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For Clan and Country (8 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
18 Jul 2013

Hawd's sixth penalty flies wide of the post, handing Maroodi-Jeh a second-consecutive victory. Last year Hawd were also beaten finallists.

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For Clan and Country (6 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
18 Jul 2013

Maroodi-Jeh's jubilant players race to the touchlines in victory, as Hawd's beaten penalty-taker lays in anguish.

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For Clan and Country (12 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
18 Jul 2013

The trophy is held aloft as the sun sets over Hargeisa. "This game is huge for Somaliland," says minister of sport Abdi Saeed Raigal as a handful of stones clatter the stadium's corrugated roof. "Every year we will get better and better."

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For Clan and Country
Hargeisa, Somalia
By Serene Yordi
18 Jul 2013

Somaliland is the breakaway Somali state seeking independence after decades of bloody civil war and terror. Its capital city Hargeisa is booming, and expats are returning to start businesses after years in exodus.

But Somaliland is still deeply riven across clan lines, that often spill into violence which threaten its image as the peaceful antithesis of terror-torn Mogadishu, from whom the state clamours for independence.

Football may be the answer. And this year's year's 'Regional', aka 'Clan', Cup Final, which pitted two tribal groups from Hargeisa against each other amid a chaotic atmosphere in the capital's 15,000-plus capacity stadium, wasn't just a chance to play out tribal rivalries in peace. It was a statement that Somaliland can police itself and promote sport without help from Somalia, the UN or any other outsiders.

"Somaliland is desperate for recognition," says Jamal Alon, a British-Somalilander who helped organise this year's final. "It's days like this that show it can be recognised through football, and sport in general.

"This is Mo Farah's birthplace so there's tons of sporting talent here. Come to Hargeisa, see the city and bring your scouts!"

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For Clan and Country (2 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
18 Jul 2013

Security is tight as stick-wielding policemen keep punters in check. Previous years' finals have seen tribe-driven violence and stone-throwing.

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For Clan and Country (5 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
18 Jul 2013

The women's stand is awash with colour, as girls and older women in traditional dress wave national flags and scream support for their team.

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For Clan and Country (3 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
18 Jul 2013

The crowd, which doesn't swell to full-capacity until the second half, watches as the game slips into sudden-death penalties.

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For Clan and Country (9 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
18 Jul 2013

It's a tough day for Hawd's exhausted players, who also lost last year's final to their cross-town rivals.

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For Clan and Country (10 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
18 Jul 2013

A presenter reports pitch-side after the match. Last year's final drew just one local crew while this year seven TV stations covered the game - a sign of progress off the field in Somaliland.

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For Clan and Country (11 of 12)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By mcseaniew
18 Jul 2013

Maroodi-Jeh's captain receives the winners' trophy from Somaliland justice minister Hussein Ahmed Aided. "I'm supporting both teams," he says. "I'm the minister of justice - I have to be even-handed!"

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Immigrant Single Mothers, Invisible R...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
06 Jun 2013

Muna (random name), 39, lost the favour of her family after marrying a man from another tribal clan in Somalia. When her husband disappeared in 2010 both her family and her husband´s family tried to kill her. She fled in July 2011 and travelled to Bangkok but she had to leave her four children in her country. As a refugee, she started the process to be resettled.

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A Hole in the Wall
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By MediaMikeDC
17 May 2013

A view of a Somali house through a hole in the wall.

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African Union Forces in Somalia
Mogadishu
By Takeshi KUNO
14 Apr 2013

African Union forces continue to fight Al Shabab in Mogadishu and other parts of central Somalia. Security is a major problem for internally displaced persons, who often abandon their camps to find safer places to live. Formerly popular places such as Bakara market are now empty, except for fighting between African Union forces and Al Shabab.

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Somali women launch all-female radio ...
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Somali women have started their own radio station in Mogadishu, Somalia. Aman Radio broadcasts two hours daily and programs are based in basic situations in women's lives. The radio station employs dozens of women age 17-30. They also publish the first women's magazine in Somalia. This is a story of these ladies.

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A Fight for a Voice (15 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Lul, 21, is taking photos while Ubax, 19, interviews a shepherd.

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A Fight for a Voice (14 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

For Somali women, appearance of the hands are extremely important. Hands are one of the only things women can show in public.

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A Fight for a Voice (13 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Khadra is head of Somaliland's Sports and Culture organization, SOCSA. This powerful woman is one of the few public Somali female figures.

