protestors against military rule clash with security forces in Cairo's Dokki district. Heavy gunfire followed the use of tear gas, leading to the deaths of protestors.

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REDUCED TO RUBBLE: ALEPPO SCHOOLS & H...
Aleppo, Syria
By Editor's Picks
29 Nov 2012

A few short blocks from Dar al Shifaa hospital, destroyed just last week, an Aleppo school was also targeted by government forces, reducing the area to rubble in the early dawn.

Zachariah, a volunteer at the hospital told the photographer last October, "Even in the middle of death, happiness can still rise," in reference to his upcoming wedding with Bushra. The two had been married for about two weeks when she was killed. Now he spends his days alone in the ruins of the hospital, mourning his wife.

Fleeing ongoing violence, the sheer numbers of Syrian refugees have prompted Lebanon to request help from the UN to care for the displaced people.

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SPEAKING OF SYRIA - Editor's Picks 1...
Syria
By Editor's Picks
17 Sep 2012

In meetings and press conferences, everyone is talking about Syria and discussing possible solutions to the ongoing crisis. Egyptian President Morsi, along with Foreign Minister Kamel Amr, held talks with the Iranian, Turkish and French Foreign Ministers, touching on the increasing number of refugees, the fate of Bashar Al Assad and the "contact group," consisting of Egypt, Iran, Turkey and Saudi Arabia who have both influence and interest in the outcome of the crisis in Syria. Talks also gravitated toward the recent film on youtube that insulted the Prophet Mohammed and sparked massive protests among enraged Muslim communities.

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Cameraman, Killed on Lebanon-Syria Bo...
Mayfadoun, Lebanon
By Video Cairo Sat
10 Apr 2012

Beirut and Northern Lebanon | April 10, 2012

Reporters, cameramen and photographers representing local and foreign media channels gathered on Tuesday, April 10, outside the headquarters of Al-Jadeeed (New) TV, to bid a last farewell to slain cameraman Ali Shaaban of New TV, who was shot dead Monday at the Lebanese-Syrian borders.
Shaaban was taken from Beirut Governmental Hospital to the graveyard in his hometown, the southern village of Mayfadoun.
Shaaban's director attended the funeral receiving condolences over the death of his colleague, and denouncing the attack on the Lebanese media team.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) –Ibrahim al-Halaby, director at New TV,:
“New TV is always paying the tax for its courage and the courage of its reporters and cameramen in covering all kinds of events. We consider it a tax that we pay on behalf of all free media in Lebanon and the Arab world.” The victim’s funeral passed by the headquarters of the New TV building, heading later to the home of Shabaan's family, then proceeding to the graveyard in Mayfadoun.
Shaaban was reportedly killed by gunfire from the Syrian side of the Lebanese-Syrian border, in the Wadi Khaled region. The fellow occupants of the vehicle he was riding in were unharmed.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: April 10, 2012
Shooting Location: Beirut and Northern Lebanon
Publishing Time: April 10, 2012
Length: 0:02:13
Video Size: 100 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Tilt down external shot of New TV headquarters where the Lebanese martyr was working
2- Various shots of friends, colleagues of the martyrs
3- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) –Ibrahim al-Halaby, director at New TV,:
“New TV is always paying the tax for its courage and the courage of its reporters and cameramen in covering all kinds of events. We consider it a tax that we pay on behalf of all free media in Lebanon and the Arab world.” 4- Various shots of people carrying the coffin to the ambulance for burial
5- Medium shot of posters of the cameraman victim Ali Shaaban
6- Various shots of people during the funeral of Shaaban
7- Wide shot of a large banner, expressing regrets and condolences for the family of the victim “Hezbollah"
8- Wide shot of a large banner “ Aml Movement expressing condolences to al-Jdeed TV over the killing of Shaaban
9- Various shots of area at the south of Lebanon
10- Various shots of the damaged car which Shaaban was riding during the accident at northern of Lebanon

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Lebanese TV Cameraman Shot Dead at Sy...
Wadi Khaled, Lebanon
By Video Cairo Sat
09 Apr 2012

Beirut and Northern Lebanon | April 9, 2012

Lebanese TV cameraman Ali Shaaban was killed by gunfire from Syrian government forces along the Lebanese-Syrian border Monday, April 9.
Shaaban, a cameraman for Al-Jadeed TV station, was filming in Lebanon's northern Wadi Khaled area when a bullet pierced his chest, according to Lebanese security officials.
The cameraman's director collapsed upon hearing the news, and was taken to a hospital in Beirut.
Security officials were cited, saying the gunfire apparently came from the Syrian side of the border.
The cameraman was hurried to the nearby medical facility, Hospital Notre Dame de la Paix, but died during transport.
Shaaban’s colleague reported that their vehicle sustained significant damage, and that he heard heavy gunfire "falling like rain" all around them.
He demanded that the Lebanese government declare the area a military zone in order to prevent further recurrence of such incidents.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: April 9, 2012
Shooting Location: Beirut and Northern Lebanon
Publishing Time: April 9, 2012
Length: 0:01:37
Video Size: 80.2 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
Beirut
1- Wide external shot of New TV headquarters where the journalist worked
2- Various shots of the cameramen director taken by a trolley to an ambulance upon hearing the news of the killing of his cameraman
3- Various shots of the ambulance leaving
4- Various shots inside New TV headquarters, with the TV monitor displaying the news of the killed cameraman
5- Close up, from New TV Channel displayed on monitor showing live news about the death of the cameraman

Northern Lebanon, Akkar border area:
6- Medium shot, the shrouded dead body of the cameraman at a border hospital called "HOPITAL NOTRE DAME DE LA PAIX"
7- Medium shot, one of the shoes of the dead cameraman on the hospital floor
8- Close up, drops of blood on the hospital floor
9- Various shots of Abd Khayyat (in white t shirt), an accompanying cameraman, crying and weeping at the hospital over the death of his fellow cameraman
10- Various shots of the accompanying correspondent of the channel crying and weeping at the hospital over the death of the cameraman
11- Various shots of ambulance and Lebanese Red Cross men and reporters outside the hospital

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HD Interview With Volunteer Surgeon a...
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
04 Feb 2011

An interview with a volunteer doctor at a hospital that has been set up at a Mosque behind Tahrir square. The doctor explains that he is an emergency room surgeon who has been volunteering at this make-shift hospital for people who sustain injuries during the demonstrations. He gives a brief description of the organizers and other doctors in the hospital and how Egyptian citizens bring in supplies and medicine that they buy and donate to the cause. He says that he has personally confirmed three deaths during his two-day tenure at the hospital.

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White Cars, Friday, January 28, 2011
Cairo, Egypt
By Beirut Editor's Picks
27 Jan 2011

M. A. Photo: The protesters' response after a white van ran over demonstrators.