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A Fight for a Voice (12 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Ubax is taking photos of camels for her report on farm animal healthcare.

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A Fight for a Voice (11 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Tasniim, 17, records a conversation at a women's political workshop.

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A Fight for a Voice (10 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Tasniim, 17, and Farxia, 23, are looking through their photographs.

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A Fight for a Voice (9 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Fardowsa, 30, is learning image processing on Photoshop. She tries to forget her sorrow with her radio work. Her husband left her a year ago and took their children with him.

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A Fight for a Voice (6 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Faduma, 19, is looking to know why women cannot play football in Somalia even though it is a popular sport.

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A Fight for a Voice (8 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Aman Radio girls working beside Somaliland's national TV broadcaster.

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A Fight for a Voice (4 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Xodan, 18, takes a break outside the courthouse after interview with a judge. As part of a story she was working on, she asked him why there are different rules for divorce for men than women.

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A Fight for a Voice (3 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

The Aman Radio girls take a break at the Somaliland Culture and Sports Association (SOCSA) center after a hard day of work.

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A Fight for a Voice (5 of 15)
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By Anna Karatvuo
10 Apr 2013

Xodan and Faduma are searching for story ideas in the countryside.

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Lazy Day
Hargeisa, Somaliland
By MediaMikeDC
05 Mar 2013

A goat resting in the shade on the side of a road in Hargeisa, Somaliland.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 12
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Jan 2013

The head of a suicide bomber, who blew himself up outside of State House, the seat of the government, in Mogadishu on 29 January 2013.

NOTE: GRAPHIC IMAGE

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Somalia: Mogadishu's artistic rebirth
Somalia
By Abdi Latif Dahir
29 Dec 2012

With hope and transformation in the air as Somalia experiences its first sustained period of peace for two decades, a group of veteran Somalian artists have taken up their brushes again to send out a message for a better future that can be seen large and clear all around the city.

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Woman talking on phone
Eastleigh, Kenya
By Ulrik Pedersen
29 Nov 2012

Women talking on phones passing by a mosque in Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. Somalian part of Nairobi.

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man imitating shooting with an AK 47
Eastleigh, Kenya
By Ulrik Pedersen
24 Nov 2012

Man imitating shooting with an AK 47 in Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. Somalian part of Nairobi.

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people along main street
Eastleigh, Kenya
By Ulrik Pedersen
23 Nov 2012

Main street in Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. Somalian part of Nairobi.

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early morning
Eastleigh, Kenya
By Ulrik Pedersen
23 Nov 2012

People going to work and school early in the morning in Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. Somalian part of Nairobi.

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soccer
Eastleigh, Kenya
By Ulrik Pedersen
23 Nov 2012

Boy playing soccer in Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. Somalian part of Nairobi.

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man walking through market
Eastleigh, Kenya
By Ulrik Pedersen
23 Nov 2012

Man walking past an empty market in Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya.

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people crossing street after floods
Eastleigh, Kenya
By Ulrik Pedersen
23 Nov 2012

People crossin a flooded street in Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. Somalian part of Nairobi.

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early morning
Eastleigh, Kenya
By Ulrik Pedersen
23 Nov 2012

A side street in Eastleigh, Nairobi, Kenya. Somalian part of Nairobi.

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Eastleigh, the Somali Neighborhood of...
Eastleigh, Kenya
By Transterra Editor
23 Nov 2012

Eastleigh was founded in 1921. The colonial government allocated Nairobi's residential estates by race, and Eastleigh was pointed for Asians and elite Africans who worked as clerks, builders or shoemakers. Eastleigh was originally a large Kenyan Asian enclave until independence in 1963. Now Eastleigh is almost entirely inhabited by Somalis, except for a few indigenous residents. Somalis have invested heavily in the enclave, contributing over $1.5 billion in the neighborhood alone.

Eastleigh has seen many changes during the last year: first improvement of the situation in Somalia has given the chance for some Somalis to move back to Mogadishu followed by several terrorist attacks in late 2012 and lately the attack on the Westgate mall.

The attack on Westgate Mall on 21 of September has changed the situation in Eastleigh:

Shafici Mohamed Deq, Eastleigh resident, said the the main issues is now going around the failure of the Kenyan security agencies and their involvement, the Somali community is not that much in focus, and have no much worries except the Kenyan police use it as took to take bribe from illegal immigrants in Eastleigh.